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If most sales are made after the fifth closing attempt ...

So I've heard, and I'm sure many of you have, that most sales
will be closed AFTER the fifth closing attempt, even though most
salespersons only ask once or twice.

My question is, how do you keep asking? I sell things called
Starving Student Cards door-to-door, which are kind of like coupon books and while they're holding
one looking it over, once I ask a closing question, and they say no, they start handing me the card back, indicating that it's the end of the sales conversation. So obviously I don't just ask another closing question right then and there... so what do I do
to continue so I am able to keep persisting?

I apolgize in advance if this is a super obvious question, I'm still
new to selling, only about 2 months real experience so far.

Thanks! - by ChrisOrlob
It is a fictional premise that most sales are made after the fifth closing attempt.

Your post, however, poses another question. Why are you handing the person the card? That's a no-no in door to door selling. - by Gary A Boye
My boss originally said that it would create a sense of ownership.

Why don't you hand things to them in door to door? Not to challenge, your statement, I really want to learn. - by ChrisOrlob
My boss originally said that it would create a sense of ownership.

Why don't you hand things to them in door to door? Not to challenge, your statement, I really want to learn.
The concept of sense of ownership can be a factor in selling, and, it's worth discussing in the correct context. However, it would not be present through that maneuver.

Handing someone a card or some promotional material can have at least two negative effects. It's a distraction, for one thing, and it will take the focus away from what you're saying. Also, it can make an uncomfortable impression. At worst, it can be considered intrusive by some people.

In the years when door-to-door selling was much more common, the top producers were very aware of such nuances. One subtlety was to always take a step back when the person came to the door. A side note: Cards, such as you describe were effective in holding aggressive dogs at bay; simply extending one out towards them would tweak their interest and calm them. - by Gary A Boye
ok, that makes sense.

So I usually don't hand them one until 2 or so minutes of talking, but the card is a big list (it folds up) and I would think most people would still want to see one. So is it still alright if I let them hold one after a couple minutes of talking first? There's literally hundreds of things listed on there. - by ChrisOrlob
ok, that makes sense.

So I usually don't hand them one until 2 or so minutes of talking, but the card is a big list (it folds up) and I would think most people would still want to see one. So is it still alright if I let them hold one after a couple minutes of talking first? There's literally hundreds of things listed on there.
Okay, that's a slightly different spin. We're always at the mercy of what the member reveals, and, the context also.

Let's go back. You, your boss, and, I are using the phrase "sense of ownership." But we're all smart enough to know ownership is not one of the five senses. The fact is that involving more than one of the prospect's senses can be effective sales strategy. In years gone by, Encyclopaedia Britannica professionals invited prospects to "smell the leather" of their sample leather bound prospectus.

More importantly, we want the prospect to participate. Handing that person some printed material at any stage ( in your case, after talking for two minutes) is useless unless it invites participation. Asking the prospect if he notices any merchants on the list that he already patronizes is an example. Coupon programs have value. The prospect needs to discover and acknowledge the value. He doesn't want to "own" a piece of paper, but he might want to own the savings from his next ten pizza purchases, his next car wash, his next dry cleaning bill, and his next purchase of a set of tires.

Your boss has shown you a tactic. All tactics are useless without an underlying strategy. The visual aid in question here will help you only if you incorporate it into your overall strategy of getting participation by the prospect while examining the value of your offer. - by Gary A Boye
That right there is Genius.

Thank you - by ChrisOrlob
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