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Just got fired/let go, how to explain this to a prospective employer?

Hi all, I just recieved some shocking news that I was goign to be let go, or fired, whatever you want to call it. The reason was I had not performed up to expectation, I was not the only one who was canned either. I was working on a team of 3 on this project and without going into too many details, I think no one decided to take charge of this project and although I had tried to a few times, I did not want to take the chances of upsetting my co-workers by sounding too bossy but I was aware that we needed to get a move on some things. Well I waited too late and unfortunely although I had been putting alot of effort, what we needed to get done just wasn't getting done and in my bosses eyes he assumed we were just not coming to work. No sense in arguing with him, i just accepted it and left. My question is: how do I explain this to a company I am interviewing for right now as I am in the 3rd stage of the interview process with them and they think I'm still working for this company b/c I was still there during my 1st and 2nd interview. Should I just tell them or should I not say anything and hope that they don't call for a reference check? Well if I learned anything from this experience and can give advice to anyone in the same position, never be afraid to be a leader and take charge of a group project. Although doing so in my case may have gotten my co-workers annoyed with me, I may still have a job right now. - by halidon
Is the job you are interviewing for in the same line of sales, or different? If is different, then it will be easier to address. Not all jobs are right for everyone--even great employees. I'm guessing you don't think they have contacted your former employer yet. Did you have a good relationship with any of your bosses, even though it didn't really work out?

As a former employer to many employees in the past, I always looked at the employee as a person--trying to make it. If they didn't lie, cheat, or steal, and after they were gone, I always tried to help them find decent employment by giving a decent reference. If they were not great, I didn't get into detail. I would emphasize their good qualities, and if asked if I would re-hire them, I would state that they were not right for my particular job, but was sure there were other jobs they would be fine at.

Also, if they were the worst employee ever (this does not relate to you, Halidon) and I was contacted by a direct competitor for a reference--I gave them a glowing reference. ;st

As to whether come clean or leave it lurking...that is a tough call. First I would try to find someone at the old place who will help you by giving you a decent reference. For ME, it would depend on the report I had with the new company. I would be inclined to come clean if you could present a good counter reason to hire you. They may respect and admire you for that.

In fairness, (and brutal honesty) however, I have been hired for jobs where most of my resume was fabricated--and pulled it off without a hitch. Sorry for the ambiguity. Those are just my honest thoughts and opinions. Good luck. - by RainMaker
Thanks for the feedback. That is interesting you were a former employer, that gives a some credibility to your optinion I think. The previous job i has was for inside sales, the one i'm interviewing for is outside sales, sort of different. The company i'm interviewing with knows about my current situation, that I hadnt been extremley happy with inside sales b/c it just wasn't my cup of tea, and that's why I was interviewing with them for a new position in outside sales. So I was thinking something like this might work "I decided to resign b/c I am set on finding something else and I did not see the point in continuing on with the current project if I was going to leave midway through the process" So, I tell them that yes, I'm no longer there, but I don't tell them I was involuntarily let go. What do you think? - by halidon
So I was thinking something like this might work "I decided to resign b/c I am set on finding something else and I did not see the point in continuing on with the current project if I was going to leave midway through the process" So, I tell them that yes, I'm no longer there, but I don't tell them I was involuntarily let go. What do you think?
If you are going to come clean with them, I'd probably recommend that you present it as a mutual agreement. Afterall, if you had already been offered the new job, it would have been YOUR decision--not their's. The timing worked against you, but they don't have to know that. If they like you and believe you--they should hire you. If you really want the job and think you will be successful at it, then it will work to everyone's advantage. - by RainMaker
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