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Credibility and Trust

What does everyone do to establish credibility or trust during a sales call? Do you have any special methods or techniques that you recommend? - by Iceman
There are things you can do and not do that will help. I wouldn't talk bad about others or disclose private information about others. I would admit it when I didn't know something or if I've made a mistake instead of hiding it. - by Marcus
What does everyone do to establish credibility or trust during a sales call? Do you have any special methods or techniques that you recommend?
Talk in terms of the other person's interests instead of your own. This translates to giving a tailored presentation based on the clients wants and needs instead of generic presentation. :) - by Liberty
I wouldn't talk bad about others or disclose private information about others.
I like Dale Carnegie's idea; "Don't criticize, condemn, or complain". - by Mikey
How about establishing trust by establishing rapport. ;) - by Milton
What does everyone do to establish credibility or trust during a sales call? Do you have any special methods or techniques that you recommend?
Be oneself.

It is for that reason that I place much greater vaue on identifying conditions of mutual trust and respect than attempting to create them. - by Gary Boye
Be oneself.

It is for that reason that I place much greater vaue on identifying conditions of mutual trust and respect than attempting to create them.
How do you do that? - by Iceman
How do you do that?
I know if I trust and respect someone. In simple terms, I can assess another person's level of trust and respect for me by their behavour with me. So that covers both ends of the "mutual" conditions. - by Gary Boye
I know if I trust and respect someone. In simple terms, I can assess another person's level of trust and respect for me by their behavour with me. So that covers both ends of the "mutual" conditions.
That is interesting. How would someone else do this? - by Iceman
That is interesting. How would someone else do this?
I'm interested too. Please explain. :) - by Seth
Iceman and Seth, I think what Gary is saying that he decides whether or not he trusts the prospect and if the prospect trusts him. - by Agent Smith
I'm interested too. Please explain. :)
I don't understand the requests. I'm sincerely sorry. Explain what exactly?

Is this something that either of you feel that you can't do and have an interest in learning? Is it about the part about assessing one's own's feelings of trust and/or respect towards another---or observing the behavour of another to determine whether they trust and respect you?

I don't know if I would be qualified to teach either of those things to anyone who felt they couldn't do them. At least I never have. Perhaps it's something born of experience. I don't think I have any inherent gift in that regard.

Agent Smith is correct in what he said. I wish I could be more helpful. - by Gary Boye
I don't understand the requests. I'm sincerely sorry. Explain what exactly?

Is this something that either of you feel that you can't do and have an interest in learning? Is it about the part about assessing one's own's feelings of trust and/or respect towards another---or observing the behavour of another to determine whether they trust and respect you?

I don't know if I would be qualified to teach either of those things to anyone who felt they couldn't do them. At least I never have. Perhaps it's something born of experience. I don't think I have any inherent gift in that regard.

Agent Smith is correct in what he said. I wish I could be more helpful.
I think that it would be hard to sell someone on an idea, for instance, if they don't trust you or what you say.

It makes sense to me that the more trust between you and the prospect the better which is why I asked about the different ways to do this.

You said you placed greater vaue on identifying conditions of mutual trust and respect than attempting to create them. If that means you personally decide if you trust the prospect and if the prospect trusts you then I understand.

If this trust isn't already there do you try to establish trust? - by Iceman
Iceman and Seth, I think what Gary is saying that he decides whether or not he trusts the prospect and if the prospect trusts him.
If you meet a prospect for the first time and that prospect doesn't know anything about you, your company, or your product then what would be the basis for trusting you? - by Seth
Trust and respect can be developed. No question about it.

It would be great if you already had a mutual trust and respect with your prospects but that will not always be the case. So what do you do? You give the prospect a reason to trust and respect you.

Think of it like this...
  • Do you T/R people with shifty eyes and/or won't look you in the eyes during a discussion?
  • Do you T/R peope who say one thing but act another way?
  • Do you T/R people who talk about others?
  • Do you T/R people who don't respect your time and show up late?
  • Do you T/R people who come across as loud and obnoxious?
  • Do you T/R people who don't actively listen to you?
  • Do you T/R people who don't seem to understand you and your situation?
  • Do you T/R people that don't seem to have your best interests at heart?
  • etc, etc, etc.
- by SalesGuy
I think that it would be hard to sell someone on an idea, for instance, if they don't trust you or what you say.

It makes sense to me that the more trust between you and the prospect the better which is why I asked about the different ways to do this.

You said you placed greater vaue on identifying conditions of mutual trust and respect than attempting to create them. If that means you personally decide if you trust the prospect and if the prospect trusts you then I understand.

If this trust isn't already there do you try to establish trust?
Your question clarifies where you're coming from, I think. Thanks.

To answer your question: Most often not, unless I detect a miscue in communication.

Please understand that I am not a person that faces distrust on a regular basis. So establishing trust through an interview or sales conversation process is not high on my list of priorities. Disqualifying prospects if conditions of mutual trust and respect don't exist would be a priority.

By the way, there is a wonderful new book on selling that covers something very similar to this. Michael port recently wrote Book Yourself Solid which I recommend highly. In it he discusses the need to decide who we want as our clients and who we don't. He calls it "the velvet rope".

Among those who would not be allowed past my personal velvet rope would be people who don't trust me, people who are disrespectful, people who lie, people I don't trust, people I don't respect, and people who procrastinate.

The good part for me has been there are so darn many people to talk to who do not fall into those categories.

Hope that clarifies at least a little. - by Gary Boye
If you meet a prospect for the first time and that prospect doesn't know anything about you, your company, or your product then what would be the basis for trusting you?
That's a good question.

But I think that there could be too many possible answers because distrust can stem from many things. Among them could be their upbringing, their general attitude towards their fellow man, possible fear, bad experiences in the past, a distrustful nature, negative transference, untrustworthiness on their own part...and I'm sure many many more.

Many years ago I discovered I could make more money if I didn't compensate for others. To do so would keep me from spending my time with better prospects which I choose to do. Confession: Selling is a lot of fun but I'm in it for the money and always have been.

Many choose a different philosophy than my own, of course. It's a free country. - by Gary Boye
Trust and respect can be developed. No question about it.

It would be great if you already had a mutual trust and respect with your prospects but that will not always be the case. So what do you do? You give the prospect a reason to trust and respect you.

Think of it like this...
  • Do you T/R people with shifty eyes and/or won't look you in the eyes during a discussion?
  • Do you T/R peope who say one thing but act another way?
  • Do you T/R people who talk about others?
  • Do you T/R people who don't respect your time and show up late?
  • Do you T/R people who come across as loud and obnoxious?
  • Do you T/R people who don't actively listen to you?
  • Do you T/R people who don't seem to understand you and your situation?
  • Do you T/R people that don't seem to have your best interests at heart?
  • etc, etc, etc.
If a prospect exhibited any or all of those traits to me, I would probably disqualify him/her.

Although I have had some clients that were loud and obnoxious...and I'm glad I kept them. They kept their word and had a lot of other virtues.

What would you do? - by Gary Boye
If a prospect exhibited any or all of those traits to me, I would probably disqualify him/her.
Then it's probably a safe bet that if a salesperson exhibited any of those traits the prospect might disqualify him/her. That's the point. - by SalesGuy
Please understand that I am not a person that faces distrust on a regular basis.
Do you agree that the general public is distrusting of salespeople on the whole? - by Iceman
Then it's probably a safe bet that if a salesperson exhibited any of those traits the prospect might disqualify him/her. That's the point.
I sure would.

So to take your perspective one step further, are you suggesting that the key to establishing trust and respect, for those who are inclined to focus on that, is to not do those things? Or something more? - by Gary Boye
So to take you perspective one step further, are you suggesting that the key to establishing trust and respect, for those who are inclined to focus on that, is to not do those things? Or something more?
I am suggesting that there are many things a salesperson can do that to help (or hurt) in the trust department. Or put another way, people are more inclined to trust those people who do not exhibit the characteristics I outlined earlier. - by SalesGuy
I am suggesting that there are many things a salesperson can do that to help (or hurt) in the trust department. Or put another way, people are more inclined to trust those people who do not exhibit the characteristics I outlined earlier.
I would hope that everybody here doesn't exhibit those characteristics. They are certainly terrible things for a salesperson to do.

So would you say that in the absence of those things, trust and respect from the prospect would usually exist? - by Gary Boye
Many choose a different philosophy than my own, of course. It's a free country.
I appreciate that. It sounds like you have found what works for your situation. :) - by Seth
I would hope that everybody here doesn't exhibit those characteristics. They are certainly terrible things for a salesperson to do.
I deliberately chose some of the more common offenses I've witnessed salespeople commit. ;)

So would you say that in the absence of those things, trust and respect from the prospect would usually exist?
Not at all. To answer Iceman's question, I think the general public is very distrusting of salespeople and for good reason. - by SalesGuy
Salesguy, what do you think is the easiest way to establish trust? - by Iceman
Salesguy, what do you think is the easiest way to establish trust?
Transference of trust through an introduction or referral. - by SalesGuy
I deliberately chose some of the more common offenses I've witnessed salespeople commit. ;)

Not at all. To answer Iceman's question, I think the general public is very distrusting of salespeople and for good reason.
Even though a large segment of the general public are salespeople themselves?

What good reason are you referring to? Is it among the ones you listed?

I hate to bombard you with these questions, but I don't think of the sales profession that way. I have always been proud to be in it at any level.

I do know that there are a few bad eggs in any field--not just sales. - by Gary Boye
I hate to bombard you with these questions, but I don't think of the sales profession that way. I have always been proud to be in it at any level.
I welcome questions from you and everyone else. With that said, I recall you mentioning on several occassions your knowledge and experience in the field of sales. Are you seriously not aware of the public's perception of salespeople in general? - by SalesGuy
Transference of trust through an introduction or referral.
I agree. Just checking to see if we're on the same wavelength. ;co - by Iceman
I agree. Just checking to see if we're on the same wavelength.
Based on nothing more than my posts would you say you trust and respect me? - by SalesGuy
Based on nothing more than my posts would you say you trust and respect me?
To an extent, sure. :) - by Iceman
To an extent, sure. :)
That's the way it works. ;) - by SalesGuy
That's the way it works. ;)
That's the way what works? - by Iceman
That's the way what works?
Credibility and Trust.

Based on your interpretation of my posts you might feel that I am a credible source and can be trusted when it comes to information on personal selling. You trust me to an extent... to the extent that we're talking about personal selling. This does not infer that you would trust me with your financing, your car repair, or even mowing your yard. Trust, and credibility, has bounderies. - by SalesGuy
Trust, and credibility, has bounderies.
I hadn't thought about it like that. Good point. ;co - by Iceman
In my opinion, "Trust" is a vital element in personal selling. I am not convinced that the general salesperson realizes this or understands what role their behavior plays in establishing and/or diminishing trust with others. - by SalesGuy
This has been a great thread. I'd just like to add "believability" to the list. :) - by Marcus
In my opinion, "Trust" is a vital element in personal selling. I am not convinced that the general salesperson realizes this or understands what role their behavior plays in establishing and/or diminishing trust with others.
I am not convinced either. :( - by Milton
I welcome questions from you and everyone else. With that said, I recall you mentioning on several occassions your knowledge and experience in the field of sales. Are you seriously not aware of the public's perception of salespeople in general?
Well I should hope you welcome questions. But you don't always answer them.

Based only on the information from your posts, I'm aware that I don't always agree with your perceptions on selling. That's no big deal. If everbody agreed with one another here, nobody would show up.

In this particular instance, if you are implying that the general public's perception of salespeople in general agrees with yours, I would say that is incorrect.

Please don't be offended. I'm just being honest in my statements...and I think that's always a good thing.

And, you didn't ask...but I do trust and respect you. Agreement is not always a prerequisite...I'm sure you know. - by Gary Boye
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