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Do you leave a message?

You have given a presentation. The prospect appeared genuinely intrested but for some reason has put off their purchase or would not commit to making a purchase for some reason.

You "follow-up" with them by phone to shake loose whatever it is that is keeping them from buying, but you get their voice mail.

Do you leave a message?...and if yes, what would be a good thing to say on? - by RainMaker
You have given a presentation. The prospect appeared genuinely intrested but for some reason has put off their purchase or would not commit to making a purchase for some reason.

You "follow-up" with them by phone to shake loose whatever it is that is keeping them from buying, but you get their voice mail.

Do you leave a message?...and if yes, what would be a good thing to say on?
If the prospect put off their purchase or would not commit did you ask why not? If not, why not?

The prospect's answer's would have given you their reasons so you wouldn't have to "shake loose" whatever it is keeping them from buying.

Whenever I call back there's an agreed upon reason why I'm calling back - in most cases. - by MitchM
If the prospect put off their purchase or would not commit did you ask why not? If not, why not?

The prospect's answer's would have given you their reasons so you wouldn't have to "shake loose" whatever it is keeping them from buying.

Whenever I call back there's an agreed upon reason why I'm calling back - in most cases.
In addition, we have an agreed upon time when I will call back. - by BossMan
In addition, we have an agreed upon time when I will call back.
With regard to both Mitch's and Bossman's posts, I coin the term promise-generated to describe a mutual agreement which sets the stage for a follow up. The easiest method is to make a promise about some specific further information that you will obtain and provide. Operative word: specific.

An agreed upon time, as BossMan suggests would probably be an enhancement. - by Gary Boye
With regard to both Mitch's and Bossman's posts, I coin the term promise-generated to describe a mutual agreement which sets the stage for a follow up. The easiest method is to make a promise about some specific further information that you will obtain and provide. Operative word: specific.

An agreed upon time, as BossMan suggests would probably be an enhancement.
I like that term and the fact that it's a response to bring something else to the table - it has the feeling of helpfulness and responsive.

Also, specific is very important - operative as Gary says. I had to learn this a few years ago as it wasn't something I'd been taught or knew of - but it completes a circle and concentric circles centered around something of value and mutual agreement is an immediate picture that comes to mind.

Layers of that creates something. - by MitchM
Yes, I agree with everything that has been said. Please note that no one has told me if they would leave a message on a follow up call which was my question.

...But since you asked questions, I'll throw this particular scenario out because I love your input.

I realize it is better to shake loose these objections during the presentation, but sometimes my "presesentations" are a little unconventional, not ideal, and I am really shooting from the hip. I am not selling to professionals that are sitting in offices scheduling meetings. My prospects are often unsophisticated, work crazy hours and they are not easily accessible. Their business is hectic and it is difficult to get their undivided attention.

This particular presentation was made "on the fly" by phone while the guy (an owner of a chain of pizza restaurants in Michigan) is on the road from one store to another. He asks me to time my call so he will be on the highway between stores.

Our conversation goes fairly well, all things considered. He tells me his time frame is by the "end of the year." He asks alot of questions and says he will probably have more questions, but can't really think of anything else at that moment. I agree to correspond with him by email. He states I should hear back from him by Wednesday. I send him a thank you email, summarizing our discussion and the price and terms of what we discussed. I invite him to fire away with additional questions.

I do not hear back by the specified day. I send him an email asking him if our program meets his objectives and again invite him to ask additional questions or to be forth coming with any concerns or reservations he might have and I will be happy to address them. I also tell him the benefit of utilizing our program during the holidays as opposed to waiting until the end of the year.

4 or 5 days pass. Next I call him. He asks me to call back after 3 (which is a very common response for restaurant owners.) At 3, I get his voice mail.

Now what? - by RainMaker
Yes, I agree with everything that has been said. Please note that no one has told me if they would leave a message on a follow up call which was my question.

...But since you asked questions, I'll throw this particular scenario out because I love your input.

I realize it is better to shake loose these objections during the presentation, but sometimes my "presesentations" are a little unconventional, not ideal, and I am really shooting from the hip. I am not selling to professionals that are sitting in offices scheduling meetings. My prospects are often unsophisticated, work crazy hours and they are not easily accessible. Their business is hectic and it is difficult to get their undivided attention.

This particular presentation was made "on the fly" by phone while the guy (an owner of a chain of pizza restaurants in Michigan) is on the road from one store to another. He asks me to time my call so he will be on the highway between stores.

Our conversation goes fairly well, all things considered. He tells me his time frame is by the "end of the year." He asks alot of questions and says he will probably have more questions, but can't really think of anything else at that moment. I agree to correspond with him by email. He states I should hear back from him by Wednesday. I send him a thank you email, summarizing our discussion and the price and terms of what we discussed. I invite him to fire away with additional questions.

I do not hear back by the specified day. I send him an email asking him if our program meets his objectives and again invite him to ask additional questions or to be forth coming with any concerns or reservations he might have and I will be happy to address them. I also tell him the benefit of utilizing our program during the holidays as opposed to waiting until the end of the year.

4 or 5 days pass. Next I call him. He asks me to call back after 3 (which is a very common response for restaurant owners.) At 3, I get his voice mail.

Now what?
I call back and leave this: "Alonzo, this is Mitch. Call me at _________"

If he doesn't call and I b