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How do you present price?

For example after you have discovered there needs, wants, etc. and offered your solutions, have gotten mini commitments, and so on. What words do you use to present price and close from there? - by LuvaTaSella
For example after you have discovered there needs, wants, etc. and offered your solutions, have gotten mini commitments, and so on. What words do you use to present price and close from there?
There are too many variables in the sales industry to provide a one-size-fits-all to that question.

In my own case, on large projects I might suggest an overall budget based on an initial assessment of costs relative to what the prospect wants to accomplish. What would eventually follow is a proposal that would align with the prospect's budget, modifications, and, compromises.

In other cases, I would refrain from discussing numbers until the end of my sales conversation.

And--in still other cases, I might mention the exact price at a preliminary stage.

There are just no pat answers to the question. We don't even know what you sell.

If I can have free rein to an oversimplification, it boils down to choosing between:
  • Build value. Quote costs.
  • Quote costs. Build value.
- by Gary A Boye
Yes, what your selling is of significant importance in how you present your price. - by libbycop
Yes, what your selling is of significant importance in how you present your price.
I sell storage buildings. So, b2c ticket ranges about $2,500 - $5,000 ave but sometimes much bigger.

I usually quote the base price if asked for model and size. I also let them know what the base price includes. After we discover any and all extras they want I build a quote. This is done in front of them either on computer if at the office or on paper by hand if at their home.

When I'm finished calculating the price I flip the page over to face them and then I go item by item thru each line until we reach final price. It's usually quite a bit higher than the base price and I want them to see how all the extras they requested contributed to the increase over the base price quote from before.

At that point I say to them "We accept 50% today, 50% upon completion. All I need is your autograph on the bottom of the page."

Then I put the pen down on the paper in front of them and shut up. - by LuvaTaSella
Guys - I'd be interested in your comments on this strategy.

We all know that objections and particularly hidden objections are major stumbling blocks to getting that all important signature. My premise is this - an unanswered or unacknowledged objection remains in the mind of the prospect and has real potential to becoming an 'issue' with him/her to the detriment of the rest of your presentation.

When presenting a proposal I give the prospect the document and allow them to read it through (me following page for page) in total silence but very carefully watching the body language at each page - especially the quote page.

if I see the prospect baulk at the price (which is mostly) I know I must obviously address the issue by going back and justifying the price ie doing the feature/benefit thing with a trial close at the conclusion of each one at a time.

Be interested in your comments.

DS Down Under - by satafternoon
Guys - I'd be interested in your comments on this strategy.

We all know that objections and particularly hidden objections are major stumbling blocks to getting that all important signature. My premise is this - an unanswered or unacknowledged objection remains in the mind of the prospect and has real potential to becoming an 'issue' with him/her to the detriment of the rest of your presentation.

When presenting a proposal I give the prospect the document and allow them to read it through (me following page for page) in total silence but very carefully watching the body language at each page - especially the quote page.

if I see the prospect baulk at the price (which is mostly) I know I must obviously address the issue by going back and justifying the price ie doing the feature/benefit thing with a trial close at the conclusion of each one at a time.

Be interested in your comments.

DS Down Under
First, I agree with the premise you stated in the second paragraph.

That said, I'll comment by saying it's not impossible to rescue a sales with a tactic. As a matter of fact, almost all tactics for closing a sale reveal flaws in what came before.

It is true that both silence and body language are often forms of communication. Are they a substitute for quality oral presentation skills? I think not.

I see your method as one of repair. All presentations in sales, both oral and written, are subject to "counter suggestions", often unspoken by the prospective buyer. As a person gains experience selling a product or service, he/she becomes aware of what the typical, often stereotypical, resistance is. That requires dealing with the "objections" BEFORE they arise--not after. If your strategy involves trying to repair what you didn't do--or did do incorrectly--at the end, through some tactic, you're decreasing your odds.

"Balking" at a price usually shows that you haven't conveyed value. Silence and body language (to and fro) are not good communication tools to convey value.

This also: The only time, when in the presence of a prospect, a salesperson should quote a price non-verbally (writing it down) is when a privacy issue needs to be respected, as when other parties might be in the room who are not privy to the price. - by Gary A Boye
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