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Poor results in sales

For those who coach, mentor or manage others (including yourself) what have you found to be the most common cause behind poor results in selling or even life in general? - by Slick
Lack of motivation & lack of product knowledge! - by tigerlily
I have found a lack of work ethic to kill more salesmen than sloww business ever has, The ones most vulnerable are the ones with lots of talent who start fast and don't follow up. - by Rothgar the Pacifist
Most people that have been in sales for at least three years are intelligent, hard-working and persistent. However, the most highly successful salespeople - the top one-percent - have a number of characteristics that set them apart from the other 99 percent.

A very important characteristic is that they are constantly striving to improve their sales skills. They frequently try new sales methods and carefully track their results. When you are trying something new, which may increase or decrease your income, it invariably causes discomfort.

Top sales are willing to endure a lot discomfort in their quest for constant improvement. - by JacquesWerth
In my travels "Lack of a motivating force" has been the overwhelming reason for poor results in selling and in life. ;) - by SalesGuy
No "Drive" or "Lack of Motivation". - by AZBroker
Success is not common. To be successful, you need to be willing and able to do what unsuccessful people are not willing or able to do.

Most people that I have seen fail are not willing to do things that make them uncomfortable (a.k.a. Prospecting). So, I agree with a AZ, Salesguy, and Jacques. You need to have the drive and motivation to do things that might seem uncomfortable. - by Derek
In my travels "Lack of a motivating force" has been the overwhelming reason for poor results in selling and in life. ;)
This has been my experience too. It's all about the "Why". :) - by Marcus
That looks like a consensus to me. Thanks everyone. :) - by Slick
I would add that failure to take responsibility for an outcome can lead to poor results. My wife has a saying that goes, "If it's to be it's up to me." - by tycoon01
Hi,

What ways do you suggest for someone to get motivated?

Thanks,
Val - by realtor
Hi,

What ways do you suggest for someone to get motivated?

Thanks,
Val
Everyone is different but I think that a lot of people who are unmotivated have no vision at the front of their mind that compells them to act.

For instance, have you ever noticed how much work you get done the day before you go on vacation? :bg - by AZBroker
Top sales are willing to endure a lot discomfort in their quest for constant improvement.
Discomfort: One little word that SAYS IT ALL. - by RainMaker
Discomfort: One little word that SAYS IT ALL.
Can you expand on that RainMaker. Thank you. - by AZBroker
Have you ever wondered why Architects, Physicians, Accountants, Builders, Carpenters, and CEOs do not need to "get motivated" to do a good job every day?

Sales is only one of three professions that is highly concerned about motivation, and consumes millions of dollars of motivational products and techniques. The other two are the Armed Services, and Law Enforcement.

Have you ever wondered why?
Have you ever wondered what those three professions have in common?

Think job descriptions, objectives, work methods, skills, procedures, risks, and outcomes.

Is it possible that the sales job description is wrong and the commonality is illusion? - by JacquesWerth
Have you ever wondered why Architects, Physicians, Accountants, Builders, Carpenters, and CEOs do not need to "get motivated" to do a good job every day?

Sales is only one of three professions that is highly concerned about motivation, and consumes millions of dollars of motivational products and techniques. The other two are the Armed Services, and Law Enforcement.

Have you ever wondered why?
Have you ever wondered what those three professions have in common?

Think job descriptions, objectives, work methods, skills, procedures, risks, and outcomes.

Is it possible that the sales job description is wrong and the commonality is illusion?
I've noticed that people in general, regardless of profession, suffer from a lack of motivation. :wi - by AZBroker
I've noticed that people in general, regardless of profession, suffer from a lack of motivation. :wi
People who are not compensated by performance don't NEED motivation to get paid. - by RainMaker

Sales is only one of three professions that is highly concerned about motivation, and consumes millions of dollars of motivational products and techniques. The other two are the Armed Services, and Law Enforcement.

....Is it possible that the sales job description is wrong and the commonality is illusion?
How interesting. I've never heard this before. Please connect the dots for me, Jacques...what IS the commonality between these professions? - by RainMaker
People who are not compensated by performance don't NEED motivation to get paid.
I don't understand where you're going with that. Can you clarify? - by AZBroker
Can you expand on that RainMaker. Thank you.
Discomfort is what we must overcome EVERY DAY. I clearly see it holds me back, at times. I worked as an executive secretary for a few years. I sat and waited for work to come to me. My pay was not dependent on me voluntarily putting myself in a position of discomfort such as prospecting, etc. Discomfort was accidental and inconsequential.

I realize this was not your context of the word "discomfort," Jacques. I am also aware that your system is designed to mitigate (eliminate?) discomfort. Sorry, I have not read your book (although I ordered it online Dec 15. and it has not arrived yet. ) To me, compared to sitting back and being an "order taker" (most non-sales work), sales requires discomfort. - by RainMaker
I don't understand where you're going with that. Can you clarify?
All jobs pay. Most jobs involve work, not discomfort. I worked for years without discomfort--and also without the giant reward potential of sales. Risk and reward are closely tied. Risk requires discomfort.

One of the hardest things I find, is not only do you need to experience discomfort, but you need TO PUT YOURSELF into it. Go from comfort (sitting at desk) to discomfort (pick up that phone and start calling). It's not like you show up at work, the discomfort finds you, and then you get rewarded for enduring it. You have to take action to BRING IT ON YOURSELF. That takes guts. - by RainMaker
All jobs pay. Most jobs involve work, not discomfort.
Would you agree that even people who work at jobs they don't find uncomfortable can put out poor results because of a lack of motivation? - by AZBroker
Sorry, I have not read your book (although I ordered it online Dec 15. and it has not arrived yet. )
We ship all orders out within one business day.
If you ordered the book from the HighProbSell website, it was probably addressed wrong and/or lost in the mail. In that case, send us an email and we will send another copy out immediately via Priority Mail - at no charge. - by JacquesWerth
We ship all orders out within one business day.
If you ordered the book from the HighProbSell website, it was probably addressed wrong and/or lost in the mail. In that case, send us an email and we will send another copy out immediately via Priority Mail - at no charge.
Oh no--Jacques, I'm sorry. It was not your fault. I did not order it from your website. (Now I am sorry for that too. :re ) My point for mentioning that was only to tell you I am somewhat familiar with your book (from Gary Boye), but do not presume to make statements about it because I have not yet read it. Thank you. - by RainMaker
Would you agree that even people who work at jobs they don't find uncomfortable can put out poor results because of a lack of motivation?
Yes, I agree; but they are a small minority of exceptions.

I have been a top salesperson, senior executive, CEO and/or owner of twelve companies in eight different industries. Thus, I have been in charge of hundreds of people doing many different types of work.

In general, most people try to do a good job, are conscientious, and hard working, regardless of the type of work they do. Most private employers do not tolerate exceptions for very long. I don't. - by JacquesWerth
Would you agree that even people who work at jobs they don't find uncomfortable can put out poor results because of a lack of motivation?
YOU BET! What is their motivation to put out that extra effort? A raise someday? A plaque? A promotion? A carrot? A high-five?

My daughter goes to a public school and, sadly, it is filled with unmotivated staff with no accountability. (to be fair...not all, but many)

We are on the same page, AZ. - by RainMaker
I agree that I put off doing what I am not comfortable doing at times, prospecting. If I do this long enough I get fed up with myself, kick myself and get on the phone, or do whatever type of marketing I have been putting off. Once I get into it I remember that it really isn't that bad and I am on a roll for awhile. But, alas, after awhile I get complacent again and go back to "avoiding" what I don't like doing.

Now, my company's success is up to me 100% and I know that. If I don't sell my products I don't make money. Period! But I seem to find myself in this rollercoaster of on again off again marketing. Are there things a person like me can do to help lessen the avoidance periods?

Kathy - by TheWildBonBon
I agree that I put off doing what I am not comfortable doing at times, prospecting. If I do this long enough I get fed up with myself, kick myself and get on the phone, or do whatever type of marketing I have been putting off. Once I get into it I remember that it really isn't that bad and I am on a roll for awhile. But, alas, after awhile I get complacent again and go back to "avoiding" what I don't like doing.

Now, my company's success is up to me 100% and I know that. If I don't sell my products I don't make money. Period! But I seem to find myself in this rollercoaster of on again off again marketing. Are there things a person like me can do to help lessen the avoidance periods?
Kathy
There is an alternative to a cycle of uncomfortable prospecting and getting fed up with yourself. You could learn a method of prospecting that is both effective and enjoyable.

However, you will not learn it if you think it is impossible, if you think you should be able to figure it out for yourself, or if you think that you can learn it without effort or expense.

You might also look at whether you have a pattern of avoiding success. That is a fairly common problem for a lot of salespeople. - by JacquesWerth
I have been giving this some thought. I think my biggest challenge is how I view myself on the phone when prospecting from the other person's viewpoint (or what I think that to be). I hate it when people call me and try to sell me something. I hate it so much that I don't want to become like that and I am afraid that people I am prospecting view me like that. All I am is a voice on the phone that probably interrupted their day. How can I overcome that?

Kathy - by TheWildBonBon
I hate it when people call me and try to sell me something. I hate it so much that I don't want to become like that and I am afraid that people I am prospecting view me like that.
Quit "selling" them. Don't try to manipulate them into wanting what you have, just find out if they want it. Take a "yes" or "no" and move on to the next number.

I only hate telemarketers that don't take "NO" for an answer. They waste my time and annoy me. I am indifferent to a caller that takes a "No" and doesn't waste my time. I enjoy telemarketers that offer me something I want.

Think about why you really hate telemarketers and don't do what you really hate. - by Derek
Quit "selling" them. Don't try to manipulate them into wanting what you have, just find out if they want it. Take a "yes" or "no" and move on to the next number.

I only hate telemarketers that don't take "NO" for an answer. They waste my time and annoy me. I am indifferent to a caller that takes a "No" and doesn't waste my time. I enjoy telemarketers that offer me something I want.

Think about why you really hate telemarketers and don't do what you really hate.
Derek has it exactly right.
The most successful prospectors present a very brief (20 seconds) offer of their product or services to a very large number of prospects. An immediate Yes or No response is the offer design objective.

If the prospect says "Yes," the salesperson asks “Why?”

If the prospect says “No,” the salesperson says “Okay, goodbye.”

The result is that the salesperson spends most of their selling time with High Probability Prospects. Depending on your selling skills, that can enable you to increase their closing rate by at least 50 percent.

Each time you call the same list, with a different offer each time, the number of “Yes,” answers should increase.

This prospecting process is easy and enjoyable because there is no pressure on you or the prospect. Thus, there is hardly any rejection. - by JacquesWerth
The most successful prospectors present a very brief (20 seconds) offer of their product or services to a very large number of prospects. An immediate Yes or No response is the offer design objective.

If the prospect says "Yes," the salesperson asks “Why?”

If the prospect says “No,” the salesperson says “Okay, goodbye.”

The result is that the salesperson spends most of their selling time with High Probability Prospects. Depending on your selling skills, that can enable you to increase their closing rate by at least 50 percent.

Each time you call the same list, with a different offer each time, the number of “Yes,” answers should increase.

This prospecting process is easy and enjoyable because there is no pressure on you or the prospect. Thus, there is hardly any rejection.
I support this concept as it's written.
:wi - by SalesGuy
I support this concept as it's written.
:wi
Ditto, Jacques. This hits the nail on the head. - by RainMaker
Hmm, good point and there are days when I can get myself into the mindset that a "no" is really money in my pocket (no unneccesary marketing to someone wh isn't interested). However, the other point in my sales process that I find discouraging is the prospect who says "yes I am interested in your offer, send me info", but on the follow up isn't ready to buy and despite consistant follow up and marketing, never seems to buy. Where can go to learn better closing techniques?

Kathy - by TheWildBonBon
Hmm, good point and there are days when I can get myself into the mindset that a "no" is really money in my pocket (no unneccesary marketing to someone wh isn't interested). However, the other point in my sales process that I find discouraging is the prospect who says "yes I am interested in your offer, send me info", but on the follow up isn't ready to buy and despite consistant follow up and marketing, never seems to buy. Where can go to learn better closing techniques? Kathy
This may be very difficult to accept because, when you do it, it will result in a profound change in your beliefs and attitude about selling.

Interested prospects seldom buy.
When you eliminate the word "interested" from your vocabulary and replace it with the word "want," your sales results will improve very quickly. - by JacquesWerth
Jacques,

Sorry, I didnt' follow that. What may be difficult to accept and when I do what?

Kathy - by TheWildBonBon
Jacques,

Sorry, I didnt' follow that. What may be difficult to accept and when I do what?

Kathy
I began following Mr. Werth's suggestion over a year ago - removing the word "interested" and instead asking if this is what you "want" and sometimes add "or not" and my business life began to change and so did my self esteem as Mr. Werth said it would.

Also, I quit sending out materials - when people want something we offer oour next step is helping them get it and that includes an exchange of information meaning me being clear they match what I want and visa versa - that can be called conditions of satisfaction.

So I continue to do these things, improve on them, reflect on them and do my best from day to day to not stray from them - at the age of sixty I'd like to think that the next four decades will be the most productive and exciting.

MitchM - by MitchM
Yeah, that's the trick but you have to expand the conversatin a little beyond just taking the first yes/no or you'll find yourself accepting and expecting no answers if you don't push a little you will find yourself calling the entire phonebook for little or no results. It's more art than science but you cannot just rely on lucky chance. - by Rothgar the Pacifist
However, the other point in my sales process that I find discouraging is the prospect who says "yes I am interested in your offer, send me info", but on the follow up isn't ready to buy and despite consistant follow up and marketing, never seems to buy.
I don't know what the statistics are when it comes to conversion ratios and "send me literature" but I would guess they are quite low. - by Liberty
Thank you. That makes sense to me. I will check out the Closing the Sale Forum and the scripts. Seems I really need to look at how I am approaching my prospects and get in a different mindset. Not always easy to do, but I continue to try.

Thanks again.

Kathy - by TheWildBonBon
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