Home > Resistance > Any advice for when people say they need to think about it?

Any advice for when people say they need to think about it?

I work for an estate agency in Cyprus selling houses for holiday homes or investments but recently seem to be getting a lot of people who need to "think about it".Surely if they were not seriously interested in buying they would not be willing to actually view properties when they could be on the beach? Any tips?? - by Lea25
You need to do a bit of simple testing and play acting:

Prepare a simple A4 questionaire with 10 questions on it, and maybe 9 photos of houses on it [tick the house/price you like photos] and give them some story about "How much you want to work with them", in order to do so you need to know their needs, wants, budget, and hopes. Leave space for them to add loads of information on it and ask them to bring it back to you later in the day or post it back to you. In effect your saying - without saying it, prove to me you really are interested, you see 8 out of 10 won't bother - SO THEY REJECTED THEMSELVES.

I call this the go for a coffee break and come back later screening method, others might have another name for it. - by Incidentally
This post of mine is to assist the OP. She is being plagued by "Let me think about it clients", meaning clients wasting her time. Using a questionaire is a simple means for her to let clients CHANGE THEIR MINDS, by leaving the building [with the questionaire to complete] and deciding whether THEY OUGHT TO GO BACK or not.

Take it from me if they've seen a property they like - barbed wire and machine guns won't keep them away. If clients have seen the property then telling the sales person to let them think about it - indicates they are not sold on it and you [the sales person] need to DISMISS THEM. This is a broad observation, they might have said "We like the property but can something be done about XYZ, so this is not the normal run-of-the-mill let-me-think about it situation.

Shinningstar is correct, you do have a number of clients who want to be loved, admired and respected, so they choose and use these common goodbye phrases to depart with dignity. - by Incidentally
Take it from me if they've seen a property they like - barbed wire and machine guns won't keep them away.
This is true... the day we first saw this house, and knew others would be looking too, we didn't need to think about it. We told the realtor to make an offer before we pulled away because it was our dream home and we didn't want to lose it. Even after doing that, I suffered because I wondered if we should have just said we'd pay the asking price and not let someone else come along and do that and steal it. ;bg It worked out okay, though. Whew! - by destiny
In response to the original question...

I was taught to agree, "I understand you want to think about this. I would too. It's definitely a big decision."

Then ask the question, "Does a week to think about it sound good to you?" Use any appropriate length of time. This lets your customer know you are really giving them the opportunity to do what they want; think about it. And by giving the thinking process a finite time, you prevent it from becoming an end to your sales process and it becomes more of a step along the way.

Then recap with your customer the main factors that will influence the sale; the house and how it fits their needs and wants, the way they were treated by you, the professionalism of the company, and finally the financial aspects of the deal.

"So, how do you feel about the house as it pertains to what you are looking for?"
"Have I been helpful so far?"
"Is there any more information I could help you with?"
"What do you think about the overall price compared to your opinion of the house?"
"Do you think that financing or buying this property fits into the budget you have set for yourself?"

A lot of times, their 'think about it' objection is a stall that is masking a real objection. Using that process will most likely uncover what is bugging them. - by jamesrobertstclair
I work for an estate agency in Cyprus selling houses for holiday homes or investments but recently seem to be getting a lot of people who need to "think about it".Surely if they were not seriously interested in buying they would not be willing to actually view properties when they could be on the beach? Any tips??
If a prospective buyer says he/she needs to "think about it" that does not mean he/she is not seriously interested. Personally, I would probe deeper into what prompted the "think about it" response. - by Jeff Blackwell
If a prospective buyer says he/she needs to "think about it" that does not mean he/she is not seriously interested. Personally, I would probe deeper into what prompted the "think about it" response.
I have found that "I'll think about it" means there is a disconnect between: the prospect's verbal language; body language, and what these catalysts generated as the real communication; and or the reps interpretation of all three factors.

Probing deeper into what was in fact communicated is an intuitive process seasoned sales reps know very well. In effect, more experience is needed here or as is too often the case with all of us, they were not qualified buyers in the first place. - by John Voris
In my opinion...and I came to this opinion from selling big ticket items for a long time...why not allow them the opportunity to think about it?

I completely understand why you would want to think about it. We are talking about a lot of money. When can I get back with you on your decision? - by MPrince
It isn't how you answer the reply "I have to think about it" that is important...it is more important to understand why you did not ask better questions during 'qualifying' the prospect, to determine if you really have someone 'willing and able to buy' that will make the necessary commitments to move forward. - by Paulette Halpern
It isn't how you answer the reply "I have to think about it" that is important...it is more important to understand why you did not ask better questions during 'qualifying' the prospect, to determine if you really have someone 'willing and able to buy' that will make the necessary commitments to move forward.
What if you asked GREAT questions and they STILL wanted to think about it before making a commitment? Is that their right? Or not? If it IS their right, is it something you want to take away from them?

Is there anything inherently wrong with a corridor existing between Able and Willing? If so, please tell us what you think it is.

Or are the answers to the above questions something you want to think about? - by Gary A Boye
What if you asked GREAT questions and they STILL wanted to think about it before making a commitment? Is that their right? Or not? If it IS their right, is it something you want to take away from them?

Is there anything inherently wrong with a corridor existing between Able and Willing? If so, please tell us what you think it is.

Or are the answers to the above questions something you want to think about?

You may believe that the questions you asked were 'great' but they still did not accomplish getting a commitment. Learning how to set up the appointment with the 'close' planned as the outcome and getting the prospect to agree, that at the end of the meeting he will give you a decision is key. If the perameters are set correctly you will get more decisions and less stalls that come to you as "I have to think it over, for a few days'....too may times, the next part of the process is that the salesperson is following up to 'get the decision' yet all he has is 'free unlimited access to the prospects voice mail'. - by Paulette Halpern
I agree 100% with Paulette. I might add that a good up front contract will prevent the TIO from happening. I.E. "Mr. Prospect I understand you are looking for ______(product or service), I am not sure at this point whether there is a good fit for both of us. However, if at the end of our meeting, you are uncertain about anything will you bring that attention before we conclude the meeting? (expect a yes) Great, one last thing at the end of our meeting can I expect a yes or no? Please keep in mind that no is my second favorite answer, maybe or I want to think it over really won't help you or me wouldn't you agree. You can say no and we can still be friends OK? - by triadtraining
I agree 100% with Paulette. I might add that a good up front contract will prevent the TIO from happening. I.E. "Mr. Prospect I understand you are looking for ______(product or service), I am not sure at this point whether there is a good fit for both of us. However, if at the end of our meeting, you are uncertain about anything will you bring that attention before we conclude the meeting? (expect a yes) Great, one last thing at the end of our meeting can I expect a yes or no? Please keep in mind that no is my second favorite answer, maybe or I want to think it over really won't help you or me wouldn't you agree. You can say no and we can still be friends OK?
I believe that is horrible advice. You are SELLING..remember. It's not about you. Selling is not about setting the ground rules for a prospect's or customer's behaviour. Neither is it about instructing that person what he/she needs to do for the privilege of being your friend. If we eliminated all the people who think things over from our lives, we would either live on an island--or be surrounded by stuffed dolls.

The best "up front contract" consists of mutual trust and respect. An experienced salesperson can identify such conditions often with very few words being spoken. It is a bilateral contact if you need to use that word. - by Gary A Boye
Gary,

I agree and disagree with you. Selling is a process, it starts with bonding and rapport and bonding and rapport must be present throughout the process. One of the strongest bonding and rapport (trustbuilding) tools is to make your prospect aware first, that no is OK. Secondly, to inform the prospect of how the process works (isn't that more refreshing than the dog and pony show most "salespeople" deliver and waste the prospect's time.
Selling is all about trust. Most prospects don't trust sales people. The more you act like, talk like, walk like and dillydallie around, the more your prospect's have a reason to mistrust you.

Disarming honesty is not only refreshing to the prospect, but it set's you ahead of your competition as a professional and consultative salesperson. - by triadtraining
Gary,

I agree and disagree with you. Selling is a process, it starts with bonding and rapport and bonding and rapport must be present throughout the process. One of the strongest bonding and rapport (trustbuilding) tools is to make your prospect aware first, that no is OK. Secondly, to inform the prospect of how the process works (isn't that more refreshing than the dog and pony show most "salespeople" deliver and waste the prospect's time.
Selling is all about trust. Most prospects don't trust sales people. The more you act like, talk like, walk like and dillydallie around, the more your prospect's have a reason to mistrust you.

Disarming honesty is not only refreshing to the prospect, but it set's you ahead of your competition as a professional and consultative salesperson.
OK.. fair enough..but let's explore it further.

First of all, rapport is NOT trustbuilding. You could have two sociopath professional con artists telling lies to one another with mega-rapport.

If you want to substitute Conditions of Mutual Trust and Respect for the stale word "rapport", then we can get to the same page.

Second, in spite of what most sales trainers say, selling is not a process--it is an ENGAGEMENT.

I agree wholeheartedly with the message that NO IS OK, as did the late David Sandler, and his recent pastiche, Jim Camp (Start With NO). However, the examples that you gave on how to deliver that message are what I described as horrible (and still do describe that way).

Third, we DON"T describe "how the process works." If we are good--really good--we tell them how WE work. Examples: "Let me tell you how I work with clients." or "Let me tell you what I believe." (Very powerful--those seven words.)

Fourth, we don't "disarm" people with our honesty. They disarm themselves. That is the power of engagement over control. Your suggestions are of the latter.

Fifth, consultative selling is another topic. - by Gary A Boye
Gary...as usual your wisdom is astounding. i agree totally and especially these quotes.

Second, in spite of what most sales trainers say, selling is not a process--it is an ENGAGEMENT
Selling is like a beautiful dance, you gently leading with the client following.

Fourth, we don't "disarm" people with our honesty. They disarm themselves. That is the power of engagement over control. Your suggestions are of the latter.
I agree totally...if we are open/honest there is no reason for the prospect/client to be armed. They know it and feel it. Mutual trust evolves.

Great post Gary! - by MPrince
Gary,
Thanks for making my point. Please do not take things so literally. It's not so much what you say, but how you say it. I am being very to the point in my language, however, the delivery has to be soft. I am passing along the message, not how to deliver it. I am a Sandler fan and have been to over 400 hours of President's club meetings. Call the sales cycle what you want, but by any other name (engagement, experience, or whatever) and it is still a process. Sandler is the only ISO certified training program there is. Most sales people don't subscribe to it, because it is so counter intuitive. It is also very expensive. If you are selling balloons no need to invest in this way of selling. If you have a product or service that is worth the price and it is a high ticket item, then you might want to sign up. - by triadtraining
Sandler is the only ISO certified training program there is. Most sales people don't subscribe to it, because it is so counter intuitive.
Most sales people don't subscribe to it because they never heard of it.

This is not a debate, and the playful "thanks for making my point" doesn't cut it. The site here is about helping less experienced people learn to make a living in sales and making their lives, and their family's lives, better. People here WILL take your examples LITERALLY, unless they are experienced to see the folly in them. Don't argue about it. Just post with a sense of resposibility and your advice will be welcome here. - by Gary A Boye
Gary,

You are correct, my apologies to you. I am glad you pointed that out to me. I was thinking that many here were not new to the profession. Thanks again for your candor and cut to the heart criticism. I appreciate your diplomatic responses.

Best of luck to you. - by triadtraining
Gary,

You are correct, my apologies to you. I am glad you pointed that out to me. I was thinking that many here were not new to the profession. Thanks again for your candor and cut to the heart criticism. I appreciate your diplomatic responses.

Best of luck to you.
Thanks. And thanks for the class you bring to our community. - by Gary A Boye
I'm not experienced in this type of sales, but I'm curious what the usual outcome is of such a reaction. For example, if a potential clients says they need time to think about it, does this ordinarily result in no sale? Or does it run the gamut? Just curious. - by salesandsales
I'm not experienced in this type of sales, but I'm curious what the usual outcome is of such a reaction. For example, if a potential clients says they need time to think about it, does this ordinarily result in no sale? Or does it run the gamut? Just curious.
Good question.

I don't know the "statistics", whew..thank God. But I believe the outcome is somewhat determined by how the salesperson responds and how the prospect relates to THE EXPERIENCE of that response.

My own ratio of conversions under those circumstances has been very high. I have a tendency to take a client/prospect at his/her word. To do otherwise would demonstrate lack of trust, and there is much truth to the saying that people who don't trust others can't be trusted themselves. With that in mind, things mostly play out well.

Think about it. - by Gary A Boye
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