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What's your sales message?

When a client asks you, "why should I buy your _________"?
Whatever you say next is what I call your sales message.

Mine is….

Q. "Why should I buy your _________"?
A. I’m not sure IF you should.
The way I work is I’d like to understand YOUR situation so that I can determine if what I offer provides you a solution that we both feel comfortable with, ok?

If they say yes then they’ve bought me and my intent and that’s the best first step I could take.

What do you guys use? - by Tony Dunne
When a client asks you, "why should I buy your _________"?
Whatever you say next is what I call your sales message.

Mine is….

Q. "Why should I buy your _________"?
A. I’m not sure IF you should.
The way I work is I’d like to understand YOUR situation so that I can determine if what I offer provides you a solution that we both feel comfortable with, ok?

If they say yes then they’ve bought me and my intent and that’s the best first step I could take.

What do you guys use?
I don't get asked that question. When people ask me what I do I say, "I help people buy or sell manufactured homes". - by Thomas
Do you think the Sales Message is the same as your Value proposition? If someone asked me, what are 3 reasons i should buy from your company, I considered that my Value Proposition.

Susan - by susana
I think your sales message should be what you truly believe your product does for people. The questions in the buyers mind is: why should I buy from you? Why should I listen to what you have to say? What's in it for me?

Once you can answer these 3 questions, you have your sales message. Even though the customer will not ask you these questions most of the time, they are thinking it in their minds.

The best way to deliver your sales message is to identify and illustrate the problems of what you are selling solve, and communicate them to the prospect.

You can do this with marketing as well as face to face selling. Always ask questions of your prospect, and explore what their needs are. When you know what your customers want, you can deliver it to them. Don't try to sell them something they don't want. The secret of successful selling is knowing what your customers want, educating them on how they can benefit, and educating them on how to buy.

Customers need to know how they will FEEL once they have your product, and you can show them how others have felt, and allow them to understand ulimately how they will feel once they have your products.

People want to buy, but they don't always like to be sold.

Focusing on the customer, and their needs and wants, is the way to go in my experience. - by Timwelch
Snowman

Really good question. My take on it is that customers (in the industry I work in anyway, which is automotive) find it hard to work out how they're going to decide between the 3 or 4 products that they've shortlisted to look at.
So what they're actually asking for is some thoughts on what's important and what can they compare. - by marky
I think your sales message should be what you truly believe your product does for people. The questions in the buyers mind is: why should I buy from you? Why should I listen to what you have to say? What's in it for me?

Once you can answer these 3 questions, you have your sales message. Even though the customer will not ask you these questions most of the time, they are thinking it in their minds.
Good thoughts, and I agree. :thup I think that the second two questions are actually more important than "why should I buy from you?" People can tell when something is sincere... and sufficient answers to those second and third questions will end up being very important. - by destiny
I think your sales message should be what you truly believe your product does for people. The questions in the buyers mind is: why should I buy from you? Why should I listen to what you have to say? What's in it for me?

...Focusing on the customer, and their needs and wants, is the way to go in my experience.
For many customers, their needs and wants are often decided by emotions.

When I owned a specialty themed gift store in a mall, I trained my employees to realize that if someone walked into the store, the interest in the product was a given. It was their job to step that interest up to an emotional desire, and then to close by making it an immediate "need". In all great honesty all we really sold was permission to act on an already established desire.

Looking at pre-owned manufactured homes, there is a given desire to make the sales process as quick and easy as possible for both the buyer and seller.

I'll base my sales message on fulfilling that desire. I'll take what is often preceived as an time-consuming (thus expensive), emotional headache, and turn it into a time-saving, extremely cost-effective, headache-free experience. Again, all I'll really be selling is permission to act on an already established desire.

Pam - by LadySmith
Do you guys think this is the same as a value statement?

I think they are different :cu , my sales message is the WAY I do something and a value statement is WHY you should do it with me isn’t it?

Snowman - by Tony Dunne
Isn't a sales message an offer and a value statement a claim? - by Mustang
When a client asks you, "why should I buy your _________"?
Whatever you say next is what I call your sales message.

Mine is….

Q. "Why should I buy your _________"?
A. I’m not sure IF you should.
The way I work is I’d like to understand YOUR situation so that I can determine if what I offer provides you a solution that we both feel comfortable with, ok?
Do you guys think this is the same as a value statement?

I think they are different :cu , my sales message is the WAY I do something and a value statement is WHY you should do it with me isn’t it?

Snowman
Snowman,

Your sales message is what I like to refer to as a "foot-in the door" message. (I feel that "IF" statement creates subconscious emotional desire.) If you've done your homework, you've already determined that the potential customer would benefit from your product.

It doesn't matter whether the customer should buy from you or anyone else if the product isn't something they need or want. Although I do understand that pre-qualifying for the salesman, sometimes happens before the customer realizes they want or need a specific product depending on the industry.

After you get your foot in the door, and ask appropriate questions to determine both logical needs and emotional wants, then you can properly adjust a value statement to reflect those needs/wants.

Pam - by LadySmith
Snowman,

If you've done your homework, you've already determined that the potential customer would benefit from your product.

Pam

Pam
I may believe they need my product but I don’t want to cause resistance by telling them they need it in the first 60 seconds, that’s why taking a “I’m not sure if you do” and a “diagnostic approach”, helps to lessen resistance so I can get to the point where I can confirm my research or assumption that they do need or want my product.

Snowman - by Tony Dunne
Pam
I may believe they need my product but I don’t want to cause resistance by telling them they need it in the first 60 seconds, that’s why taking a “I’m not sure if you do” and a “diagnostic approach”, helps to lessen resistance so I can get to the point where I can confirm my research or assumption that they do need or want my product.
Snowman,

I can understand that, and I was sure you had already prequalified your customer.

But what you are talking about is a sales opening designed to get your foot in the door, not a sales message. (It is one of my favorite openings by the way.);bg

Pam - by LadySmith
very thought provoking
its funny you think you know what clients want but the reality is
no one actually asks them.imagine how great your rapport would be if you adopted this approach.
i intend to start using that wordtrack myself.
i will let you know how it goes
thanks snowman;sm - by Muzza
I think that's a great non-confrontational opening to a customer that has probably heard it all and is over the "garden variety" sales consultant. I know if i went some where and the salesperson opened with that i'd be interested to know where he was going to go with it. hence i'd listen for a while longer. and if i didn't buy i'd remember the salesperson.
i'm going to use that..
cheers snowman. - by Muzza
if someone asks me why should i buy yours, then i would tell him the benifits of our company and give him more offers than my rivals - by mtajim
Q: Why should I buy your software marketing system?

A: Well "__________" if you have all the customers you could ever handle and if your bank account is full......then you don't need to.
Is that what you are telling me "____________"?:sa

And then if that's not the case, then I'm sure it's worth 30 minutes of your life to learn how you could double your profits in the next 6-12 months. - by Kelly Gerards
I learned quick in real estate that when a seller asked me "why should I use your service?" they were either asking:

"Why should I use your service instead of doing it myself?"
or
"Why should I use your service instead of another agent?"

Two different questions with two different answers and two different presentations. - by realtor
Two different questions with two different answers and two different presentations.
I can see that happening.

Some people might have an opinion different from mine of what a sales message is. I posted my interpretation of what a "sales message" in another thread - http://www.salespractice.com/forums/t-4146.html - by SpeedRacer
Thanks SpeedRacer, good thread;sm - by Tony Dunne
When a client asks you, "why should I buy your _________"?
Whatever you say next is what I call your sales message.

Mine is….

Q. "Why should I buy your _________"?
A. I’m not sure IF you should.
The way I work is I’d like to understand YOUR situation so that I can determine if what I offer provides you a solution that we both feel comfortable with, ok?

If they say yes then they’ve bought me and my intent and that’s the best first step I could take.

What do you guys use?
First off I think the one asking the questions is the one in control, so I try and put myself in a position to be the one asking the questions, but if this question was put to me. I would reply like ... see below

Q. Why should I use you to refinance my home, when I can just to my bank.

A. Your absolutley right (NOTE: always agree) you can go to your bank and they will probally give you a good loan. And (NOTE: I used "And" not but) if you are like many of my customers you don't want good ... You want the best ... Let me explain how working with me has been the best option for my past clients. First most people have damaging information on their credit report. Banks and other lending institutions use these errors against you by saying since you only have a credit score of x we can only give you a rate of y. As part of my service I actually help you to remove damaging information from your credit report to raise your credit score to get you a lower interest rate. Also when a person goes to a bank, the bank qoutes them one rate. I actually get rates from several lending institutions so I find you the best rate available. After your loan closes I forward a copy of you loan documents to you CPA, so when tax time comes around it is not something you have to go searching for. This is above what any bank I have ever worked with will do for its clients. But I do not stop there either. You see I know if I do the best I can for my clients they are going to refer me business. So what I do Is I show my clients techniques that can be used to pay off their loan sooner, build equity faster or actually leverage that equity to buy property in areas of the US that are still seeing 20% appreciation (according to CNN) so they can build more wealth. Should we get started now or do you have more questoins? - by Jorel
Jorel


How does that approach work for you and whats the thinking behind the words?

Snowman - by Tony Dunne
Jorel


How does that approach work for you and whats the thinking behind the words?

Snowman

Well I am sure as an established businessman you already understand the rule the customer is always right. (or never tell the customer he is wrong)

The use of the word “And” over the word “but” has been documented in many books. It has been proven that in most cases the word “but” negates what was just said and the word “and” includes it. The subconscious picks up on this and starts to find holes in a statement when the word “but” is used against a belief compared to their own statement.

Then I say something that makes sense to them and can not be disputed (the sun came up today). This is called a pace. Then I say something I do a lead (I can help you). The same way a yes set is used but I do not make the person say yes, yes, yes, I let their subconscious do that so that their conscious mind does not pick up on it and dispute my lead. - by Jorel
Fair enough, thanks for the insight. - by Tony Dunne
A colleague of mine told me he put together his answer to this question by asking his existing customers why THEY bought from him……..that’s a good idea because you will be dealing with the reality you create for you customers, not your own opinion of that reality. - by Tony Dunne
Do you think the Sales Message is the same as your Value proposition?
Susan
I think of USP (unique selling proposition) as being the same as "why should I buy from you?" I guess this is the same as value proposition. This is the area I'm working on now. I know my service is unique, but I'm having trouble putting it into words.

Rita - by Rita_Jo
I think of USP (unique selling proposition) as being the same as "why should I buy from you?" I guess this is the same as value proposition. This is the area I'm working on now. I know my service is unique, but I'm having trouble putting it into words.

Rita
Did you ever find a way to put it into words? - by klozer
After further research into the true meaning of USP, it boils down to what I offer that other Virtual Assistants don't. I don't charge for proofreading projects, which I complete for my clients, unless it is specifically a proofreading project. I polled other Virtual Assistants to see whether or not they charge for the time it takes to proofread their clients' projects. They do.

Rita - by Rita_Jo
I guess this is the same as value proposition.
Do you still feel a unique selling proposition is the same as a value proposition? - by Marcus
I feel not charging for proofreading is a value-added service, but not a value proposition.

Rita - by Rita_Jo
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