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Buying Motives: What are the different buying motives?

Are buying motives important to know when selling? What are the different buying motives? - by Marcus
Are buying motives important to know when selling?
Yes.
What are the different buying motives?
The four that come to mind are pride, profit, pain, and pleasure. - by BossMan
You've heard the old saying that people buy for their own reasons yes? How important do you think those reasons are because you're talking about the same thing. - by SalesCoach
We ask six different questions pertaining to motivation in the "Discovery or Disqualification" phase of the High Probability Selling process. I will not list those questions here because, taken out of the context of the process, they will not mean anything.

One of the significant things that happen, due to asking those questions, is that the prospects justify their own reasons for buying to themselves six different ways. Furthermore, we know the important issues to address. - by JacquesWerth
In my opinion, at the core level the motive behind a person's actions will be to either avoid pain or gain pleasure. - by Liberty
I've trashed all the systems that teach anything than ask simple questions to find out why someone wants something - if the answers are vague I may be able to help make them clear - but that's about it.

MitchM - by MitchM
I think it's important to know as much relavent information about the prospect's situation as you can discover. This includes understanding their true motives to action. - by Milton
I agree Miltion - my position isn't contrary to that - when what I offer is what someone says he or she wants then I find out why, expectations, motivation, etc. to determine if it's a fit or not.

MitchM - by MitchM
Two weeks ago I was hiking in the morning and I stopped to chat with a gal working out doors at the local college - she takes care of the grounds and was doing something with her weed wacker. "I see you're doing something with your weed wacker," I said and a conversation began.

Actually I wanted to keep walking because I have a habit that's taken over - so long and far to walk in such an amount of time - BUT I had to fight that habit internally to stop and chat because my business means casual contacts as well as cold calling, etc.

Though the conversation I mostly asked questions and we had an ordinary conersation BUT always remembering Zig Ziglers - "Sales is a conversation with a destination." Iwas able by listening and asking questions to steer the conversation into what I do and then she asked me questions - her mom with health issues was the focus. "Find out if your mom will talk with me," I asked giving her my business card - she was reluctant to give me her phone number so I didn't push it.

A couple days later she called telling me her mom wanted some information - I met her and gave her a brochure and another print out but again said, "Find out if your mom will talk with me - the brochure won't answer questions." Two days later she called me saying her mom and dad would talk with me."

I called and got them both on the phone and asked lots of questions, he in turn asked lots of questions, and through that they determined they wanted a six - eight month supply of products - I also introduced them to someone on the phone who could validate the products with her story.

I never pushed for a close - from the beginning it was an inquiry process of mutuality and what happened was we mutually closed in on the outcome - the purchase of $1,600 worth of products. Now it's up to us to do good follow-up which we've already begun.

That's a desctiption of how I work much of the time.

MitchM - by MitchM
I have now added "I see you're doing something with your weed wacker.." to my repertoire.

All kidding aside, Mitch....great story. - by Gary Boye
Hahahaha - LOL yea, it's a standard line of mine, Gary. It has so many applications.

The best to you always. - by MitchM
Are buying motives important to know when selling? What are the different buying motives?
Motives are drivers of behavior and rarely is a single motive in play.

There are "surface" motives such as increased profits, reduced costs, improved productivity, etc. These surface motives are very helpful for rationalizing a purchase decision. However it's the "deep" motives such as avoiding pain (Security: Increase profits so that I don't lose my income.) and/or gaining pleasure (Status: Increase profits so that I will be more respected.) that are the real drivers. - by SalesGuy
This is getting complicated. How will knowing buying motives help me? - by Marcus
Knowing your prospect's buying motives means you know what is most important to them. You're on the same page. This helps you because you can customize your presentation to fit the prospect. - by Jolly Roger
Can anyone provide an example of this being used? - by Marcus
Two people might purchase the same product for completely separate reasons. For instance, one person might purchase the Mercedes sedan for esteem reasons and another person might purchase the Mercedes sedan for safety reasons. Your presentation should be tailored to the buyer's individual reasons instead of using a standardized or canned presentation. - by Agent Smith
That's why you find out what peope want - they'll tell you what they want and why when you ask, for the most part. The biggest failure of the one doing the selling can be not asking simple and direct questions with no agenda other than finding out if what the buyer wants can be met or not.

Very simple - it's how I do business. - by MitchM
Don't know if anyone has read "SPIN Selling". Its research based and identifies motives / needs identification as being one of the keys to success.
We have several acronyms linked to customer buying motives, in the UK automotive market.
We reckon our customer's buying motives full into one, some or all of the following:
P erformance
R eliability
E conomy
C omfort
I mage
S afety & security
E njoyment

like people have already ready said you just have to find out which ones "float your customers boat" I say "just" I know its not quite that easy, but that's one of our initial goals when we meet customers. - by marky
Nice acronym Marky. Does that come from industry training or is your local dealership's training? - by Agent Smith
Agent Smith - It comes out of industry training, through some manufacturers that i've worked with. Some dealers work with it some don't. - by marky
Do those who don't use it have something different or better? - by Agent Smith
There seems to be more and more dealers now who are just content to sell on price alone - just to do the numbers and get $x per unit and the dealer gets some back end profit. Those that can't compete in that market have to use something like PRECISE and sell some additional stuff to customers to get them to buy from them. What's it like in your market? - by marky
Selling on Price alone can be tough. I buy and sell pre-owned homes for a living so my market isn't the same but I get my share of price shoppers. - by Agent Smith
We don't waste time with people who will not pay our price.

Most people do ask about price and most salespeople assume that the question is indicative of a price buyer.

Our research shows that only 16 percent of prospects buy primarily on price.

However, a far higher percentage will attempt to get the lowest price from the vendor that they prefer to deal with.

If you have the prospect's trust and respect, and they feel certain of getting their money's worth, most people will pay your price - if it is not exorbitant. If you are afraid of losing an occasional sale on price, that desperation can become very expensive to you. - by JacquesWerth
Helping customers identify and clarify what is really important helps them and you. - by AZBroker
I truly believe, and have experienced firsthand, that understanding the buying motive of the individual decision-maker is about 75% of the sale. You might be selling exactly what the person needs, but if you don't touch on their motivation to say Yes, they want to buy it, then no sale.

Marcus, in all seriousness, you should research the Dale Carnegie Sales Training methods. I took an 8-week class on this and it absolutely turned my entire business around. I can't express how much of it was based on identifying and developing the buying motive. I was AMAZED to find how different they are than what common sense would imply. - by Coda1108
How do define "... the "buying motive of the individual decison-maker?"

How do you identiy and develop the buying motive?

If that is 75% of the sale, what is the other 25%? - by JacquesWerth
1. With proper questioning techniques. Build a rapport and get to know the person. For example, I once met with a prospect who talked about how much he loved to spend time at his house in the mountains... but he was so busy, he hardly got enough time. His buying motive was the value of his time. Which leads to the 2nd part of the answer...
2. Once I knew what his motivation was (Have more time to spend in his mountain house), I led him to see the value of how much time he would save personally by using our service. That's most of the other 25%. Having the prospect understand the value of what you're selling to him or her. But they have to see it for themselves, you can't just tell them. - by Coda1108
In my opinion helping people get what they want is a core principle of selling. - by AZBroker
1. With proper questioning techniques. Build a rapport and get to know the person. For example, I once met with a prospect who talked about how much he loved to spend time at his house in the mountains... but he was so busy, he hardly got enough time. His buying motive was the value of his time. Which leads to the 2nd part of the answer...
2. Once I knew what his motivation was (Have more time to spend in his mountain house), I led him to see the value of how much time he would save personally by using our service. That's most of the other 25%. Having the prospect understand the value of what you're selling to him or her. But they have to see it for themselves, you can't just tell them.
That's describes what old time salespeople call "looking for the hook." - by JacquesWerth
Yeah, I've heard the term "the hook" before. There's a bunch more to how the DC method gets there, just not that appropriate to go into here. The difference is primarily HOW you match the particular value of what your selling to the particular motivation.

As AZB states so well, getting people what they want is a core principle of selling, so naturally it shows up in different forms, whether it's "The Hook", DC, Spin Selling or any of the other ways.

I think all the "methods" are fine for understanding a WAY to get from point A to point B, but the bottom line is that one must be comfortable in their rapport and presentation. I'd rather go out of the "lines" of any sales "system" to have a more sincere long-term relationship. - by Coda1108
If you want to sell "people what they want," why not learn how to find and make appointments with people who already want the benefits of your products and services?

If you want a "sincere long-term relationship," why not learn how to develop deep emotional relationships of mutual trust and respect - immediately? - by JacquesWerth
Great day all,

Great input from all.

My thought is: if you can show and tell how your service/product can save a client money, save the client time and or help the client make more money... and if the client likes you as a person, theoretically the client will purchase that service/product from you.:thu ;sm ;co ;bg - by job ready strategist
My thought is: if you can show and tell how your service/product can save a client money, save the client time and or help the client make more money... and if the client likes you as a person, theoretically the client will purchase that service/product from you.:thu ;sm ;co ;bg
That would seem to be logical.
However, first you need to contact the client and get an appointment.

If you visit with someone who doesn't already know that they have a problem that your type of product can solve, than you will need to "... show and tell how your service/product can save a client money, save the client time and or help the client make more money."

However, if the type of product or service you want to sell is not a top priority for the client at this time, it is not likely that they will get busy with it. That is simply because most people have other more pressing things to work on.

As an example, I once talked with the CEO of a very large food manufacturer. I told her one of my companies could save her company at least $60,000 a year on employee benefits. She said that she was satisfied with her current supplier and would not spend the time on such a small project.

Only 3 % of people feel that it is important to buy from people they like. Seventy-two percent of people want to buy from people they trust and respect. - by JacquesWerth
Great day JacquesWerth,

I like what you are saying.

First, of course you have to have an appointment with a client.

Yes, it would be great if the client is aware that he/she wants what you have in a product/service. We know that is not always the case. One function of marketing/advertising is to present or make you aware of a product/service and in so doing changes your mind and hence your wallet.

To me, if I like you, trust and respect are part and parcel of the total package.

Thank you for sharing your great knowledge. I appreciate it.

michaelc.:thu - by job ready strategist
I'd like to add, respectfully, that "how we can save your company money" can be a bit of a trap. I fell into it pretty easily myself, as what my company sells does actually save money and effort over time.

However, when you get into this, there are two risks:
First, if you set it up to be about saving money, the customer has every reason to balk about the price. After all, if you're selling something to save money, they'd save even MORE money if you lower your price. If you sell value, then you're prepared to talk about the MANY ways your prospect will benefit, not just cost savings.

Second, and this is the one that baffled me at first... Saving money might not be the motivator for that particular buyer. Heck, if you get to know your customer and find out that his or her college roommate can produce 100 widgets an hour in his company, and this turns out to be a hot spot... a promise that he or she could produce 120 widgets an hour might be what makes the sale... AND you did it without sacrificing price.

Just my two cents... All the views above are obviously very valid... I just wanted to add the bit about Value, and being able to match the proper Value with the appropriate motivator (or "hook"). - by Coda1108
Saving money might not be the motivator for that particular buyer.
Unless you know otherwise, saving money is a "probable" interest or problem and shouldn't be treated as a "specific" interest or problem. - by BossMan
I realize this isn't a common point of view, but I've learned it the hard way and believe in it. By assuming cost savings is a probable issue, then you're setting a buyer up to use price as a negotiable factor. If instead, you focus on the value of what you're selling, then the buyer is more likely to embrace your product or service for its value.

Of course, one should ALWAYS be ready for the "Can't we do better on the price" objection, but I see no reason to give the buyer that open door right from the start by assuming cost savings is a probable motivator.

I know this goes against how we think, which is driven by human nature. That's because most of us think as if we were the buyer, and what buyer doesn't want to save money. However, as salespeople, if we focus on the value of what we're selling, we immediately validate that value, as opposed to giving in on price, which devalues what we're selling.

In fact, when a prospect balks about price, instead of just simply lowering the price for what I'm selling, I will change the type of service he or she is looking at to meet a lower price. This maintains the value of what we do. Of course, this is the last course of action, because at least half the time, when price becomes an "objection" and I focus on the value they're getting for that price, the objection is overcome without having to lower the price.

I guarantee any experience salesperson will feel uncomfortable with this at first. But everyone I know who sells value instead of lowers price agrees it's great direction. Additionally, you build respect with your client and word of mouth does wonders.

On a related note, NYC Mayor Michael Bloomburg was first famous for creating and running Bloomburg Financial to the multi-national powerhouse status it is now. His philosophy on pricing is fairly well-known. He believes if a product or service is NOT selling well.... Raise the price!!!! This will increase its value in the eyes of potential buyers. - by Coda1108
The Price vs. Value issue needs to be handled before you spend any time with a prospect. We deal with it on the phone, right after we set the appointment - like this.

"The tuition for the ten salespeople your want to train will be between $15,000 and $25,000. Are prepared to pay within that range for sales training?"

If the prospect does not say "Yes," we cancel the appointment. - by JacquesWerth
The Price vs. Value issue needs to be handled before you spend any time with a prospect. We deal with it on the phone, right after we set the appointment - like this.

"The tuition for the ten salespeople your want to train will be between $15,000 and $25,000. Are prepared to pay within that range for sales training?"

If the prospect does not say "Yes," we cancel the appointment.
The issue with this is I would automatically say no, because you're asking me if I want to spend 15 to 25k of my company's money. If, instead, I was first convinced that the value of your sales training would result in my company earning at least that because of the increased production of my salespeople, THEN I might be inclined to say yes.

So you would have lost my sale on the telephone, simply because you made it about price, not about value. - by Coda1108
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