Home > Resistance > Sales Technique - That's really a great product but we don't need it at the moment!

Sales Technique - That's really a great product but we don't need it at the moment!

Now this is a resistance that I usually encounter when I was selling books. For me, this is a very hard resistance for it is in grey area. I could handle really negative resistances but not grey areas. This is a resistance normally made by professionals in order not to embarass the salesperson. When this kind of question have been asked to me, I'm already at a loss what to say next.

What I normally tell them, "You will need in the future, why not buy it now? But that doesn't actually work for they usually just smile in return and that's it. Anyone got any good answers in handling this kind of grey area resistance? - by encoder
What about the prospect's response is in a grey area? - by SalesGuy
Actually, I get this a lot as well in my business - selling executive marketing services to help professionals make a defined move in their careers. We might have an interested prospect who feels that they can use their own resources to find their next job, rather than pay for ours. There are just certain things they won't pay for - finding a job is one of them. They often come back to us later. I wonder if this is akin to the "sense of urgency" thread.

--Scott - by Dixon Hill
I wonder if this is akin to the "sense of urgency" thread.
If the reason the customer feels he/she doesn't need it at the moment is because he/she can always fall back on your services later then yeah that sounds like no sense of urgency... otherwise it sounds like a lack of want/desire to me. - by Calvin
If the reason the customer feels he/she doesn't need it at the moment is because he/she can always fall back on your services later then yeah that sounds like no sense of urgency... otherwise it sounds like a lack of want/desire to me.
Not to be a wise guy, but what's the difference between no urgency and no want/desire? If the prospect is inquiring about the service/product, wouldn't desire be implied? If they're inquiring, one would assume there's interest, if there's interest, one would assume there's desire. How does the salesperson move prospects from desire to urgency; from prospect to client?

--Scott - by Dixon Hill
Not to be a wise guy, but what's the difference between no urgency and no want/desire? If the prospect is inquiring about the service/product, wouldn't desire be implied? If they're inquiring, one would assume there's interest, if there's interest, one would assume there's desire. How does the salesperson move prospects from desire to urgency; from prospect to client?

--Scott
This might help illustrate the differences Scott.

{Interest}One day John Consumer is watching television and sees a commercial about a revolutionary new computer on display at the local electronics store. John isn't necessarily in the market for a new computer but the next day on his way home from work he decides to stop by the electronics store and see what all the fuss is about.

{Desire}While at the store John talks with a salesperson and after a series of sales questions and a presentation of the laptops capabilities John decides that he really wants one of these new computers.

{Lack of Urgency}The salesperson asks for the sale and John's response is that while he does want one of these new computers he doesn't actually need one at the moment. John assures the salesperson that as soon as his current computer gives out he is coming right back and picking up one of these new models.

{Sense of Urgency}The saleperson points out to John that there is currently an unadvertised "one-time-only" "crazy low price" sale on the computer however it ends that night and is limited to stock on hand. The salesperson goes on to inform John that an hour earlier he had checked availability for another customer, who said he would be back before closing, and there was only one unit remaining in stock.

The salesperson once again asks for the sale but this time John, not wanting to miss out on a great deal, says "yes" and buys the computer. - by SalesGuy
{Desire}While at the store John talks with a salesperson and after a series of sales questions and a presentation of the laptops capabilities John decides that he really wants one of these new computers.
"SPIN" questions no doubt. ;bg - by Frankie
Not to be a wise guy, but what's the difference between no urgency and no want/desire?
I don't want it vs. I don't want it now.

If the prospect is inquiring about the service/product, wouldn't desire be implied?
No, just interest. - by Calvin
"SPIN" questions no doubt.
Sure. Why not. ;) - by SalesGuy
Thanks Calvin. So using SPIN questions can "drive" the prospect from interest to desire and a sense of urgency?

--Scott

--Oops, originally posted prior to Salesguy's post. - by Dixon Hill
I don't want it vs. I don't want it now.
Exactly! :) - by SalesGuy
Did that illustration help Scott? - by SalesGuy
It did; thanks.

--Scott - by Dixon Hill
So using SPIN questions can "drive" the prospect from interest to desire and a sense of urgency?
Sure, why not. ;)

Are you familiar with the SPIN questions? - by SalesGuy
Are you familiar with the SPIN questions?
I am; I've read Rackham's book and try to use them in my work.

Here's something that I think is relate