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Awkward Cold Call

I recieved a call yesterday. The person calling had their ID blocked--this always irritates me. When I picked up, the person on the other end just gave his name. I had no idea whoe he wasa or what he wanted. As it turned out, he was looking for a joint venture partner. I would have appreciated that information when he introduced himself. The first 10 minutes were really awkward because of the way it started out.He had no idea what the customer (me) would think of a blocked call and someone just giving me their name.
We all can learn a lesson from this...

Susan - by susana
We all can learn a lesson from this...
First impressions set the tone for the rest of the call. - by Marcus
I recieved a call yesterday. The person calling had their ID blocked--this always irritates me. When I picked up, the person on the other end just gave his name. I had no idea who he was or what he wanted.
Was that a gimmick to get you to ask who he was and why he was calling? - by Thomas
Was that a gimmick to get you to ask who he was and why he was calling?
If it was...it didn't work. - by susana
If it was...it didn't work.
Whatever he called about must have been a hum-dinger to get past that and keep you on the phone for the awkward 10 minutes. - by Thomas
Whatever he called about must have been a hum-dinger to get past that and keep you on the phone for the awkward 10 minutes.
It took a while for him to get around to it. I kept saying, 'How would I be of help to you?' He wanted access to my Rolodex from my jet selling days. That was a no. However, I did get him to sign up on the mailing list for my selling to millionaire's product. ;bg

Susan - by susana
He wanted access to my Rolodex from my jet selling days.
I'm sure he did. ;bg

However, I did get him to sign up on the mailing list for my selling to millionaire's product.
Kudos Susan. :thu - by Calvin
When I call a business owner asking if he/she is considering diversification what I say never varies - I introduce myself, say what I'm offering as far as financial diversification and why [the benefits of it] and ask if the person wants to know more. That's it. It takes a minute and it's direct and to the point which is what I respect when I get called. If I don't respect the caller I don't want to know more. If I respect the caller it's because the caller got right to the point. If I want to know more it's not because of the caller but because I was already thinking about what the caller called about - that's it.

Very simple.

MitchM - by MitchM
I think I wass really put off because he blocked his caller ID. That tells me that he thinks I ouldn't want to talk to him if I knkew who it was. That doesn't display a lot of confidence.

Susan - by susana
I think I wass really put off because he blocked his caller ID. That tells me that he thinks I ouldn't want to talk to him if I knkew who it was. That doesn't display a lot of confidence.

Susan
What if all outbound calls from that facility were blocked? - by WobblyBox
What if all outbound calls from that facility were blocked?
That's certainly possible. Is that a common practice in most small businesses?

Susan - by susana
Is that a common practice in most small businesses?
I doubt that. - by WobblyBox
I recieved a call yesterday. The person calling had their ID blocked--this always irritates me. When I picked up, the person on the other end just gave his name. I had no idea whoe he wasa or what he wanted. As it turned out, he was looking for a joint venture partner. I would have appreciated that information when he introduced himself. The first 10 minutes were really awkward because of the way it started out.He had no idea what the customer (me) would think of a blocked call and someone just giving me their name.
We all can learn a lesson from this...

Susan
Trust is one of the number one assets a sales person can have. Blocking your number and withholding your name are not good starting points! - by Ed McLean
Be direct and to the point to establish immediate trust in a relationship - if the other person doesn't get you can't make that person get it. In a minute I want the other person to know why I've called and if that person wants me to continue or not - I feel that way about that person too.

Very simple.
MitchM - by MitchM
I guess I don't see the relationship between a caller ID not showing and a call from a sales person wanting to sell something.

I'm more impressed with the skill set of the person making the phone call myself.

I'm a big believer in what's referred to as "permission based marketing"..... so if the person who's calling has been properly trained to use the phone I'll want to listen to what they have to say.

I'm also not one who subscribes to the do not call list thing either. It's just a part of my sales mentality I guess.

Chuck - by Sales Pro 1000
I recieved a call yesterday. The person calling had their ID blocked--this always irritates me. When I picked up, the person on the other end just gave his name. I had no idea whoe he wasa or what he wanted. As it turned out, he was looking for a joint venture partner. I would have appreciated that information when he introduced himself. The first 10 minutes were really awkward because of the way it started out.He had no idea what the customer (me) would think of a blocked call and someone just giving me their name.
We all can learn a lesson from this...

Susan
"The person calling had their ID blocked..." Often done by telemarketing firms; not a tactic I like. - by Wonderboy
Wonderboy,

My add'l two cents worth on this subject.

Technology has advanced the how and why we as humans justify the use of our time and our space.

I guess that I don't see why caller ID needs to have a negative effect. The only reason most people use it is just because they can.

For about $200 I took a one day cold calling class held by the local Dale Carnigie licensee. We learned to deal with this and many other obstacles in the field of sales.

Chuck - by Sales Pro 1000
Wonderboy,

My add'l two cents worth on this subject.

Technology has advanced the how and why we as humans justify the use of our time and our space.

I guess that I don't see why caller ID needs to have a negative effect. The only reason most people use it is just because they can.

For about $200 I took a one day cold calling class held by the local Dale Carnigie licensee. We learned to deal with this and many other obstacles in the field of sales.

Chuck
I think we always like to know who we're dealing with in the shortest time possible - speaking for myself, I regard a phone call as an invasion of my privacy so I'd like to know who's on the other end.

Thanx Sales Pro. - by Wonderboy
Wonderboy, thanks for the explanation.

I've not thought of a business telephone call as an invasion of privacy I guess. To me it's much the same as the front door of the business. During business hours it's open. Business, to my mind, is basically communication between two or more human beings, and that communication can be carried by a variety of methods.

Chuck - by Sales Pro 1000
I am new to sales, although not new to my industry of Commercial Printing, I would like to know how you are supposed to communicate with potential customers if the clients screen calls.
Is'nt business 1 on 1 communication between 2 people. - by SBritton
I've not thought of a business telephone call as an invasion of privacy I guess. To me it's much the same as the front door of the business. During business hours it's open.

Chuck
The problem is the prospect doesn't see it that way. The analogy is wrong.

If I walk through the front door of your office, I'm seeking information. I'm inviting you to talk to me. If you call me without an invitation, it's an unwelcome invasion into my space. If you walk into my office uninvited to sell me something, I have every right to have my receptionist politely decline your request to see me. It's my office, not yours. You've invited yourself into my space. The same goes if you call me. You've invited yourself in--which doesn't mean you're welcome.

The biggest problem with cold calling is that most people calling simply waste the prospect's time. Consequently, prospects have been taught that salespeople are time wasters and to avoid them. Prospects don't have their calls screened or refuse to return unsolicited voice messages to intentionally be rude, they do it because they've been taught that answering the calls or returning the call wastes a lot of their time. Unfortunately, that means even the salespeople who call who have learned how to bring real value to the conversation suffer. - by pmccord
If I get unwanted email, it's called SPAM.

If I get unwanted phone solicitations, I consider it the same as SPAM.

The person who called me was contacting me about a possible joint venture. As this is a business opportunity, and we both belong to the same JV club, there was no reason to block his number.

Also, had he started the call with an introduction and told me he was a part of the JV group, it would have created a much better impression.

I contact people all the time about JV's. I usually send a letter with a note that I will follow up with a phone call. That way, they're expecting my call.

Susan - by susana
I think maybe we're getting somewhere with this thread. The reason I'm massaging it is that the circumstances you've described here are major obstacles in the quest to selling goods and services to strangers.

Knowing how to deal with these issues can make a big difference in one's paycheck. That difference could be between being a clerk at a big box store for $7 and hour or making $100K a year is a real fine line.

The thread originally started out being the subject of caller ID not being visible.

My position is that if the caller had been schooled in the fine art of cold calling on the telephone the blocked caller ID could have been a non-issue.

The spread between what can be considered spam and not spam is also a very fine line and those of us in the selling profession need to understand how this works.

Before we can apply our selling skills we need to work through this barrier by honing our skills.

Chuck - by Sales Pro 1000
My position is that if the caller had been schooled in the fine art of cold calling on the telephone the blocked caller ID could have been a non-issue.


I've never received any training on telephone cold calling. That's why I send letters and tell the prospect that I'll be calling. Gives them some advance notice.

Susan


- by susana
You can't lose what you don't have.

Who among us has such a short prospecting list that it matters whether any given prospect answers their phone or not? A sufficient percentage will answer.

Just make the calls, handle those that answer expertly, and you will always have an abundance of High Probability appointments. - by JacquesWerth
Be direct and to the point to establish immediate trust in a relationship - if the other person doesn't get you can't make that person get it. In a minute I want the other person to know why I've called and if that person wants me to continue or not - I feel that way about that person too.

Very simple.
MitchM
Mitch,

I do a lot of cold calling to drum up new potential business partners, mostly real estate people so far, and I go back and forth from using a "quick script" (letting them know why I am calling and what I can do for them) and taking a few moments at the beginning of the call to strike up some chit chat and get them comfortable with me. Do you really think people value the "quick script" more?

Thanks,
Lisa - by lisamom
Yes. I think people value a quick offer you have to make and if it's a YES you follow with whatever you do to discuss the opportunity. There are a lot of models around as to what to do next - I have my favorites - but you're looking for someone you can trust who is honest and answers questions. You look for commitment toward the next step.

At the same time that person if trustworthy, honest etc. will be looking for the same things in you - there's a mutuality involved.

A direct relationship that is clear and non manipulative is the best getting started with a cold market prospect.

The best of success to you.

MitchM - by MitchM
Mitch,

I do a lot of cold calling to drum up new potential business partners, mostly real estate people so far, and I go back and forth from using a "quick script" (letting them know why I am calling and what I can do for them) and taking a few moments at the beginning of the call to strike up some chit chat and get them comfortable with me. Do you really think people value the "quick script" more?

Thanks,
Lisa

Hi Lisa,

I think, and its my opinion, that if you are making a "cold call" or even a "prospecting call", courtesy should reign. That courtesy should necessarily include who's calling and why I'm asking for you to indulge me your precious time. "Is this a bad time" might be a good chit chat question before asking them for their opinion on your offering.

If you call me with an offering, I want to know what it is... right off... I'm not into telling you how the kids have painted murals on their bedroom walls... the hallway...

I know this isn't your question... but knowledge is power... give me knowledge with your opening statement.

Much Aloha.... shds; ;bg - by rattus58
Thanks for the feedback, every little bit helps! - by lisamom
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