Home > Closing > When do you take "No" for an answer?

When do you take "No" for an answer?

How many times do you keep asking a prospect for the sale before you stop? I haven't had a lot of experience with this but it seems like it would be a little uncomfortable continuing to ask once someone has already said, "No". - by Jackie
IMO, You have to find out why they are saying "No". Is it because of something that just needs a little further explaination. Being able to tell the difference between a no that is a no because of an objection or if it is a true rejection is very important. Continuing to ask for the sale without dealing with the objections is not going to result in a positive response. There is no harm in asking what the problem is, explain to your prospect that you want to learn what to do better next time.;)

So, directly answering your question, you take "No" for an answer when they say no and their objection is one you can't solve,... or you can tell they are begining to get frustrated with you.:D - by Doc MC
If they mean it, then they only have to tell me once. If I don't believe them, well I keep trying until I'm convinced. :D - by Newbie
If you have gone through your sales cycle and dotted I's and crossed T's there are on 2 results.



1: You have qualified it out before you get to that stage

2: They say yes.



If you get a NO at after 80% probability you have not completed your sales cycle properly.

- by Bizal
If you get a NO at after 80% probability you have not completed your sales cycle properly.
What about when the "No" is nothing more than a stall. For instance, when one partner isn't comfortable making a decision alone? - by Gilbert
What about when the "No" is nothing more than a stall. For instance, when one partner isn't comfortable making a decision alone?
IMO, a "Stall" signals that the prospect doesn't want your product/service bad enough. Or put another way, there is more pain associated with making the decision than putting it off. - by MagicMan
mmmm



To us that says you have not established who all the decision makers are and what the purchasing criteria is.






- by Bizal
To us that says you have not established who all the decision makers are and what the purchasing criteria is.
Bizal, for sake of discussion, let's assume that you are talking to the decision maker and are aware of their purchasing criteria. With that established, when do "you" take "No" for an answer? - by MagicMan
Sorry


But sales is a process and it would depend on where we were and what they were saying no to. - by Bizal
... it would depend on where we were and what they were saying no to.
That I can agree with. - by MagicMan
It also depends on their tone of voice. A doubtful no can be based on someone putting unreasonable doubts in their minds while a definite NO means:
back off! - by MikeDammann
To me, NO just means NOT NOW. I always leave with the words..."Would it be alright if I contact you again, down the road?" - by RainMaker
To me, NO just means NOT NOW. I always leave with the words..."Would it be alright if I contact you again, down the road?"
I love it! :cool: - by Gilbert
I believe that with good marketing and qualification process, by the time you meet buyers they are ready, it is just a matter of sorting out the details. If they are still saying no, then there is a flaw in the qualification process.
So, it is a good idea to keep the funnel full, so we don't ask for the business per se when we need it but buyers ask for our help when they need it. It is a totally different dynamic.

Let's remember Peter Drucker's words: “The aim of marketing is to make selling superfluous”. I think there is something here. But most companies don't want to market their stuff. They want it all right away, and hire an army of peddlers to go out to "chase 'em and nail 'em".

In a way it is like date rape. Meeting prospects the first time, wrestling them to the ground and taking their money while they are screaming "No".

Isn't it surprising that people have a negative image of salespeople in general? The idea is that your prospects remain in an automated "keep in touch" system until they are ready for the purchase. What is the logic in chasing people who are screaming "No"?

Cheers

Bald Dog - by Bald Dog
To me, NO just means NOT NOW. I always leave with the words..."Would it be alright if I contact you again, down the road?"
I hate to say it, but I stand corrected with my answer ... this one is the best :) - by MikeDammann
I guess I'll stick to search engine marketing ;) - by MikeDammann
It also depends on their tone of voice. A doubtful no can be based on someone putting unreasonable doubts in their minds while a definite NO means: back off!
I learned this when dating. :p - by Houston
That's where I got my "wisdom" from as well ... then I woke up and realized that I am in a forum full of professionals :D - by MikeDammann
That's where I got my "wisdom" from as well ... then I woke up and realized that I am in a forum full of professionals :D
I knew that crack was going to get me in trouble. :eek: - by Houston
In a way it is like date rape. Meeting prospects the first time, wrestling them to the ground and taking their money while they are screaming "No".
This is the only tactic that will work for products that fall short on benefits and HIGH on price. My philosophy is that is your product is a good value, your customer can recognize it and you don't have to shove it down throat before they come to their senses (WHEN they are ready to buy). - by RainMaker
My philosophy is that is your product is a good value, your customer can recognize it and you don't have to shove it down throat before they come to their senses (WHEN they are ready to buy).
I think that this is a very good point, that sometimes it is just an issue of timing. - by Doc MC
But how do people recognise value? Through education, which is a significant part of good marketing. So, they come to their own conclusions about the value of the stuff. Let's remember, beauty is in the eye of the beholder. We can only improve the beauty, but they have to perceive it in order to buy.

Thoughts?

Bald Dog - by Bald Dog
But how do people recognise value? Through education, which is a significant part of good marketing. So, they come to their own conclusions about the value of the stuff. Let's remember, beauty is in the eye of the beholder. We can only improve the beauty, but they have to perceive it in order to buy.
Customers can also be educated through a well design and thought out sales presentation. Would it not be just as good to explain face-to-face the value of your product? Marketing is a very important part of sales for lead generation and exposure to consumers, however without salespeople following up the marketing efforts (for most products) sales won't automatically come. - by Doc MC
Customers can also be educated through a well design and thought out sales presentation. Would it not be just as good to explain face-to-face the value of your product? Marketing is a very important part of sales for lead generation and exposure to consumers, however without salespeople following up the marketing efforts (for most products) sales won't automatically come.
I totally agree. I also believe that it is the salespeople who should provide the post-sale support. After all, they have a relationship with the client.

I think the problem with educating at the sales presentation is that prospects's scepticism is high. It is an artificial environment and prospects's perception is that salespeople try to manipulate the process to their favour.

I think people in general are more receptive to doing their education by digesting the stuff we send them. And that stuff shouldn't a brochure or other self-aggrandisement piece. It should be some preliminary value around the improved condition the product or service accomplishes. - by Bald Dog
...I think people in general are more receptive to doing their education by digesting the stuff we send them. And that stuff shouldn't a brochure or other self-aggrandisement piece. It should be some preliminary value around the improved condition the product or service accomplishes.
Wouldn't that open the door for a misinterpretation of the marketing materials you send them? I don't mind people being skeptical before a presentation, but like I said previously if it is well thought out, they should come around to see the value. - by Doc MC
Wouldn't that open the door for a misinterpretation of the marketing materials you send them?
I think here comes the importance of crisp and clear copy. Pictures can be misinterpreted, but written words as almost as obvious as a ham sandwich.

I don't mind people being skeptical before a presentation, but like I said previously if it is well thought out, they should come around to see the value.
Yes, they can be sceptical, but I want them to overcome their own scepticism while in the automated follow-up system. Personally I don't want to invest my precious time in people while they are sceptical. Most of them never overcome that scepticism, and we end up wasting time and energy on tyre-kickers. - by Bald Dog
I think here comes the importance of crisp and clear copy. Pictures can be misinterpreted, but written words as almost as obvious as a ham sandwich.
First of all, many good comments made in the past few posts...too many to quote. There is only one problem with this one...Words are only powerful if THE PROSPECT TAKES THE TIME TO READ THEM! This is a major challenge today. I find materials sent in the mail more often than not, never get read because people are so busy and there is so much competing for their time and attention. If I send something in the mail, I will only send a postcard. They have to at least see it when they are shuffling through the mail and I try to grab them with a large headline hook because their brain will at least read that much before moving on. (of course, now we're back at marketing (lead generation) as opposed to sales. Every blue moon a sales will just "make itself" but mostly my sales only come with a live presenation. - by RainMaker
I am lucky to work with one of the best sales people out there, lately we are getting some great referrals from existing clients, referrals seem to "sell themselves" basically. - by MikeDammann
I am lucky to work with one of the best sales people out there, lately we are getting some great referrals from existing clients, referrals seem to "sell themselves" basically.
Oh, that is such a good point! I need to ask for referrals and often I forget!! - by RainMaker
...referrals seem to "sell themselves" basically.
In my experience referrals seem to "sell themselves" when it comes to the "provider" but still need guidance when it comes to the "product/service." - by Gilbert
I would like to add my thoughts to this discussion--but I have a question. How many times do you hear the actual word "No" as you have decribed? I mean "No" with those two letters. If my guess, based on my experience, is correct, you seldom hear that word. And--if my guess is correct--what do you hear? What words do they use to express what you hear as a no? - by Gary Boye
My guess is things like "nah", "no, not really" or "sorry but ... I really ...". - by MikeDammann
It depends on the sales person and his/her people knockledge to determine if the NO is really a NO here and to decide to put more effort in the sell to approach a YES or just to take the NO and move on. - by Sanddollar
I would like to add my thoughts to this discussion--but I have a question. How many times do you hear the actual word "No" as you have decribed? I mean "No" with those two letters. If my guess, based on my experience, is correct, you seldom hear that word. And--if my guess is correct--what do you hear? What words do they use to express what you hear as a no?

Yes Gary that is right, I often hear the words *maybe*, *Im not sure yet* *I'll get back with you* or they need to discuss the sale with a 2nd or 3rd person who is not at the meeting at this time. - by Sanddollar
Yes Gary that is right, I often hear the words *maybe*, *Im not sure yet* *I'll get back with you* or they need to discuss the sale with a 2nd or 3rd person who is not at the meeting at this time.
I can't think of 3 ocassions in 10 years time that i have heard the word no. Think about it, sleep on it, call you back, bad time, maybe even shopping but hardly ever 'no'. - by klozerking
I can't think of 3 ocassions in 10 years time that i have heard the word no. Think about it, sleep on it, call you back, bad time, maybe even shopping but hardly ever 'no'.
That being the case--and so consistent with my own observations and that of others I have talked to, wouldn't it be beneficial to get "NO" out in the open? Isn't that more meaningful honest feedback than the fluff and red herrings that prospects offer in place of a simple "no"? Isn't it easier, if we are so inclined, to ask a direct question as a reply to a direct answer--such as "Why?"

So the question of "When do you take 'no' for an answer?" is almost hypothetical. But to answer it, I think we take "no" for an answer when we are prepared to face a current truth with the full realization that the truth can change. The alternative is to play a pretend game that "Think about it, sleep on it, call you back, bad time, maybe... " means something other than "no". - by Gary Boye
The alternative is to play a pretend game that "Think about it, sleep on it, call you back, bad time, maybe... " means something other than "no".
In my experience, "Think about it, sleep on it, call you back, maybe..." rarely mean "No" as in "No, I do not want this." - by Agent Smith
That being the case--and so consistent with my own observations and that of others I have talked to, wouldn't it be beneficial to get "NO" out in the open? Isn't that more meaningful honest feedback than the fluff and red herrings that prospects offer in place of a simple "no"? Isn't it easier, if we are so inclined, to ask a direct question as a reply to a direct answer--such as "Why?"

So the question of "When do you take 'no' for an answer?" is almost hypothetical. But to answer it, I think we take "no" for an answer when we are prepared to face a current truth with the full realization that the truth can change. The alternative is to play a pretend game that "Think about it, sleep on it, call you back, bad time, maybe... " means something other than "no".
anything the customer says that isn't "no" means I need more information so that I can make a new decision. Help me find a way to own your product so I can save face. - by klozerking
anything the customer says that isn't "no" means I need more information so that I can make a new decision. Help me find a way to own your product so I can save face.
Think about that. As I recall, the conversation rate was 23 percent. And--you have admitted that you have very rarely ever heard "no". So the other 77 percent who ultimately reject your offer with other words want you to help them find a way to own your product so they can save face? - by Gary Boye
In my experience, "Think about it, sleep on it, call you back, maybe..." rarely mean "No" as in "No, I do not want this."
In your experience what does "Think about it, sleep on it, call you back, maybe..." mean?

Do you take those statements literally? Do people say to you ""No, I do not want this."?

If, for instance, those statements really mean "I need further information." as the popular meme goes, then why would they want to think over or sleep on incomplete facts? Why wouldn't they say "tell me more." right there and then? - by Gary Boye
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