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Win-Win Result.

Is it possible when negotiating to always end up with a win-win senario? Are there situations where you abandon hope for a win-win result and just try to make sure you don't end up on the losing end? - by Doc MC
Is it possible when negotiating to always end up with a win-win senario? Are there situations where you abandon hope for a win-win result and just try to make sure you don't end up on the losing end?
IMO, "Win-Win" means that both parties are satisfied with the outcome. Maybe not delighted, but on the whole "satisfied." If one party is satisfied with not being on the losing end then that is a "Win-Win" situation. ;) - by SalesCoach
Are there situations where you abandon hope for a win-win result and just try to make sure you don't end up on the losing end?
I've been in those situations. I call it "Damage Control." :eek: - by SpeedRacer
I've been in those situations. I call it "Damage Control." :eek:
I'll second that. ;)

IMO, the idea that negotiations have to be "win-win" ranks right up there with "the customer is always right." :( - by Vince
Is it possible when negotiating to always end up with a win-win senario? Are there situations where you abandon hope for a win-win result and just try to make sure you don't end up on the losing end?
IMO, that scenario is not always possible or plausible. For instance, I'm currently negotiating a trademark infringement dispute where the best the client can hope for is to not lose his intellectual property. - by Rocket
Is it possible when negotiating to always end up with a win-win senario? Are there situations where you abandon hope for a win-win result and just try to make sure you don't end up on the losing end?
An old thread that might bear reopening.

There is a common assumption that win-win is an effective strategy in negotiation. I believe that it isn't. - by Gary Boye
"Win-Win"? Ba humbug!

That sounds like what the guy on the wrong end of the stick would preach. ;) - by Jackie
There is a common assumption that win-win is an effective strategy in negotiation. I believe that it isn't.
I agree that it is not necessarily the best strategy, but assuming you are negotiating the details of a sale and you would like to maintain a relationship with the client or are hoping for a referal. Ending with both parties happy with their side of the deal is beneficial. Quite honestly, there are people out there who just want to win in a negotiation, but that does not always work out to be the best deal for the long term. I guess it's a matter of perspective. Why do you not think that a win-win result is ideal? - by Doc MC
Why do you not think that a win-win result is ideal?
I didn't say that. I think it's as ideal as those settings on a Currier and Ives Christmas card. I have been part of a lot of win-win results. I was referring to win-win strategy in negotiation.

If I was in a room with a hundred buyers, and I was the sole seller, I think a win-win philosophy would make me the loneliest person in that room.

I like car salespeople. I find a lot of true professionals among them. But when I'm out to buy a car, the dealer winning is not really a priority with me.

I guess what I am trying to say is that a negotiating table has two sides. If only one side is committed to win-win, the double standard puts that side at a real disadvantage. - by Gary Boye
I always negotiate on business value, rather than monies alone. I find that trading on value creates a better situation than the elusive win-win. Using a 4 step process in negotiation, and working on that system of has proven to be effective and better each time I use it. - by cs_obd
Using a 4 step process in negotiation, and working on that system of has proven to be effective and better each time I use it.
Can you elaborate on your 4 step process? :) - by SalesGuy
Yes,

The 4 step process of quantifiable negotiation is as follows:

1. Estimating the Negotiation - What are the actual issues of the negotiation? What is the CNA (Consequence of No Agreement)
2. Validating the Estimation - Fact finding verification of assessments
3. Creating Value - Development of a few strategic deals (2 - High, Low, Medium) all addressing the key attributes of the negotiation in addition to other benfits
4. Dividing Value - Multiple Equal Offers (MEO); providing more value and choices to the buyer than expected

This is only a brief overview of the strategic negotiations system, but I hope it helps. What is important from this angle in negotiating is the system itself. Like a Franchise that builds it foundation on its "Way of operating a ???? Business", this negotiation process feeds off testing, refining, testing, refining, etc etc. - by cs_obd
This is only a brief overview of the strategic negotiations system, but I hope it helps.
Great information. Is this a system you developed? - by Houston
Hi Houston,

The system has been developed and researched by top business minds: Brian J. Dietmeyer, Max H. Bazerman from Think! Inc. The firm Think! Inc assists corporations in International negotiations.

I have been using the 4 step process for some time now, and have seen and continue to see vast improvements with my dealings with clients. We are made to believe that negotiating is a skill only a few possess, but with the research they have done, and the refinement of the process, you can transform your skills to that of a "Worldclass Negotiator."

Hope that helps :) - by cs_obd
Yes,

The 4 step process of quantifiable negotiation is as follows:

1. Estimating the Negotiation - What are the actual issues of the negotiation? What is the CNA (Consequence of No Agreement)
2. Validating the Estimation - Fact finding verification of assessments
3. Creating Value - Development of a few strategic deals (2 - High, Low, Medium) all addressing the key attributes of the negotiation in addition to other benfits
4. Dividing Value - Multiple Equal Offers (MEO); providing more value and choices to the buyer than expected
cs_obd:
I'm lost on #4. Can you provide me with a little more information, and perhaps a simple example as to how that brings about an advantage. I've always thought that multiple offers can stall proceedings. But my frames of reference may be off base.

Thanks. - by Gary Boye
CS,

Is there a website or other reference where we could learn more about quantifiable negotiation?
Kathleen - by KSA-Mktg
Thats the point of negotiation, if I can't see the win-win result I turn away and find a better business opportunity.

There is not always a win-win result. - by Sanddollar
Quite honestly, there are people out there who just want to win in a negotiation, but that does not always work out to be the best deal for the long term. I guess it's a matter of perspective. Why do you not think that a win-win result is ideal?
Nice Doc,
I suppose it all depends on what industry your in.

If your company lives and dies by fostering "long term"relationships with other companies, then an imbalanced agreement/contract, in the long run, is doomed to failure. Yout competitors will see to that!

(sorry to deviate from the 4 step thing) - by ginoayn
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