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The Best Way to Learn

Hey guys, I've been wondering about what is the best way of
going about mastering sales skills?

A lot of self-development instructors say read in your field every day,
but here's my thing: Do you want to just keep reading about selling
and practicing what you learn? Or is it a better idea to take like, say,
one book, and work on ONE specific principle out of the book for
an entire week before moving onto the next principle?

Or would sort of combining the two be good? Taking a list of
principles, working on one per week, and reading other sales books too just for the sake of getting it into your subconscious mind but not yet totally focusing on the specific principles yet. - by ChrisOrlob
Hey guys, I've been wondering about what is the best way of
going about mastering sales skills?

A lot of self-development instructors say read in your field every day,
but here's my thing: Do you want to just keep reading about selling
and practicing what you learn? Or is it a better idea to take like, say,
one book, and work on ONE specific principle out of the book for
an entire week before moving onto the next principle?

Or would sort of combining the two be good? Taking a list of
principles, working on one per week, and reading other sales books too just for the sake of getting it into your subconscious mind but not yet totally focusing on the specific principles yet.
The topic's title is The Best Way to Learn. I'll address that.

The best way to learn selling is through UNDERSTANDING which is the best way to learn a lot of things. The majority of sales authors in those overcrowded book shelves lack real understanding. It's tough to teach what you don't understand.

You mention principles. Whose principles? If you mentioned Dale Carnegie, Brian Tracy, Og Mandino, or the great Frank Bettger, I'd be okay with that. They have, or had, UNDERSTANDING.

Here we teach FOUR UNDERSTANDINGS, which, if you assimilate them, will take you to the top in selling. Build on those and you will not need to add much. Here they are.
Every potential customer you meet is comparing the EXPERIENCE they have with you to the experiences they have with others. Your success in selling comes from making the other experiences pale by comparison.

HONEST INTRINSIC QUESTIONS are the building blocks of a sale.

PREPAREDNESS is the most important skill in selling.


CLOSING is a progression of consent.

- by Gary A Boye
That sounds right.

And yes, I would call myself a follower for each of those mentioned above-- I've read a book by each. However I've also studied things by Joe Girard, Tom Hopkins, and Zig Ziglar, are they credible sources as well? - by ChrisOrlob
That sounds right.

And yes, I would call myself a follower for each of those mentioned above-- I've read a book by each. However I've also studied things by Joe Girard, Tom Hopkins, and Zig Ziglar, are they credible sources as well?
I'm happy you think my reply sounds right.

We're not here to rank sales authors but those I mentioned deserve our praise. If you focus on the Four Understandings I shared above, you won't have to worry about that stuff.

You mentioned in passing that you read Frank Bettger's book. Read it again and you'll do more than mention it in passing. I said "great" for a reason.

The best of luck to you. - by Gary A Boye
Hey guys, I've been wondering about what is the best way of going about mastering sales skills?
On the topic of mastery... I believe that Mastery requires mindful practice. Reading is not the same as practicing. An excellent book on the topic is "Mastery: The Keys to Success and Long-Term Fulfillment" by George Leonard. - by Jeff Blackwell
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