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How do you build trust?

What can someone like me do to build trust with prospects? My work is calling on people who are selling their homes by themselves and getting them to list their home for sale with our company or meeting with people who call in and want to look at the homes we have listed. - by Thomas
Trust comes with time, but you can help it along greatly by establishing rapport. One of the best ways I know of that is by reflection, or mirroring. Mirroring is simply behaving the same way they do, but not in an obvious manner. If they are loud, speak loud, if they pause alot when they speak, you do too. Set your speech pattern to match thiers, expressions too. If they are stadning and put thier hands in thier pockets, you do it do some how. When you firt try it, you'll feel like an idiot, so do it to someone you know, when your comfortable with it, you'll find yourself doing it without even thinking about it.

People like people who are like them, if you are like them, they will like you. Then you have 80% of your trust building done.

Hope this helps,

TM - by TommyMac5
Establish credibility with testimonials from satisfied customers. If the prospect knows these customers that will be even better. - by Marcus
When I'm working with a prospect I look for common ground or points that we both agree on. I feel that doing this helps bring me to their side of the table and reduces the "Us vs. Them" mindset. - by Jolly Roger
So far, I've been dealing locally only with people I know. They already trust me so I don't have the problem of building trust.....yet. As I continue to grow my business, I'll have to deal with that so will keep an eye on this thread. - by ozzie
Thomas

I am not in the real estate business so perhaps there are things unique to it I am not aware of. Have you thought of asking the most successful agent in your company or your town to let you buy them lunch and pick their brain?

You meet people in their homes. Look for clues to help establish the common ground Jolly Roger mentioned. As you walk up, are there kid's toys or bikes? Does the yard show a love of gardening? When you first step inside are there family pictures or hobby photos?

These clues will help you if you will see them and talk about those things as opposed to immediately beginning your sales effort. Jolly Roger was right when he talked about the "us vs. them". What they need to see is you are like them. Relate the clues you see to another successful listing or sale customer. This gives your prospect the "he can do the same for me" feeling.

Best of luck in your selling efforts. - by Masteri5
Thomas as much as possible take advantage of the trust that comes with referrals and introductions. ;wi - by AZBroker
I know one good way to establish trust is to show the other person that you are listening and that you understand them. - by SpeedRacer
I know one good way to establish trust is to show the other person that you are listening and that you understand them.
I agree. When I first started selling I talked too much. Now I know that it's very important to listen carefully to what the prospect has to say. - by ozzie
ozzie

Very old sayings in sales...You have 2 ears and 1 mouth, use them in that proportion.

Samson slew 10,000 Philistines with the jawbone of an *** and that many deals are killed every day with the same weapon.


Best of luck in your selling efforts. - by Masteri5
ha ha ha! Those are both really good. Thanks for sharing them and thank you for the good luck.....I sure need it. I'm also working very hard but good luck would certainly help. - by ozzie
If you belong to professional organizations you could display your affiliations. For example, you could put it on your business card, a plaque behind your desk, on your letter head. The same for any credentials or designations. - by Mikey
Super ideas. Thank you everyone. ;tks - by Thomas
TRUST:

I take it for granted that your trustworthy, so act trustworthy, speak in a trustworthy clear concise manner, and switch it, act as if there not trustworthy and its up to them, not you, to convince you that they are worthy of your trust. - by Incidentally
TRUST:
I take it for granted that your trustworthy, so act trustworthy, speak in a trustworthy clear concise manner, and switch it, act as if there not trustworthy and its up to them, not you, to convince you that they are worthy of your trust.
That sounds like the old "Reverse Selling" scheme, which depends on how good an actor you are. - by JacquesWerth
Trust comes with time, but you can help it along greatly by establishing rapport. One of the best ways I know of that is by reflection, or mirroring. Mirroring is simply behaving the same way they do, but not in an obvious manner. If they are loud, speak loud, if they pause alot when they speak, you do too. Set your speech pattern to match thiers, expressions too. If they are stadning and put thier hands in thier pockets, you do it do some how. When you firt try it, you'll feel like an idiot, so do it to someone you know, when your comfortable with it, you'll find yourself doing it without even thinking about it.

People like people who are like them, if you are like them, they will like you. Then you have 80% of your trust building done.
TM
Whether of not people like you has very little to do with whether they trust you.

The best book I know of on the topic of Trust is "Power vs. Force" by Dr. David Hawkins. If you read it, you will understand why those types of manipulative techniques greatly hinder the development of trust with most prospects. - by JacquesWerth
TRUST:

The Chinese say a man has the face he deserves by the time he's 40. I say a mans eyes, voice, speech pattern, words, clothes, shoes, shirt, tie, the colour and make of his suit, shirt and shoes, the way he combs his hair, the condition of his teeth, all matter and collectively they convey a good idea to an observer of "who he his", "what he does" and what he has done in the past. I'll put it this way if a man books into a good hotel claiming to be John Henry Smithford 2nd, the heir to the Smithford Trust you know if he his, or not. Even though you have never heard of him, or the Smithford Trust. You see your instincts never stop working, so listen to your instincts.

I may post a picture of myself on here, so you can all rate me, I dress very conventional, you see your dress can improve or hamper your sales effort. Even today in England you cannot go out selling wearing Jeans and a T shirt. Are you allowed to post pictures? - by Incidentally
Are you allowed to post pictures?
Hello Incidentally. :)

If you would like me to upload an image to your post feel free to send me a link to the image via PM and I'll take care of that for you.

Cheers! - by Jeff Blackwell
Well, I'll be darned!

You really can tell a book by its cover. - by JacquesWerth
Well, I'll be darned!

You really can tell a book by its cover.
You're right! It's very important to dig a person's personality before giving your complete trust. Don't based on physical appearance of a person so that you'll never regret. - by shinningstar
You can develop a deep Relationships of Mutual Trust and Respect with about 90% of the people you meet within hour. However, it requires the ability and skill to develop emotional intimacy. Most people crave emotional intimacy and most salespeople fear it.

Most rapport building techniques that salespeople utilize such as commonality, flattery and approval are insincere ways to get prospects to like them. Such attempts at mental manipulation inhibit a trusting relationship. Furthermore, anyone who has dealt with very many salespeople knows exactly what you are doing, and why. NLP techniques such as mirroring and matching are seldom effective for the same reasons.

Whether or not a prospect likes you has very little to do with whether they will do business with you. Trust and Respect are the two most important buying decision factors. - by JacquesWerth
"Whether or not a prospect likes you has very little to do with whether they will do business with you. Trust and Respect are the two most important buying decision factors. "

It's been my experience that if I trust and respect someone then I will also like them very well. I may not like a few of their mannerisms but I will like them overall as a person. - by ozzie
How do you develop trust?

Simple. By creating meaningful encounters with prospects/clients.

How do you do that?

Simple. Take yourself and your own agenda out of the equation. Don't "pitch". Don't "overcome objections". Don't "go for the close". Focus, instead on delivering lasting value to the PERSON you are meeting with....in whatever form that looks like.

When you can demonstrate that you understand what motivates your prospect/client, they will ultimately sell themself on whatever it is you're "selling".

Good luck! - by Terri
One of my contacts who has been receiving brochures for a few months now, finally ordered some expensive products. I'm not sure what her motivation is because she and her husband just lost their business and are both looking for jobs. It seems strange that this is the time she would order a lot of stuff for the first time.

Is she spending because she is depressed? - by ozzie
How do you develop trust?

Simple. By creating meaningful encounters with prospects/clients.

How do you do that?

Simple. Take yourself and your own agenda out of the equation. Don't "pitch". Don't "overcome objections". Don't "go for the close". Focus, instead on delivering lasting value to the PERSON you are meeting with....in whatever form that looks like.

When you can demonstrate that you understand what motivates your prospect/client, they will ultimately sell themself on whatever it is you're "selling".
That kind of advice has been taught to tens of thousands of salespeople that learned consultative selling. You may be one of the minority that have been able to make it work. - by JacquesWerth
When you can demonstrate that you understand what motivates your prospect/client, they will ultimately sell themself on whatever it is you're "selling".
Please provide more information Terri. At face value your post appears inaccurate. - by SalesCoach
It is possible that I am among the minority that has been able to reach high levels of sales success without using a “sales pitch”. I’m certainly not special, though. I’m just a person who got tired of the extreme competitiveness found in most sales processes. I got tired of committing myself 100% to the client and not receiving the same commitment back. I got tired of putting on my sales face to “go for the close” and all that rah-rah-rah-rah. It is only BECAUSE I got tired of this “rat race” that I started doing things differently.

Basically, I wanted a heightened sense of personal satisfaction with my career and I wasn’t finding it by using classic sales techniques that focus on “getting the sale”.

I think I should start all my entries by stating, “don’t believe a word I’m saying”. All I can talk about and write about are my personal experiences in sales where I sold over $90,000 / month in professional services.

Most sales processes that are used today have the essence of competition at their core. Businesses find themselves competing against each other and sometimes even against their clients. Competition is seen as the normal way of doing business in an era characterized by commoditization. The commoditization trap that many businesses find themselves in causes them to lower their prices while the cost and complexity of doing business increases. Shrinking profits and lower margins create a fear-based mentality that pushes competitiveness to a new level. Closing the deal quickly becomes more important than offering real value to the client. I call this a “Competitive Sales Process”. It is one that most people are trained to use and does not honor a (sales)person’s innate ability to develop trust and create a meaningful encounter with prospects/clients.

Now before people get all excited, I’m not saying that ALL training is like this. There are exceptions, of course. I am, however, referring to The Majority. And what I have seen, is that The Majority of people in business…..whether they’re in sales or another field…..are not happy. The Majority are stressed out. The Majority put in their time and deliver an average performance.

When I talk about removing yourself and your own agenda out of the equation, I am encouraging people to place their focus on the needs of the prospect instead. The sales process is about them. Uncover their motives…..their highest moral values…. Let them feel understood…...Provide some value…..Build trust. Get the sale.

I hope that helps.

-Terri - by Terri
When you can demonstrate that you understand what motivates your prospect/client, they will ultimately sell themself on whatever it is you're "selling".
Without further clarification my opinion is that your post is too general to be accurate. Clients don't ultimately sell themselves on what it is you're selling because they feel understood. That is only part of the equation. - by SalesCoach
You are right, "Coach". A prospect's feeling of being understood is one part of the equation.....which is why I added the last paragraph to my post JUST for you. Again, I can only speak to what worked for me.....

Good luck! - by Terri
What can someone like me do to build trust with prospects?
Bring credibility to the sales call as a recognized expert or authority on what you're selling. sn; - by Slick
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