Home > Resistance > We didn't want to spend that much.

We didn't want to spend that much.

We can reduce the price. What services did you want to drop? - by Agent Smith
How much did you originally plan to spend? - by Jolly Roger
"I do apologize Mr. Customer. I must have misunderstood you. So which of the following features do you NOT need, this, this or this. (Usually list the ones that I have identified as their needs) - by jrboyd
Mr Client would you agree that it is better to spend more than you thought then less then you should?Tell a story

Have you ever purchased a similar product for less only to return it due to premature product failure. Another story
Why are we not giving the client options? A good ,better, best along with a show and tell presentation? - by rich34232
Mr and Mrs client How much did you plan on spending? - by MPrince
All of my customers say that, it would help me to know how much you thought this project would cost, or how much you hoped it would cost today.


I try to get their number before I give the estimate, but I assume that I was unable to get it earlier and am going after the number now. - by Mr. Mike
Mr Client wouod you agree that it is better to spend more than you thought then less than you should. Tell a story of someone purchasing a simlar product for less and it failed .
Mrs Client would you agree that you deserve the best?
Quality is rarely cheap and cheap is seldom quality.
Story telling time and use real peoples names.
There is NO need to threatened to give a lesser product at that time.Give more information to base another decision. - by rich34232
..... ok, Mr prospect....

What is your budget for this project?

Have you considered leasing?

As you have agreed that this solution is the best for your business, is there an additional service that (if we could sanction to include within this package), would enable project go-ahead?

Any others? - by Tonyd
"I understand the economy is tough. For our business, the economy is extremly tough too. In addition, I am sure you are aware of all the companies going bankrupt. Well, we are not trying to be that company, which is why we will work with you, the best way that we can. Does that sound fair?" - by Jumpman
It's true... I'm definitely in the wrong business. i should be a preacher or social worker maybe.. because it's obvious that I'm not cut out for sales.

When someone tells me that we didn't want to spend that much, I pretty much agree with Mike, most would probably say that especially if they are on a budget and are planning to try to stick to it.

I think that I would prefer to ask which are the most important features to them and attempt to see if we could find a way to include those necessities for them at a price that they are comfortable with so they could move forward with what's important at a price that they could afford.

Aloha... Tom :cool: - by rattus58
It's true... I'm definitely in the wrong business. i should be a preacher or social worker maybe.. because it's obvious that I'm not cut out for sales.

When someone tells me that we didn't want to spend that much, I pretty much agree with Mike, most would probably say that especially if they are on a budget and are planning to try to stick to it.

I think that I would prefer to ask which are the most important features to them and attempt to see if we could find a way to include those necessities for them at a price that they are comfortable with so they could move forward with what's important at a price that they could afford.


Aloha... Tom :cool:

Tom, that is exactly why you are cut out for sales, because you care.

Warmest Regards
aka mary - by MPrince
I am in agreement with the thoughts expressed by Mike, Martha, and Tom on this subject. Those thoughts have a common thread, expressed in diffferent words. And--for newcomers to selling, I want to point out what it is.

Their suggested responses reveal that they have LISTENED to what the prospect has said. When people say "We didn't want to spend that much.", it is almost ALWAYS an honest statement, and an honest attempt to HELP YOU SELL THEM.

Listen to it, and HEAR IT. When prospects say those words, don't think of it as a ploy or resistance. People have a willingness to be honest, but they want to be HEARD as honest. Treasure their honesty, and work with them. Streamline the offer, probe their budget deeper, find a more compatible product, and WORK IT OUT. Forget "sales speak", talk to them as one human being to another. - by Ace Coldiron
I am in agreement with the thoughts expressed by Mike, Martha, and Tom on this subject. Those thoughts have a common thread, expressed in diffferent words. And--for newcomers to selling, I want to point out what it is.

Their suggested responses reveal that they have LISTENED to what the prospect has said. When people say "We didn't want to spend that much.", it is almost ALWAYS an honest statement, and an honest attempt to HELP YOU SELL THEM.

Listen to it, and HEAR IT. When prospects say those words, don't think of it as a ploy or resistance. People have a willingness to be honest, but they want to be HEARD as honest. Treasure their honesty, and work with them. Streamline the offer, probe their budget deeper, find a more compatible product, and WORK IT OUT. Forget "sales speak", talk to them as one human being to another.
Ace...there you go with that profound wisdom again. I love it! I just hope the new comers on this forum realize what a very unique opportunity they have here!

Warmest Regards - by MPrince
It's true... I'm definitely in the wrong business. i should be a preacher or social worker maybe.. because it's obvious that I'm not cut out for sales.

When someone tells me that we didn't want to spend that much, I pretty much agree with Mike, most would probably say that especially if they are on a budget and are planning to try to stick to it.

I think that I would prefer to ask which are the most important features to them and attempt to see if we could find a way to include those necessities for them at a price that they are comfortable with so they could move forward with what's important at a price that they could afford.

Aloha... Tom :cool:
Tom

Not only do I like what you just said, I think that is very honest and genuwine way of doing business. You are showing the potential client that you are not only willing to work with them, but also trying to fullfill their needs.

Your caring will have no limits to the amount of sales you can get, because of how much the customer respects what you are doing for them.

Take Care - by Jumpman
If they don't want to spend that much they obviously don't see the purchase as an investment. Most people don't like the cost of things but appreciate it's value at least to them. At this point they are telling you you haven't made a strong enough case to them that they need what you have. If you were drowning you wouldn't concern yourself with the cost of the life preserver that saves you. If it's a perceived value issue sell quality first and address cost. Quality stills sells, which would you prefer the parachute that's cheapest or the one you know will open? - by rjakini
If they don't want to spend that much they obviously don't see the purchase as an investment. Most people don't like the cost of things but appreciate it's value at least to them. At this point they are telling you you haven't made a strong enough case to them that they need what you have. If you were drowning you wouldn't concern yourself with the cost of the life preserver that saves you. If it's a perceived value issue sell quality first and address cost. Quality stills sells, which would you prefer the parachute that's cheapest or the one you know will open?
"If they don't want to spend that much they obviously don't see the purchase as an investment." What if they can't afford it? There is an argument that our housing crisis, our derivative crisis, and people investing in homes they couldn't afford may very well have come such actions.

So if I understand your position, you are saying that someone tells you they cannot afford your offering, you feel that you have just not educated them enough to appreciate what they're giving up.

Under that assumption, are you saying that whether or not someone can truly afford this or not, that you should press them into a purchase that though "valuable" in your terms, is at the limit of their discretionary capital?

Is it our duty to "sell" at any cost, or is it our duty to accomodate the best interests of our buyer (clients)? In my OPINION, it is our duty to accomodate the clients financial as well as utilitarian interests. For example, I see the value of a Rolls Royce, but not to someone who has the budget of Buick. What service have we provided to allow someone to oversubscribe to a purchase?

It is my OPINION that we provide the best service when we have questioned the client to the extent that we fully understand his need for our products. It is also my BELIEF that if we cannot serve our client, it is up to us to let him know and if possible refer him to someone who can. This will pay many dividends in the long run.

It is my belief that it is our obligation to position the client to be able to have a clear picture of our product or service in order to evaluate the level of service desired or the products features that relate most to the clients primary applications.

In a nutshell, it is my OPINION AND BELIEF that it is far better to fit the product to my clients budget and application, rather than insisting that he/she "invest" in the best money can buy.

Fortunately, I don't sell boats or planes anymore either... :)

Aloha.... shds; ;bg - by rattus58
If they don't want to spend that much they obviously don't see the purchase as an investment.
I think that's a separate issue, rjakini. One can still perceive a purchase as being an investment, but want or need to stay within a particular level of "investment."

I might feel comfortable investing in a home that costs, let's say, $750,000. But I'm not comfortable investing in a home that costs $1,000,000...that doesn't mean I don't view my home purchase as an investment, right? It just means I don't want to, or can't, spend that kind of money, or that kind of product is more (or different) than what I need.

Skip Anderson - by Skip Anderson
Tom

Haha, that's funny about being a preacher or social worker. And, if that is the case, so be it. I do not think your approach is bad. I think there is no perfect approach at all. Every sales person is different and reacts differently for what works for them.

In addition, every situation is different, so one must reach differently. Sometimes helping a customer with their budget is the best approach because they will see how much you truly care in their best interest. Keep doing what you do. It makes sense to me! - by Jumpman
Usually I would try to setup a small little discount. You may be surprised that's all you needed. - by Polysquared
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