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Fear of Rejection vs. Not Wanting Rejection

Fear of rejection is a term that has a different meaning from "not wanting rejection", although certainly the two can coincide.

In, sales, and specifically in sales, not all people have a fear of rejection. Those that don't might very well fear rejection in other areas of life. AND--it could be argued that anyone, in either case, who wants rejection would have some serious underlying issues best served by professional help.

My question is this, relating only to sales. Is the behavior pattern, and activity pattern, usually different between those who fear rejection, and those that don't want rejection (avoiding it)?

Think about it? - by Gary A Boye
Well I struggle with all the time and I would say there is certainly a distinction.

A person can have a fear and still work through it and this can really be the distinction between someone who is successful in a given area and someone who isn't.

For example, does it really matt - by kenpo1980
Gary- a topic probably not spoken about enough -FEAR- False Events Arent Real..Probably one of the biggest stumbling blocks in the sales process. I believe it is more common than spoken about whether on this forum or within sales meetings possibly due to embarassment.

many times i've asked salesman who came from a prospects meeting why the sale wasn't made and more times than not it came down to fear related. Not following up, asking the right questions, not asking for the sale, etc- all Fear related. Not always but with some salemans a very common theme.

My thoughts are that for the most part avoiding rejection and fearing rejection pretty much go hand in hand. However, i am sure that is not entirely true for everyone. Fear in the sales arena can be overcome with good coaching - by libbycop
Who wants rejection?

I have seen people who will avoid rejection by not asking for the sale or add on sales.

I know people who do not want rejection and have done something about rejection such as learning skills to gain commitment. I do not want my proposal to meet with rejection however I am not avoiding rejection. My belief is I will not get what I do not ask to receive and when I do not ask then my customer will not be satisfied. To do this a compelling message must be communicated and accepted by the customer.

I view fear of rejection as not facing rejection thusly avoiding rejection. - by rich34232
Who wants rejection?

I have seen people who will avoid rejection by not asking for the sale or add on sales.

I know people who do not want rejection and have done something about rejection such as learning skills to gain commitment. I do not want my proposal to meet with rejection however I am not avoiding rejection. My belief is I will not get what I do not ask to receive and when I do not ask then my customer will not be satisfied. To do this a compelling message must be communicated and accepted by the customer.

I view fear of rejection as not facing rejection thusly avoiding rejection.
On this topic, Rich, what percentage of your time in a typical workweek do you spend cold call prospecting? For instance, let's say in a 50-60 hour week, would it be 35 hours, 30, 20---how many? - by Gary A Boye
On this topic, Rich, what percentage of your time in a typical workweek do you spend cold call prospecting? For instance, let's say in a 50-60 hour week, would it be 35 hours, 30, 20---how many?
Gary this would be determined by your definition of cold calling. If it is arriving at a new client’s home or business then 50% of my time is spent cold calling. This can change week to week depending on the type of customer such as referral, repeat, or new customer. This past week every customer I visited was a new customer to our company and found us in the yellow pages, web site, or people I met at two recent networking events. I consider people that have never used us in the past as a cold call. - by rich34232
Gary this would be determined by your definition of cold calling. If it is arriving at a new client’s home or business then 50% of my time is spent cold calling. This can change week to week depending on the type of customer such as referral, repeat, or new customer. This past week every customer I visited was a new customer to our company and found us in the yellow pages, web site, or people I met at two recent networking events. I consider people that have never used us in the past as a cold call.
cold call n. A telephone call or visit made to someone who is not known or not expecting contact, often in order to sell something.
Based on that popularly accepted definition, and on this topic, Rich, what percentage of your time in a typical workweek do you spend cold call prospecting? For instance, let's say in a 50-60 hour week, would it be 35 hours, 30, 20---how many?

The reason I bring this up is that fear of rejection in sales manifests mostly in cold calling. I could not decipher how such fear could manifest in plumbing sales calls--although I guess anything's possible.
- by Gary A Boye
Sure it does exist in plumbing sales. The plumber refuses to suggest a better or higher end fixture due to fearing the customer will say no to their proposal. Dropping the price because the customer may say no to the price, offering a lower price solution due to not wanting to hear a no. Not proposing additional sales due to thinking the customer may say no. It is almost like a fear of the sale.

Happens quite fr