Home > Resistance > I can get it for less.

I can get it for less.

Please post your response(s) to: "I can get it for less." - by Community Mailbox
Which is more important to you price or value? - by BossMan
No question about it. [Pause] I'm sure it's possible that if you spend enough time shopping from vendor to vendor that eventually you might find someone with a lower price on this particular item.

The question is, "how much" will you save on the whole and at "what cost"? The costs could be your time, the hassle of shopping store to store, and what about the quality of service after the sale.

Keeping all of this in mind, could shopping around really be worth the few dollars you might save? - by SalesGuy
Are we comparing apples to apples? Tell me, what are you comparing our price to? - by Houston
Have you seen something similar for less? - by Iceman
I understand there is a difference in our pricing; i would be shocked if there weren't. The reason there is a slight difference in the price of our ... is that there is a huge difference in the value that we deliver. - by kac069
"Go for it then."

MitchM - by MitchM
I'm not surprised. It's a competitive marketplace. In addition to price... what other issues do we need to address?


Best regards,

Ike
- by ikrieger
Maybe handling the issue up front before the question is ever asked....

Before we get to far into this let me say that we rarely come out with the lowest price. Knowing that, how do you want to proceed? - by jdedwa11
You can only get this response if you haven't given and sold a "Unique Selling Proposition."

If you haven't differentiated in some way the solution which you offer, then you don't have any value to stand on by which you can say NO you can't get what we offer for less as we are the only one's that offer this (combination).

The answer to any doubt re the above is in this example:

If you buy a product for less and it doesn't solve the problem you intended, did you actually save money?

NO.

And now you will probably pay even more!

Your unique selling proposition tells the prospect that the differences in your total offer are the values that make the price valid.

The statement simply isn't true in any proper sales approach. Yes even if you sell pencils this statement should never be valid. If it is you haven't differentiated your offer/company. - by Flyn L. Penoyer
I agree with Flyn

Such issues should be resolved at the outset.

Seasoned sales reps know that sales consists of phases of marketing with the actual sale in the conclusion. If that prospect wants only "cheap," then he or she is not a member of our target market.

If early in the process someone said, "I can get this cheaper" I said, "Of course!!" But it certainly not the same thing which is why we have been in business for 40 years.

Here are just a few lines I used

1 We cater to discriminating tastes.

2 We serve those who appreciate the difference as you do.

3 Of course, we are not for everyone.

4 Sometimes we all need to splurge on ourselves, if we don't who will?

5 What happens when you get less than satisfactory results? What if we can guarantee that will never happen with us?


Please post your response(s) to: "I can get it for less."
- by John Voris
I had one customer last year who used this with me. I simply asked him what it would cost him over the lifetime of the product if he went with that particular vendor. He went with me.

Many customers these days are only looking at initial outlay...you must prove to them that initial cost is only a small part of their overall investment. A cheaper vendor may cost them quite a bit more in the long run. (As is the case in my industry 90% of the time).

Qualify this aspect upfront and you won't run into "I can get it for less".

Best, Stacy - by StacyJo1962
You can only get this response if you haven't given and sold a "Unique Selling Proposition."

If you haven't differentiated in some way the solution which you offer, then you don't have any value to stand on by which you can say NO you can't get what we offer for less as we are the only one's that offer this (combination).

The answer to any doubt re the above is in this example:

If you buy a product for less and it doesn't solve the problem you intended, did you actually save money?

NO.

And now you will probably pay even more!

Your unique selling proposition tells the prospect that the differences in your total offer are the values that make the price valid.

The statement simply isn't true in any proper sales approach. Yes even if you sell pencils this statement should never be valid. If it is you haven't differentiated your offer/company.
Excellent point!

At a fund raiser a tray of fudge was bought for $45.00. Why? Anyone can get fudge for less!

Why do people donate to social causes? Where are the "features and benefits?"

Why are writing pens selling from $200.00 to over $100,000.00? Can you buy a pen for less?

Why do many people insist on buying locally even though they may be paying a higher cost?

The price/object exchange process is an illusion--ALWAYS.

It is based on perceived abstract value.

By establishing your "unique selling proposition" early in the sales process, buying it for less should not be an issue.

However, the only glitch is if you're selling the wrong value or that person does not share your interpretation of that value, you never had a prospect in the first place only a suspect.

Nevertheless if price and value are handled early, think of the time saved.

Not everyone is your customer anyway.


- by John Voris
I would agree that this should not come up however it does even when value has been given. Here are some things that I never will give back to the client and that is; never tell the client that he or she could not get the same product. If he or she does get the same product you are a liar. Never confirm that the product can be purchased cheaper through your competition. This will confirm to the client that he or she should buy it from your competition. If in fact the client can purchase the same product from the competition how can this product be of cheaper quality than yours?


I would confirm with the client what he or she already has stated what items the client liked, their perceived value of my solution. I then would ask the client more questions to gain more of an idea of their perceived value. I would ask the client if he or she would like to know why more people use me for this product and service. In our case our competition can deliver the same product for less and most likely the same service. This is why my front end takes more time than my competition. This time is used getting to know the mood, motives and personality of the client that usually bypasses the Joe’s down the street can do it cheaper. My response to this is I really do not want to talk about Joe’s, however if I thought that they could deliver the service, quality, professionalism, and service after the sale I would be there. But (short pause) I am not I am here.

What I must drive is the difference and that difference is me.

Regards
Richard - by rich34232
I understand there is a difference in our pricing; i would be shocked if there weren't. The reason there is a slight difference in the price of our ... is that there is a huge difference in the value that we deliver.

I like your statement

Huge difference in the value that we deliver

I have won over customers with this statement - by jmassiatte
I would agree that this should not come up however it does even when value has been given. Here are some things that I never will give back to the client and that is; never tell the client that he or she could not get the same product. If he or she does get the same product you are a liar. Never confirm that the product can be purchased cheaper through your competition. This will confirm to the client that he or she should buy it from your competition. If in fact the client can purchase the same product from the competition how can this product be of cheaper quality than yours?


I would confirm with the client what he or she already has stated what items the client liked, their perceived value of my solution. I then would ask the client more questions to gain more of an idea of their perceived value. I would ask the client if he or she would like to know why more people use me for this product and service. In our case our competition can deliver the same product for less and most likely the same service. This is why my front end takes more time than my competition. This time is used getting to know the mood, motives and personality of the client that usually bypasses the Joe’s down the street can do it cheaper. My response to this is I really do not want to talk about Joe’s, however if I thought that they could deliver the service, quality, professionalism, and service after the sale I would be there. But (short pause) I am not I am here.

What I must drive is the difference and that difference is me.

Regards
Richard
New post on this thread caused me to re-examine Rich's post.

I want to make a point. Among other things SalesPractice is about Learning by Inquiry. Much of the state of education at all levels of academia has become what I call Learning by Audition which is about students showing how much they already know. It's been also referred to as Entity Learning which retards growth as opposed to Incremental Learning which keeps you growing.

I've learned by teaching as well as by the fact that I have an insatiable curiosity. It forces me into Incremental Learning.

That said--I encourage people to STOP and read what Rich had to say here. There is a wealth of "how to" in his post, and if you are serious about growing--no matter what your current level--grab it! - by Gary A Boye
Mr Prospect...if I hear you correctly..it's not that our product isn't worth what we're asking... it's just a little bit more than you want to spend? Is it the overall price or the monthly investment? Well Mr Prospect...sometimes it's better to pay a little more than you wanted than less than you really needed. You see...My company made a business decision a long time ago...they decided that it would be easier to explain the price of our product to the customer once...rather than apologize to them for the quality of it forever.... - by hudsonvalley
The only reason why a prospect would have an objection to your pricing is because you probably didn't do a good job in qualifying them in the first place. If it is obvious that they can afford your service because you've done your diligence by finding out what they do for a living, and how much they make potentially, and the reason for their hesitation is price, then perhaps you have not thoroughly expressed the value they'll be receiving by choosing your offer.

From the onset of your presentation or offer, there are several things you should do before closing to ensure that your qualified prospect sees the value in what you're offering and not the price tag.

When you approach a prospect, you want to go in with the intention that you're going for a long-term relationship. So like all relationships, you're going to need to woo and wow your prospect, reel them in slowly, but surely, until you have them hooked.

Ask Questions
Everyone likes to feel like the center of the universe, so the conversation not pitch, should start with questions. For example, if you're selling a service that helps them save time, ask open-ended questions like, how do you balance work, home and family life?"
Open-ended questions create an opportunity for dialog and allows you to collect pertinent information that you can use when making your pitch. This question and answer session will set the tone for your entire interaction so listen carefully and ask the right questions. Throughout the conversation, as more probing questions like,"What do you do for a living?"..."Are you single?"..."what do you like to do during your spare time?"...if those things aren't mentioned voluntarily. Use this information throughout your presentation where practical.

Tell the "WHY", Don't Sell the "WHAT"
I find that most people focus on the 'what' and forget to talk about the 'why'. I say, telling why you are selling your product/service is always better than the 'what' because the reasons behind why you're selling allows your client to make a personal connection. For example: "This service was created for people like you. I know first-hand how stressful life can be when you have to work, take care of home and your family. We've made it our business to help busy people like you become more efficient, have more time and have a better quality of life."

This kind of phrasing does three things, again, puts the prospect in the center of the conversation,makes the prospect feel like you can relate on some level andmakes the presentation feel less sales-pitch and more conversational.

What's In It For Them
You're asking them to give you money for what you can do for them so you had better make a great case for yourself. Does your product or service make their lives easier in any way? Does it provide some kind of pleasure, provide status, or is a solution to a problem? Make sure you list all the different ways your product/service can affect and benefit your prospect. Make an overwhelming case for what you're selling by listing every possible way your service/product can be used.

Ask them more questions like, what are your biggest issues...what do you dislike most about....ect. and then give solutions.

Genuinely talk about how you've been able to help others, with an example or two.

Leave plenty of room for questions and comments. No one likes to be in a one-way conversation. The more of a conversation this is, the better rapport you create. People buy from who they know, like or trust. If they don't know or trust you, make sure they like you.


Give Them An Offer, They Cannot Refuse
If you have a service/product that requires an ongoing (contractual or non-contractual) relationship, then you can afford to make them an offer they can't refuse. Often, bringing up a price-point is another way of saying, 'you're asking me to shell out alot of money and I don't trust that you'll be able to deliver'.

Allowing them to sample your work at a discounted price is all they might need to make a decision...but don't call it a discount! Call it your introductory offer, whatever you'd like. What this does is remove the pressure of making a commitment, and creates an opportunity for trust and experience. At a discounted rate, you receive a little something for your trouble, and the prospect feels like they've received great value.

Hug Them With Customer Service

Make sure you address all concerns and issues at the end of the trial run. Customer service is at its most important at this stage. It is crucial that the customer feels completely satisfied and if not, is given the opportunity to express any feedback, good or bad.

There is a huge difference between good customer service and great customer service. They way you respond to their concerns, questions or desires will determine whether they move on with you or not.

If there were any issues, now is the time to make it right by going above and beyond. Show them that you are here for them and not for their money buy offering to make it right on your dime and time. I

If everything is great, feel free and unashamed to ask for the sale. "Are you ready to get started?" You've rolled out the red carpet, you've fed them the strawberries and now its time for them to make decision. Be confident and decisive by giving them their options, and offering to answer any remaining questions. Walk them through the process if they'd like.

At the end of a pitch, an excuse for not signing up usually is a failure on your part to make the right argument from the start. Make sure your prospect is qualified, tell them what you can do for them, allow them to experience what you do at a great value to them and follow up with great customer service. If you execute these steps and follow through, it will be you they're chasing at the end. - by Neghie
This an interesting thread and I'm pleased to see it re-opened.

With all respect to the members who took their time to respond, I can say that none of the ideas would align with the perspective of Path to Greatness™ from the developers of Salespractice.

Most products or service can be purchased for less.

WE can run away from resistance as in the example above: "Go for it." We can attempt to qualify budget when the prospect hasn't inferred it's a problem. We can fail to listen and answer an objection never stated such as "can't afford" when the prospect merely stated he can buy it for less. We can establish relationship/rapport as Rich suggested in his excellent post.

OR we can TRANSCEND THE OBJECTION which is the most strategically sound path.

That said, here's a real life example that puts the issue into what Path to Greatness™ calls a "double win perspective."
"Fred, I'm aware of that--primarily because half my existing clients tell me exactly that. So you're in good company. The fact is, they're continuing to buy from me because they're comparing experiences rather than price. They found the small gap in price difference is insignificant when they're comparing quality, service, and reliability. Fred, we built our business on that factor."

That's real world selling by transcending resistance, not "overcoming" objections.


- by Gary A Boye
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