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AIDA Model

I've been educating myself online ;sm and have a question about the AIDA model. Here is a definition -
Attention, Interest, Desire, Action. This is a traditional model of the purpose and flow of marketing communications and direct sales efforts:
1. Create attention;
2. Generate interest;
3. Develop desire;
4. Initiate action.
I don't remember exactly which ones but some of the old sales books I've read said to use AIDA when selling. I might have even read that here. Is that a good model to follow? - by Thomas
AIDA is for advertising copy not personal selling. I think. :hu - by Marcus
I've been educating myself online ;sm and have a question about the AIDA model. Here is a definition - I don't remember exactly which ones but some of the old sales books I've read said to use AIDA when selling. I might have even read that here. Is that a good model to follow?
AIDA is used as an acronym, but much more common is AIDCA, which adds the word Conviction into the model.

It is a classic model in advertising. It has also been used many times as a learning model for selling, and for sales presentations.

The Dale Carnegie Sales Course (not the public speaking course) used AIDCA as a model for teaching sales.

I have felt for several years that, consistent with the Acronym, "agreement" is more strategically sound then "attention". In other words, establishing common ground early. Naturally, that usually gets "attention".

I don't think AIDCA works as a selling system per se, but it is an adequate learning model in my opinion.

Thomas, you might want to use AIDCA rather than AIDA in your online search. It should bear fruit. - by Gary Boye
Is that a good model to follow?
Food for thought Thomas:
  • Attention - If they are not paying attention then they are not listening.
  • Interest - Talk in terms of the other persons interests; their wants or needs.
  • Desire - Show them how your product/service is the solution of choice. Build desire.
  • Action - If they don't take action you have no sale. Help them take action.
These are the basics. These alone could be and probably have been the starting point for many "selling systems". - by Agent Smith
These are the basics. These alone could be and probably have been the starting point for many "selling systems".
What is the starting point? :cu - by Thomas
What is the starting point? :cu
The AIDA model is a good starting point or framework for a selling system. It makes sense to structure a selling system around a model of the typical buyer decision process.

If you look close enough you're likely to find AIDA lurking in the background of almost every selling system today.

Does this structure look familiar?

A - Attention... aka Approach
I - Interest... aka Interview
D - Desire... aka Presentation
A - Action... aka Commitment
*S - Satisfaction (Customer satisfaction leading to repeat and referral business.) - by Agent Smith
If you look close enough you're likely to find AIDA lurking in the background of almost every selling system today.
I believe that is true, although I have occasionally seen authors and trainers attempt to dispute it. - by Gary Boye
AIDA is for advertising copy not personal selling. I think. :hu
Personal Selling Example: Ticket Scalping
"Hey you!" - Attention
"Are you looking for tickets to the game?" - Interest
"I have two tickets in the fourth row for $100." - Desire
"Do you want them?" - Action - by AZBroker
Personal Selling Example: Ticket Scalping
"Hey you!" - Attention
"Are you looking for tickets to the game?" - Interest
"I have two tickets in the fourth row for $100." - Desire
"Do you want them?" - Action
I stand corrected. :hu;bg - by Marcus
Thomas you might give "AIUAPR" a try in your online search. ;) - by SalesGuy
Someone told me that AIDA mirrors the way people make their buying decisions, What goes on in their minds, so businesses subsequently used it to market and advertise their products. Using it to sell would seem to make pretty good sense. - by marky
A general model of the buyer decision process consists of the following steps:
  1. Want recognition;
  2. Search of information on products that could satisfy the needs of the buyer;
  3. Alternative selection;
  4. Decision-making on buying the product;
  5. Post-purchase behavior
- by BossMan
Someone told me that AIDA mirrors the way people make their buying decisions, What goes on in their minds, so businesses subsequently used it to market and advertise their products. Using it to sell would seem to make pretty good sense.
That is right.
The buying decision research was conducted in the late 1940s by the big three American Automobile Manufacturers. The result was called the “Five Step Buying Decision Model. The actual results were “AIDCA” – Attention, Interest, Desire, Conviction and Action (close) - not “AIDA.”

In the 1950s, many companies in various industries developed sales systems based on the research. For their own reasons, some of them decided to eliminate the Conviction step.

The intention of the developers of those sales systems was to manipulate people’s minds through the five decision steps. Over the years, the biggest problem with AIDCA has been the resistance caused by manipulation. Nevertheless, most of those systems worked far better than previous selling systems.

However, since the 1980s, the AIDCA model has gradually become obsolete due to the rapidly increasing phenomena of “Information Overload.” - by JacquesWerth
The buying decision research was conducted in the late 1940s by the big three American Automobile Manufacturers. The result was called the “Five Step Buying Decision Model. The actual results were “AIDCA” – Attention, Interest, Desire, Conviction and Action (close) - not “AIDA.” ...
Not only historically accurate, but a great overview which describes the evolution of a significant part of the philosophy behind sales systems. - by Gary Boye
However, since the 1980s, the AIDCA model has gradually become obsolete due to the rapidly increasing phenomena of “Information Overload.”
Obsolete? How would you say the buying decision process has changed as a result of "information overload"? - by AZBroker
That is right.
The buying decision research was conducted in the late 1940s by the big three American Automobile Manufacturers. The result was called the “Five Step Buying Decision Model. The actual results were “AIDCA” – Attention, Interest, Desire, Conviction and Action (close) - not “AIDA.”
Jacques, to my knowledge, the "AIDA" model dates back to the late 1800's. ;wi

In 1898, the American advertising and sales pioneer, E. St. Elmo Lewis developed a practical sales tool using the latest Scientific Management insights. He created his AIDA funnel model on customer studies in the US life insurance market to explain the mechanisms of personal selling. Lewis held that the most successful salespeople followed a hierarchical, four layer process using the four cognitive phases that buyers follow when accepting a new idea or purchasing a new product.
- by SalesGuy
Jacques, to my knowledge, the "AIDA" model dates back to the late 1800's. ;wi
That may be so.
The first written mention of AIDA that I could find was in a 1934 testbook titled (I think) "Fundamentals of Professional Selling" by John Russell et al, the latter being five other college professors. However, it wasn't until the car maker study in the late 1940s that it was scientifically verified and amended to "AIDCA." That's when it took off.

I first learned AIDCA it in 1953 when I majored in Industrial Sales for my first college degree. - by JacquesWerth
Jacques, earlier you mentioned that "...the AIDCA model has gradually become obsolote due to the rapidly increasing phenomena of "Information Overload."

How in your opinion has "information overload" led to this outcome? - by AZBroker
Jacques, earlier you mentioned that "...the AIDCA model has gradually become obsolote due to the rapidly increasing phenomena of "Information Overload." How in your opinion has "information overload" led to this outcome?
Information Overload results in the average American being exposed to over 12 million informational messages per year. The vast majority of those messages get filtered out before they ever reach your consciousmind.

Those people that have a perceived need for the benefits of your products and services open their mind filters to "solutions" that have the potential to satisfy their needs. They have already gone through Attention, Interest and Desire before you showed up. Then, it is a matter of which of the needs has top priority that makes them into High Probability Prospects, or not.

We do not ignore the Interest or Desire steps, but we limit those discussions to verification during the initial steps of the sales process.

When you spend your time only with High Probability Prospects, your primary focus should be on the Conviction and Action steps. We deal with those steps with two processes that we call the Trust and Respect Inquiry and Conditions of Satisfaction. - by JacquesWerth
Great insight. I can agree with everything you said Jacques. - by AZBroker
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