Home > Direct Marketing > Email Cold Calling: Spam?

Email Cold Calling: Spam?

After a brief hiadas I've decided to get back into business. I couldn't be happier. At first I had 3 clients waiting. Those have since been completely serviced and satisfied.

I'm in the web-development business and have been doing it in several capacities for the past 10-12 years.

My new direction is catering to a specific niche or specific industry where there are hardly any firms that cater to this specific industry sector.

Over the past two months I've developed several pieces of software that would be very beneficial to businesses in this industry. However, its getting in contact with them that is difficult.

As I surf the web and come across a company's website, I can instantly spot troubled areas in their website layout and I get so close to firing off an email about how I can provide a better solution than what they have online.

But, I don't want to come across as another spammer.

Would anyone have any suggestions of how to approach the "initial contact" via email? I've never been good at cold calling on the phone or in person, so I thought if I can pull together a few "script" emails that are uniform and informative, I could better my chances of generating more contracts and new clients.

thanks in advance. - by tjrockjockwv
I've been using e-cards which Avon provides for those of us with a website and office online. I like using them rather than sending an all text message. Where do you get your email lists? - by ozzie
Unsolicited email is SPAM so I think you've got two strikes against you from the start. If your emails don't ring a bell then strike three and you're out. If you do know what your prospect wants then you can write your offer around that. - by Gilbert
i even thought about browsing the prospective client's site looking for a particular product that I know they don't have listed, and then maybe call in. . . .

say, "hey, I'm looking for xyz widget, I see that its not listed on your site."

Hoping they respond, "Yeah, we need to update our site more often. Its just so hard to keep it up-to-date."

Its an open door at that point, wouldn't you think?? - by tjrockjockwv
Its an open door at that point, wouldn't you think??
I don't think so. How would you make the transition from a customer calling in to a salesperson providing a solution? - by Gilbert
hmmm. . . . any ideas? - by tjrockjockwv
hmmm. . . . any ideas?
Not right now but if I get a humdinger I'll post it here. ;sm - by Gilbert
cool. much appreciated. - by tjrockjockwv
Would anyone have any suggestions of how to approach the "initial contact" via email?
Have you thought about using the email like an introduction letter? The email could be a brief introduction that finishes by saying, "I'll be calling you in the next 2-3 days to get your opinion on this."

Your thoughts? - by SpeedRacer
That's great idea Speedracer. I agree of what you've said. It's very effective for me because I've done it. - by shinningstar
I think that there are so many cold-call type emails out there that it would be tough to make a connection with one.

I think I'd be most likely to respond positively to one that got right to the point, and didn't seem to be a form letter.

That's my opinion. ;bl - by Ricardo
you can read it how you like, but i consider spam and unsolicited mails differently. SPAM is irrelevant, random firing of emails en masse without consideration or consequence.

i'm pleased with the success I've had by targeted soliciting of emails. compared to what you might get by phone etc/ by email it's energy efficient. you may want to read my previous posts and see a few things i got write and wrong.

build a contact list and customize each message so it looks like you wrote it personally (lots of mailer tools help do this)

good luck - by PRO-Crastinator
you can read it how you like, but i consider spam and unsolicited mails differently. SPAM is irrelevant, random firing of emails en masse without consideration or consequence.
I like this definition of SPAM: "unsolicited electronic mail; the internet version of junk mail". - by SpeedRacer
Semantics. I'm no spammer. For a prospect my actions are less intrusive and less costly than typical canvassing by phone.

Take your pick and do what's right for You.

Good luck - by PRO-Crastinator
If you send me an unsoliticed email and I perceive it as SPAM then it is SPAM and gets deleted. Perception rules. Send me the spammiest email you've got and if I want what you're offering then your email might not be viewed as SPAM at all. Again, perception rules. - by AZBroker
After a brief hiadas I've decided to get back into business. I couldn't be happier. At first I had 3 clients waiting. Those have since been completely serviced and satisfied.

I'm in the web-development business and have been doing it in several capacities for the past 10-12 years.

My new direction is catering to a specific niche or specific industry where there are hardly any firms that cater to this specific industry sector.

Over the past two months I've developed several pieces of software that would be very beneficial to businesses in this industry. However, its getting in contact with them that is difficult.

As I surf the web and come across a company's website, I can instantly spot troubled areas in their website layout and I get so close to firing off an email about how I can provide a better solution than what they have online.

But, I don't want to come across as another spammer.

Would anyone have any suggestions of how to approach the "initial contact" via email? I've never been good at cold calling on the phone or in person, so I thought if I can pull together a few "script" emails that are uniform and informative, I could better my chances of generating more contracts and new clients.

thanks in advance.
Of course this is just an opinion and observation, but factual as well. When you are finding the information on someone's website..that says "Contact Us" , I have never seen anything stipulating on anyone's website "Contact Us...but ONLY if you plan on buying from us" At that point they have made it publicly accessable information.

Now...an approach that is subtle and may pull a response, is sending a note requesting a call back because you have some questions about their website and leave it at that! It is their website, and part of their business...so, my guess would be they would think, "Questions...what kind of questions?" and reply, I would.

Of course, using your signature line effectively as well.

Also, be sure you include your full contact information, with a note/subcript stating if they no longer wish to recieve any communications, please reply with remove in the subject line.

To Your Success,

Kelly Gerards - by Kelly Gerards
Send me the spammiest email you've got and if I want what you're offering then your email might not be viewed as SPAM at all. Again, perception rules.
I would be that way and I bet so would everyone else so you have to put some effort into the email instead of just sending a generic message to as many people as you can get email addresses for. - by Thomas
Why don't you record a screencast of their website with some of the ideas you have to help them.

Save the resulting video to dvd/cd and send it to them with a covering letter explaining that this is just a few simple ideas but that you could show them massive improvements if they would like to call you. - by helisell
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