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Can you be successful selling something you dont believe in?

Just wanted to get some thoughts to see what your opinions are regarding selling something you truly don't believe in. Whether its a product, service, etc.

My personal experience is that the lack of belief in a product, service or company your working for has an impact on the sale of it. - by libbycop
A person can be successful selling something he/she does not believe in. I am not sure, however, in what context you are using the word "successful."

Many of us have heard the statement, "You have to believe in what you sell." I know of no evidence that actually supports that statement. The thought, however, might have value to some people in a motivational sense. - by Gary A Boye
A person can be successful selling something he/she does not believe in. I am not sure, however, in what context you are using the word "successful."

Many of us have heard the statement, "You have to believe in what you sell." I know of no evidence that actually supports that statement. The thought, however, might have value to some people in a motivational sense.
Gary,

This turns out to be a tricky question. From my experience, you are right: you don't have to believe in a product to sell it. However, can this attitude help you meet your maximum potential? Most would say "no" for many reasons.

1 Prospects can often feel if a sales rep personally believes in what is being promoted. If the prospect can feel the lack of personal conviction, the integrity of that sales rep is put in jeopardy. After all, the sales rep now appears to be somewhat devious, saying one thing and believing the opposite.

2 When you believe in anything, there is a conviction in your speaking. You can also bring personal experiences into the process. I have known many auto sales managers demand that there sales staff buy the car they are selling for this very reason.

3 Overcoming objections becomes natural. Someone who believes in what is being sold, takes this stand by knowing the inferiority of the competition.

4 This is also why testimonials are always present in the marketing process.

5 If someone is new to sales, as you know, hesitation may not have anything to do with product belief but rather sales experience. Trainers prefer new trainees to believe in what they are selling as a confidence builder.

6 Talented and experienced sales people like yourself have so many weapons in their arsenal, that belief is not an issue, and confidence is second nature.

7 For me, if someone is new to sales, and lacks belief in what is being sold, that can an unsurmountable double whammy. - by John Voris
John, I developed the habit of answering the question as it was stated. In this case it was "Can you be successful selling something you don't believe in?"

The pure answer is yes.

If you would have put your additional information in the form of questions, and I responded, I would probably have agreed with most of your points.

When you said "For me, if someone is new to sales, and lacks belief in what is being sold, that can an insurmountable double whammy.", I might disagree with that. Many people are recruited into sales positions where ongoing product knowledge training takes considerable time--sometimes months, They would initially lack the information necessary to decide whether they believe in the product or not. Those conditions would not cause failure. - by Gary A Boye
John, I developed the habit of answering the question as it was stated. In this case it was "Can you be successful selling something you don't believe in?"

The pure answer is yes.

If you would have put your additional information in the form of questions, and I responded, I would probably have agreed with most of your points.

When you said "For me, if someone is new to sales, and lacks belief in what is being sold, that can an insurmountable double whammy.", I might disagree with that. Many people are recruited into sales positions where ongoing product knowledge training takes considerable time--sometimes months, They would initially lack the information necessary to decide whether they believe in the product or not. Those conditions would not cause failure.
Gary,

For me there were too many conditionals such as who is asking the question, that caused me to avoid the black and white version. You picked up on that as well. :)

To say "yes," to a newbie who does not believe in what is being sold and is struggling, may be neglectful. If that person believed in the product, that may be the positive push needed.

Personally, I could never sell something I didn't believe in. When I tried, I lost the confidence I needed. The more I believed in the product the more money I made. This of course adds comments on what is "success" as you pointed out.

I sold life insurance at one time. The product knowledge alone took several weeks to get the basics.There was not going to be anything I would learn to break my belief in insurance.

Nevertheless, you are right the pure answer is still "YES." - by John Voris
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