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Sales Objections and Stalls

I'm starting to believe that no matter how good of a performance a salesperson gives that resistance (objections, stalls) are still likely to come up and that this is normal. Does anyone else feel this way too? - by AZBroker
I'm starting to believe that no matter how good of a performance a salesperson gives that resistance (objections, stalls) are still likely to come up and that this is normal. Does anyone else feel this way too?
I haven't considered what I do as a performance - it's a role so maybe that's a good way to look at it - and the causes of resistance intereste me - I think the causes of resistance are typical and so is what we call resistance.

I called a woman looking for a way to make some extra income working from home so I told her a little about how our business works - we never got past her resistance or objection because in this case she didn't see herself doing what we do.

Other times I've eliminated that kind of discussion on the phone opting for a face-to-face presentation and the results are pretty much the same as going into more detail on the phone.

The causes for resistance in her go back to past experiences impacting today's decision making - maybe others too.

Then comes the question of either just ending the call or trying to get to the root causes of the resistance - I've done both and now find that just ending the call is what I prefer to do most of the time.

There's some conversation and yes, it's normal for people to resist what they don't want or believe they don't want which is really one-in-the-same.

Mike - by MitchM
I was thinking that even when the buyer wants the product that resistance can be normal. For instance, the kind of resistance that forms when preconceived ideas don't match with reality. - by AZBroker
I was thinking that even when the buyer wants the product that resistance can be normal. For instance, the kind of resistance that forms when preconceived ideas don't match with reality.
Sure, I would go along with that. I bump into that every once in a while like when a homeowner calls me out to list their MH and freaks out when I tell them my fee. They think that because real estate fees are 6% [+/-] that I will sell their $10,000 MH for $600. Right! ;) - by Thomas
Does anyone else feel this way too?
I agree. I also think that a lot of people bring baggage to the sales call. - by Jolly Roger
I'm starting to believe that no matter how good of a performance a salesperson gives that resistance (objections, stalls) are still likely to come up and that this is normal. Does anyone else feel this way too?
You are correct, it is quite normal for buyers to have questions and concerns (aka resistance) even when they want what you have to offer.

As JR pointed out, and Thomas illustrated, people enter the sales call with their own (mental) "baggage" and in many cases this is the source of the resistance.

However, this is not to imply that a salesperson will be helpless against this "baggage" and unable to preempt, uncover, or respond to resistance appropriately. ;) - by SalesGuy
You are correct, it is quite normal for buyers to have questions and concerns (aka resistance) even when they want what you have to offer.

As JR pointed out, and Thomas illustrated, people enter the sales call with their own (mental) "baggage" and in many cases this is the source of the resistance.

However, this is not to imply that a salesperson will be helpless against this "baggage" and unable to preempt, uncover, or respond to resistance appropriately. ;)
That does make me feel better. :) - by AZBroker
That does make me feel better. :)
Of course the salesman and saleswoman also come to the table with their baggage.

Mike - by MitchM
I'm starting to believe that no matter how good of a performance a salesperson gives that resistance (objections, stalls) are still likely to come up and that this is normal. Does anyone else feel this way too?
You mentioned objections and stalls but not rejection. Doesn't rejection fit in too? - by Mikey
You mentioned objections and stalls but not rejection. Doesn't rejection fit in too?
That was an oversight. Yes, I think there are times when no matter what the salesperson says the buyer will through up resistance (rejection). An example that comes to mind is when the prospect is pre-occupied with something important, doesn't want to talk to "anyone," and you happen to call. - by AZBroker
from a different thread : ...I read that thread and to date I couldn't relate to it (in context) so I didn't post anything. However, it's a worthwhile discussion and an interesting point you bring up. I was hoping you might expand on your thoughts.
In another thread a member had posted:
Sales Resistance is caused by persuading and convincing. So, it's not likely that doing more of what causes resistance will "break the resistance."

My guess is that you either started with a low probability prospect or that you are pushing too hard - probably both.
I've thought about it and can't agree that sales resistance "is" caused by persuading and convincing.

I can agree that in many cases a poor performance of persuading and convincing by the salesperson "is" or "may" be the cause of sales resistance. This isn't always the case. For instance the example I provided and the example Thomas provided. In both of those cases the source of the resistance mentioned was not the salesperson but the prospect. - by AZBroker
I can agree that in many cases a poor performance of persuading and convincing by the salesperson "is" or "may" be the cause of sales resistance. This isn't always the case. For instance the example I provided and the example Thomas provided. In both of those cases the source of the resistance mentioned was not the salesperson but the prospect.
There is a school of thought that suggests that a sales methodology based on "persuading and convincing" is, in itself, tantamount to performing poorly.

You are not of that school, based on your post. Frankly, it is a minority in sales that are. But--and this is a big but--have the conclusions that you have drawn in your selling career made you successful?

That is not a question that I would expect anybody to answer. But it's not completely rhetorical either. It's just that it is personal and not my business. If anybody here is working with beliefs that are allowing them to achieve the rewards of selling--then they really have to stay with those beliefs. I'm sure you agree.

And I do respect your views. - by Gary Boye
There is a school of thought that suggests that a sales methodology based on "persuading and convincing" is, in itself, tantamount to performing poorly.
We don't try and trick or pressure our clients into doing anything but we do use persuasion tools every day. Here are a couple of examples of persuasion tools that we use at our brokerage:
  • "Contrast" when determining the order homes will be shown in.
  • "Authority" everyday by requiring our agents to adhere to a strict professional image (education, automobile, office, paperwork, etc.).
  • "Scarcity", when it applies, by letting the buyer know the potential for the property to sell quickly (limited time) and if interested to make an offer ASAP.
  • "Social Proof" by showing the "demand" for a certain community or area. This is even more important in New Home subdivisions.
  • "Consistency" by securing commitments throughout the process.

The more I think about your post the more I think we're talking apples and oranges. I think you're talking about techniques to get people to do something they don't want to do and I'm talking about persuasion principles. Maybe this is just about semantics, I don't know.

What I do know is this... one of the most common questions new agents ask when failing is the field is, "What am I doing wrong?" If I was to give the generalization below... I could very well be pointing them in the wrong direction.
"Sales Resistance is caused by persuading and convincing. So, it's not likely that doing more of what causes resistance will "break the resistance."

My guess is that you either started with a low probability prospect or that you are pushing too hard - probably both
"
These type (unqualified and no referent) of generalizations, in my opinion, can be harmful and probably account for a lot of the problems inherent in many sales training programs. - by AZBroker
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