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Questions about Persuasion....

Hi I'm new to this forum and would just like to put some things out there....

1) What kind of useful advice can anyone here give about persuading a client.

I would very much like if I wasnt told to smile or to relax or to have shiny shoes or to look really good, I mean come on all thats pretty obvious. Im looking for actual things that I can say/do to greatly increase the probability that the client will go along with what I suggest.

Why is that every time I speak to a sales person they have advice for me, advice like give them two choices, be yourself, just sell the client man. Its like there's some kind of secret code to selling that they themselves are unable to decipher.

This surely sounds cynical but all of the sales training that I've gone through all have the same Dale Carnegie stuff rehashed and served up on a different plate!!! - by harmlessdot
What was the dale cargenie stuff like? - by Thomas
Are you looking for something situation specific or general advice? - by Houston
Im looking for actual things that I can say/do to greatly increase the probability that the client will go along with what I suggest.
For compliance try these principles of persuasion: consistency, social proof, liking, authority and scarcity. Do you need examples of these in action for what you're offering? - by Liberty
don't you think there might be a reason everything has some dale Carnegie stuff in it....it might be because it works....here are some tips....
Always agree (there are exceptions)...
use good word tracking (i wouldn't expect you to buy if....)
make them feel comfatable (we are both way too worked up lets just relax and make a logical decsion and look at the facts..) - by benjamin-benjamin
Also, the Dale Carnegie Sales Trainingg aspects have worked wonders for me.

Basically, persuade your client by leading them (in a sincere way, not exploitive) to see the value of what you're selling to them personally. There are amazing ways to listen to their answers to decipher their personal true buying motives. It might be vanity; it might be pride; there are endless possibilities... but once you've found it for a particular prospect, offering to meet that need will result in a sale. - by Coda1108
Harmlessdot,

I can not agree with you anymore. It is refreshing to find someone who realizes that while those Dale Carnegie techniques where useful in the day they where written. People are getting tired and agrivated by these old techniqes that are known to everyone. Even people not in the sales community.

I would suggest you do the opposite, that would really spin your clients head around, as well as a few people reading this.

For instance you've been told to act yourself. I say STOP doing that. You are not happy with those results so stop doing it.

Start acting like your customers. Think about this for just a minute. Are you more likely to buy something from someone you know nothing about or someone who is familuar to you, like a friend?

Any person who is honest with themselves will say their friends over the person they know nothing about.

Now ask yourself why is this. Well one because they trust them more. The second is because they are more like the one person they trust more than anyone else, themselves.

So the question is how can you be more like them or someone they trust. The simple answer is to build rapport. There are plenty of rapport building techniqes available so I won't waste any of your time telling you about them. I just suggest you find one or even a few that work best for you, practice them so they become second nature and I suspect you will see your sales soar. ;co - by Jorel
With all due respect, what you suggest (build rapport; think like your customer) are 2 (and only the tip of the iceberg) methods Dale Carnegie Sales Training teaches/covers.

Keep in mind, there is a huge difference between the Dale Carnegie Communications values, and its Sales Training courses. The sales training, while based on the communications principles, are more about understanding your customer, and the value of what you're selling to your customer from THEIR point of view.


Gone are the days of "Be nice and people will like you and therefore buy from you" Instead, it's like you wrote... think like your customer.

Just for the record, I have absolutely no interest in, or gain in any way from others using the DC method. I just know how much it did for me and my sales practices. - by Coda1108
Coda,

You are right, it is only the tip of the iceberg. There is obviously no way in a post I could cover all the different techniques to use. You can easily see that if you do not have rapport then nothing else will work.

I also mentioned rapport because I believe studies have taken rapport so much further than what DC has done and that if you have good enough rapport you do not need anything else.

For instance when I got in sales and admitatly knew nothing; when I made my first sale because of rapport. To be perfectly honest it was a friend, a neighbor who I had known for well over 10 years. I did not need to know any of the other sales techniques I have since learned.

I am also happy to hear that the DC worked for you in the past. Heck I would be happy if the cave man technique to selling worked. If something is working I am going to be the last one to knock it. I just think that people just now gettting into sales have such better option and there is no sense in learning the same stuff that customers have learned to dispise in sales.

I say this because my first sales coach was like this He had been doing sales training for 30 years and had not updated his process. Yes it worked, but there where better ways available to him and now everyone else. He was just to set in his ways to want to change.

I just hope other do not fall for this same line of sales teachings and from what was orginally posted harmlessdot he wanted a new approach not just something rehashed. - by Jorel
You can easily see that if you do not have rapport then nothing else will work.
Why?

I also mentioned rapport because I believe studies have taken rapport so much further than what DC has done and that if you have good enough rapport you do not need anything else.
How is that possible? Wouldn't the product being the right solution be more important?

I just hope other do not fall for this same line of sales teachings and from what was orginally posted harmlessdot he wanted a new approach not just something rehashed.
What line of sales teachings, Dale Carnegie? - by Thomas
Why?

Well why do you think? Think about that for just a minute ... I think because if you have the opposite to rapport which is coldness or unfriendlyness it is going to be very difficult to sell someone anything

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jorel
I also mentioned rapport because I believe studies have taken rapport so much further than what DC has done and that if you have good enough rapport you do not need anything else.

How is that possible? Wouldn't the product being the right solution be more important?


You ask some interesting questions. But let me ask you this. How do you know what the right product is? Is it the product that the customer thinks he wants? Is is the product you are selling? Is it the cheapest product or the product that is the best value.

In any case, I hope you believe you have the best product available to your client. But even if you do and you do not develop rapport with your client he may or may not buy from you. He may choose to buy from your competitor because he had better rapport with this particular customer.


What line of sales teachings, Dale Carnegie?

Any line of sales teaching that does not benefit the client. - by Jorel
Why?

Well why do you think? Think about that for just a minute ... I think because if you have the opposite to rapport which is coldness or unfriendlyness it is going to be very difficult to sell someone anything
You know more about this than I do but I don't think you are in rapport or you are cold or unfriendly. That sounds extreme.

You ask some interesting questions. But let me ask you this. How do you know what the right product is? Is it the product that the customer thinks he wants? Is is the product you are selling? Is it the cheapest product or the product that is the best value.
I think the right product is the product the customers say is right for them. It looked like you were saying that if you have good enough rapport you do not need anything else.

What line of sales teachings, Dale Carnegie?

Any line of sales teaching that does not benefit the client.
What Dale Carnegie books is everyone talking about? - by Thomas
You know more about this than I do but I don't think you are in rapport or you are cold or unfriendly. That sounds extreme.

I put in an extreme example to make a point, but let me try an analogy instead. Suppose a salesman is selling furniture. He does not have good rapport or bad rapport. All he does is show the customer what they ask for, a chair. The customer sits in the chair, likes it but decides it is best to look at other options.

Goes next door to another furniture store. Where this sales man asks why he is buying a chair now. Customer says to watch the superbowl game. Salesman says oh really what team do you want to win. Chicago. Me too, I grew up in Chicago on the south side. Do you need this chair delivered. Oh no I have a truck. But your chair costs more than the same chair next door. Tell you what, for a fellow Bears fan I will take ten bucks off, how does that sound. Great the customer buys the chair. Whithout a second thought of the other salesperson who probally would have went down even lower but because he built no rapport the customer did not bother to go back and ask him because he did not want to say no to a fellow Bears fan.

I think the right product is the product the customers say is right for them. It looked like you were saying that if you have good enough rapport you do not need anything else.

In most cases the salesperson should be the expert on the product not the customer. After all a customer is buying one, the salesperson is selling many. So because a customer says I want widget A because it is cheaper. You can tell him, I understand you want widget A because it is cheaper. You want to save the most amount of money. And when you buy widget B it can do everything widget A plus it comes with this other features that widget A does not. Now do you want to save a few dollars or are you worth the extra features that widget B has.

Now somepeople have no use for those features and sell them widget A, but alot of the time people prefer value over price and if you can show them a better value that is what they really want, they just always do not know it at first.


What Dale Carnegie books is everyone talking about?


How to Win Friends and Influence People first written in 1936. I think this book has some very good points, but I also think people have evolved a little since 1936 so must sales techiniques.

Principle 5 get the othe person to say yes, yes imediately.

For example

"Spell SPOT three times."
"S P O T , S P O T , S P O T"
"What do you do when you come to a green light?"
(answer is invariably-) "Stop!"
"What, at a GREEN light?"

I believe a lot of people have caught onto this. - by Jorel
It looked like you were saying that if you have good enough rapport you do not need anything else.
I got the same impression Jorel. Can you cover this a little more? Thank you. ;sm - by Slick
I got the same impression Jorel. Can you cover this a little more? Thank you. ;sm

When you say "this", what do you mean specifically? I don't want to go off on a tangent to is irrelevant. - by Jorel
I think the right product is the product the customers say is right for them. It looked like you were saying that if you have good enough rapport you do not need anything else.

Now somepeople have no use for those features and sell them widget A, but alot of the time people prefer value over price and if you can show them a better value that is what they really want, they just always do not know it at first.
Some people do prefer value over price but how does that work with if you have good enough rapport you don't need anything else?

What Dale Carnegie books is everyone talking about?

Principle 5 get the othe person to say yes, yes imediately.

For example

"Spell SPOT three times."
"S P O T , S P O T , S P O T"
"What do you do when you come to a green light?"
(answer is invariably-) "Stop!"
"What, at a GREEN light?"

I believe a lot of people have caught onto this.
I read that book and kind of remember the technique and that wasn't how it was explained. I remember it saying the idea was getting people in a receptive mindset not tricking them like in your example. - by Thomas
When you say "this", what do you mean specifically? I don't want to go off on a tangent to is irrelevant.
I meant the text in red, "if you have good enough rapport you do not need anything else."

Using your example of a salesman selling furniture imagine that after the $10 discount the price of the chair was still 50% higher than what the customer would have paid with the first salesman. Do you believe the customer would have still bought because of "rapport"? What if the difference was 40%, 30%, 20%. At what price do you need more than "rapport"?
- by Slick
I wish I could answer your question but I prefer to be honest and tell you I do not know. I am believe you would rather have an honest answer than an answer you can not rely on.

But think of it this way as far as percentages. Many would probally pay at least $2 for a candybar from someone they know, like a child. Even though they know they can get that same candybar at the store for less than $1.

In the end, I believe it is going to depend on three things.
First how bad the customer really wants a product or service.
Second how much in rapport the salesperson has with the customer.
Third is price difference, if you are comparing apples to apples and oranges to oranges.

This is probally something you already knew, I just wanted to point out while I may have some answers, I can assure you I do not have them all. But everyday I work to gain more answers. ;sm - by Jorel
wrote in part:
"Why is that every time I speak to a sales person they have advice for me, advice like give them two choices, be yourself, just sell the client man. Its like there's some kind of secret code to selling that they themselves are unable to decipher.

This surely sounds cynical but all of the sales training that I've gone through all have the same Dale Carnegie stuff rehashed and served up on a different plate!!!"
I promise that you will not find any Dale Carnegie like stuff in High Probability Selling (HPS). That is because HPS is based on research into how the Top 1% of salespeople actually sell. These people typically earn over $1 million per year.

Ironically, they cannot say how they do it, because they don't know; they just do it intuitively.

We learned what they do by observing 312 of the top salespeople in 23 different industries, while they were working. - by JacquesWerth
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