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101 Sales Management Myths

I'm writing a new book entitled 101 Sales Management Myths. With 78 of the myths and techniques that replace or overcome them completed, I'm having a writers block. Ideas please? - by Virden J. Thornton
I'm writing a new book entitled 101 Sales Management Myths. With 78 of the myths and techniques that replace or overcome them completed, I'm having a writers block. Ideas please?
I guess I'd have to ask, what do have so far? - by Liberty
Areas of hiring myths, training myths, territory mangement myths, pay plan myths, coaching myths,

The following is an excerpt from a draft of a myth that i worked on this morning:

76. The “80/20 Rule” Myth:

The 80/20 rule in sales is not a myth. Believing that it is inevitable and that all sales organizations must live with an 80 percent of the sales team selling only 20 percent of your products or services is the myth!

This manual was written to help sales manager eliminate the literally hundreds of management myths that lead to an 80/20 configuration of a sales force. As you have read in these pages, developing a 100 percent sales team starts with hiring the right people and then training and coaching them to to become 100 percenters. If you have read this far in this manual, then you now have dozens of proven techniques and systems to help you eliminate the 80/20 rule in your organization. Remember, that the 80/20 rule dies hard. You will need to work dilligently at eliminating it and then not allowing it to resurface.

Good Luck! - by Virden J. Thornton
Have you got something about, "If it isn't broke don't fix it" in there? Or, how about "The customer is always right"? - by Liberty
Have the first one but not the second.

Thanks for your input - by Virden J. Thornton
Areas of hiring myths, training myths, territory mangement myths, pay plan myths, coaching myths,

The following is an excerpt from a draft of a myth that i worked on this morning:

76. The “80/20 Rule” Myth:

The 80/20 rule in sales is not a myth. Believing that it is inevitable and that all sales organizations must live with an 80 percent of the sales team selling only 20 percent of your products or services is the myth!

This manual was written to help sales manager eliminate the literally hundreds of management myths that lead to an 80/20 configuration of a sales force. As you have read in these pages, developing a 100 percent sales team starts with hiring the right people and then training and coaching them to to become 100 percenters. If you have read this far in this manual, then you now have dozens of proven techniques and systems to help you eliminate the 80/20 rule in your organization. Remember, that the 80/20 rule dies hard. You will need to work dilligently at eliminating it and then not allowing it to resurface.

Good Luck!
Look closely in your own post and you might find a popular myth. It's the one that suggests that sales managers are necessarily competent sales trainers and/or sales coaches. - by Gary Boye
... It's the one that suggests that sales managers are necessarily competent sales trainers and/or sales coaches.
How about the myth that top salespeople make good sales managers? - by Frankie
Two great ideas. Thank you. - by Virden J. Thornton
Gary is this what you were thinking?

81. The “Sales Success Takes Hand’s On Management” Myth:

In a small midwestern town, the local high school of 878 students recently produced its first state championship basketball team in over 90 years. The community has had an organized city basketball league for its younger boys for many years. But, this league, designed to spot talent early and then feed the high school basketball program, did nothing to produce the state title. There is also an open gym at the high school every Tuesday and Thursday night to encourage the young men in the community to play basketball. But like the city league, this open gym contributed nothing to the team in its championship bid.

A local banker, a former 6’ 8” college all-star, has volunteered his services for one dollar a year to assist the high school’s coaching staff. The boy’s varsity basketball program also has an able assistant coach. But these two accomplished assistant coaches, like the city league and the open gym, were of no value in helping the varsity team win the state title. The reason these community programs and an extra coach had little effect in producing the state title, was that the state championship was won by the high school’s girls varsity basketball team not the boys.

Everyone in town, with the exception of the school’s administration, can see that the failure of the boy’s varsity basketball program lies with the head coach. The girl’s coach is a woman who is tough but fair, a coach who works hard to build self-esteem and confidence in each member of her squad. She teaches the fundamentals, drills her team for skill and then empowers each of her players to make decisions on the court that will get the job done. The confidence she has developed in each member of the team gave the girl’s varsity baqsketball tesm the ability, under extreme pressure, to put up the winning shot at the final buzzer, to take the state championship.

On the other hand, the boy’s varsity head coach is a tyrant who literally destroys his players by trying to mold them into an antiquated defensive system that fails to capitalize on each of the boy’s strengths. He makes all the decisions in a game and directs each play by running up and down the sidelines shouting at the players on the court. He pulls members of the team out of the game for making minor mistakes and then has them sit the bench as a punishment. This action alone reinforces the negative and heightens the fear levels in his players. As a result, the boy’s team rarely lives up to its potential or the investment in time, talent, and money the community has made in the boy’s varsity basketball program.

Ralph Waldo Emerson has written that an organization “is the extended shadow of one man.” As this example of the two high school basketball coaches illustrates, it is the extended shadow of the coach that makes a winning or a losing basketball team. At the supervisory level in your company or firm, it is the extended shadow of the sales manager or business developmsent officer, more than any other single element that is the key to developing an effective sales culture and consistent sales success. Which of the two coaches, discussed above, does your shadow resemble? - by Virden J. Thornton
Gary is this what you were thinking?
Sure. Your story illustrates leadership in two modes: weak--and strong.

I'm a firm believer that in any good organization, leadership changes hands in accordance with the task to be performed. Think of a organizational chart not as an hierarchal "tree", but as a circle.

Weak organizations often suffer from the stigma of the majority compensating for the few. In your example of the coach/tyrant/weak leader, it would be very difficult for the boys on the team, regardless of ability, to compensate for his incompetence. - by Gary Boye
"Money is a good motivator for employees" and "There is one right way to manage employees" - by Thomas
I have your first myth written but the second is a keeper. Thanks Thomas. you are appreciated! - by Virden J. Thornton
I appreciated the input from the membership. Several myths in the manual have been written from the suggestions made in this forum. This self-directed learning manual has been published in a pdf format. For all mambers of the forum, you can obtain a copy for a $20 discount over the bound version at www.TheSellingEdge.com/myths2.htm - by Virden J. Thornton
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