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AIDA Model

I've been educating myself online ;sm and have a question about the AIDA model. Here is a definition -
Attention, Interest, Desire, Action. This is a traditional model of the purpose and flow of marketing communications and direct sales efforts:
1. Create attention;
2. Generate interest;
3. Develop desire;
4. Initiate action.
I don't remember exactly which ones but some of the old sales books I've read said to use AIDA when selling. I might have even read that here. Is that a good model to follow? - by Thomas
AIDA is for advertising copy not personal selling. I think. :hu - by Marcus
I've been educating myself online ;sm and have a question about the AIDA model. Here is a definition - I don't remember exactly which ones but some of the old sales books I've read said to use AIDA when selling. I might have even read that here. Is that a good model to follow?
AIDA is used as an acronym, but much more common is AIDCA, which adds the word Conviction into the model.

It is a classic model in advertising. It has also been used many times as a learning model for selling, and for sales presentations.

The Dale Carnegie Sales Course (not the public speaking course) used AIDCA as a model for teaching sales.

I have felt for several years that, consistent with the Acronym, "agreement" is more strategically sound then "attention". In other words, establishing common ground early. Naturally, that usually gets "attention".

I don't think AIDCA works as a selling system per se, but it is an adequate learning model in my opinion.

Thomas, you might want to use AIDCA rather than AIDA in your online search. It should bear fruit. - by Gary Boye
Is that a good model to follow?
Food for thought Thomas:
  • Attention - If they are not paying attention then they are not listening.
  • Interest - Talk in terms of the other persons interests; their wants or needs.
  • Desire - Show them how your product/service is the solution of choice. Build desire.
  • Action - If they don't take action you have no sale. Help them take action.
These are the basics. These alone could be and probably have been the starting point for many "selling systems". - by Agent Smith
These are the basics. These alone could be and probably have been the starting point for many "selling systems".
What is the starting point? :cu - by Thomas
What is the starting point? :cu
The AIDA model is a good starting point or framework for a selling system. It makes sense to structure a selling system around a model of the typical buyer decision process.

If you look close enough you're likely to find AIDA lurking in the background of almost every selling system today.

Does this structure look familiar?

A - Attention... aka Approach
I - Interest... aka Interview
D - Desire... aka Presentation
A - Action... aka Commitment
*S - Satisfaction (Customer satisfaction leading to repeat and referral business.) - by Agent Smith
If you look close enough you're likely to find AIDA lurking in the background of almost every selling system today.
I believe that is true, although I have occasionally seen authors and trainers attempt to dispute it. - by Gary Boye
AIDA is for advertising copy not personal selling. I think. :hu
Personal Selling Example: Ticket Scalping
"Hey you!" - Attention
"Are you looking for tickets to the game?" - Interest
"I have two tickets in the fourth row for $100." - Desire
"Do you want them?" - Action - by AZBroker
Personal Selling Example: Ticket Scalping
"Hey you!" - Attention
"Are you looking for tickets to the game?" - Interest
"I have two tickets in the fourth row for $100." - Desire
"Do you want them?" - Action
I stand corrected. :hu;bg - by Marcus
Thomas you might give "AIUAPR" a try in your online search. ;) - by SalesGuy
Someone told me that AIDA mirrors the way people make their buying decisions, What goes on in their minds, so businesses subsequently used it to market and advertise their products. Using it to sell would seem to make pretty good sense. - by marky
A general model of the buyer decision process consists of the following steps:
  1. Want recognition;
  2. Search of information on products that could satisfy the needs of the buyer;
  3. Alternative selection;
  4. Decision-making on buying the product;
  5. Post-purchase behavior
- by BossMan
Someone told me that AIDA mirrors the way people make their buying decisions, What goes on in their minds, so businesses subsequently used it to market and advertise their products. Using it to sell would seem to make pretty good sense.
That is right.
The buying decision research was conducted in the late 1940s by the big thre