Home > Education > What is a People Person?

What is a People Person?

How would you describe someone considered to be a "People Person?"

IMO, a "People Person" is:
  • Someone who enjoys interacting with others as evidenced by their daily interactions.
  • Someone who knows how to and is already winning friends and influence people.
  • Someone who enjoys being around people but someone who people enjoy being around as well.
- by Rocket
Hi All!

A people person, in my opinion, whether knowingly or un-knowingly understands the four most important words in the universe when it comes to dealing with other people - "MMFI" or "Make Me Feel Important!" ;)

Imagine this on everyone's forehead when you interact with them - people have won wars, overcame tremendous obstacles and achieved greatness when they have felt appreciated and valued.

When you come across someone who understands MMFI and makes you feel important, you can't quite put a finger on it, but you know that they have that special something that makes them nice to be around.

Tony D - Sales Journey - by Tonyd
Hi All!

A people person, in my opinion, whether knowingly or un-knowingly understands the four most important words in the universe when it comes to dealing with other people - "MMFI" or "Make Me Feel Important!" ;)

Imagine this on everyone's forehead when you interact with them - people have won wars, overcame tremendous obstacles and achieved greatness when they have felt appreciated and valued.

When you come across someone who understands MMFI and makes you feel important, you can't quite put a finger on it, but you know that they have that special something that makes them nice to be around.
I have never heard it put that way but good point. Make me feel important. :) - by AZBroker
How would you describe someone considered to be a "People Person?"
This subject came up yesterday when discussing a real life situation close to home.

I've concluded that a "people person", one who is rewarded the most from interacting with an increasing exposure to other people, is someone who allows others to become part of their world, and, is willing to become part of others' lives by contributing to their well being.

I don't think my own viewpoint, as expressed above, could be summed up in an acronym such as "make me feel important" or any other technique. I have become cliche' and technique weary. I look for evidence in what I see around me on a daily basis. In the meaningful interactions of people, where moods, circumstances, and daily struggles with life sometimes take center stage, "feeling important" can have a short shelf life. Giving love, and being loved, can sustain a meaningful existence for a lifetime.

Everybody reading this already is important. That's a fact. You sure don't need me to make you feel it. - by Gary Boye
Hi!

Excellent points.

Sometimes, in today's often hurried, frantic world, I come across hard working, honest, sincere people who could do with a good old slap on the back, a word of encouragement, a listerning ear or just a warm hug. Yes they are being themselves and yes they are willing to become part of others lives and enrich them. But sometimes, we all need a bit of encouragement and support, and it is this that I try to portray in "Make me feel important". Yes everyone IS important, but we need to appreciate that sometimes people just don't FEEL important, or worthy, or appreciated. MMFI simply states that everyone has a tag on their forehead which, as a basic human need, means "I have feelings too, help me feel appreciated, I count, help make me feel this".

Your right, feeling important can have a short "Shelf life". But I prefer to deal with people in a way that makes them feel loved, appreciated and important.

Tony D - Sales Journey - by Tonyd
Your right, feeling important can have a short "Shelf life". But I prefer to deal with people in a way that makes them feel loved, appreciated and important.
Important, appreciated, liked, loved....they all boil down to the same basic human need we all have to feel accepted for who we are - unconditionally. A People Person does this with amazing consistency and sincerity. - by Irene Morales Ward
In my previous career I was a middle and high school teacher and I was 100% a student people person. What that meant to me was that I loved to be with them, I respected them and as Gary said let them into my life and I entered theirs, and I always had their interests in my heart and did the best I could to be of service to them.

Because they knew I respected them I got respect and had relatively few conflicts outside the normal adolescent situations.

Today I take the same interest in people and I don't have an agenda in mind for the use of the interest other than what's in their best interest and it may not be what I might have to offer - then, nor would it be in my best interest to go that route.

What's most important is honesty - not pumping someone up or making someone feel a certain way - it's respect - which is being attentive to someone and being honest - and giving straight answers that are free from anything suggesting an agenda I want them to pursue.

That's the best I can come up with tonight. - by MitchM
I've concluded that a "people person", one who is rewarded the most from interacting with an increasing exposure to other people, is someone who allows others to become part of their world, and, is willing to become part of others' lives by contributing to their well being.

I don't think my own viewpoint, as expressed above, could be summed up in an acronym such as "make me feel important" or any other technique...Giving love, and being loved, can sustain a meaningful existence for a lifetime.
I think there is a genuineness that is implicit to Gary's viewpoint--letting other people into your life and being part of other's lives too.

Making someone feel important is one of the potential consequences of that interaction, if it is genuine. "Making people feel important" as a technique, or as Gary points out, any other technique, is ineffective unless it springs from genuine caring.

Which makes me start to think that "sales training" is really a misnomer -- the skill being taught isn't about sales, it's about how to express genuine human interest and caring in a professional manner. And that assumes that the genuine human interest and caring is already there. (It also assumes that the product or service being sold will genuinely help the person buying.)

Of course line of discussion may be for a different thread... - by Terri Zwierzynski
Weekly Updates!
Questions and Answers about Selling
Subscribe to our mailing list to get threads and posts sent to your email address weekly - Free of Charge.