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Cold call reluctance

Do you get cold call reluctance? - by Thomas
If I'm not feeling my best or am having what I refer to as a low energy day, I have a lot of reluctance to do cold calling. Sometimes I'm even reluctant to pass out my brochures. I do my best work when I feel good physically and mentally. - by ozzie
Call reluctance (fear of failure or fear of rejection) comes in many shapes and forms (stage fright, over-preparing, ...).

IMO, most if not all salespeople encounter call reluctance in one form or another and not just when cold calling. - by BossMan
Call reluctance (fear of failure or fear of rejection) comes in many shapes and forms (stage fright, over-preparing, ...)
What are the different types of call reluctance? - by Thomas
Some days itís easy, other days itís way too difficult, on those days I do something else.

It's all about attitude and mindset;co - by Tony Dunne
I have a great reluctance to cold calling. Some days I have problems making any sort of call. I find email far easier.

However, I also realize the importance of cold calling in many industries. In a retail gift store, I didn't find it nearly as important a sales tool as I probably should have.

Once I force myself to make cold calls, I find I'm rather good at it, and if I let myself, I actually begin to enjoy it.

In manufactured home brokering, I will be using it quite a bit. I've been thinking quite a bit about various sales tools, and this seems to be one that will likely be extremely effective.

In a retail store in a mall environment, all I had to do was wait for a customer to walk in the store. In bokering manufactured homes, I can't wait and hope that someone will just walk in.

I think I'll be fine with cold calls this time. I have a great confidence in the importance of the service I'll be offering. The biggest difference is I see it as a necessary step in the sales process.

Pam - by LadySmith
This may sound too simplistic, but really..... if you don't like cold-calling, don't do it.

After years spent in the recruitment/staffing industry, I always found that if people would allow themselves the freedom to focus on the activities they LOVE doing, their performance sky-rockets.

Yes, cold-calling still needs to get done. But, if you don't like it, partner with someone who does! There are actually people out there who LOVE cold-calling. If you're at your best being in front of people, spend your time doing that instead. - by Terri
This may sound too simplistic, but really..... if you don't like cold-calling, don't do it.

After years spent in the recruitment/staffing industry, I always found that if people would allow themselves the freedom to focus on the activities they LOVE doing, their performance sky-rockets.
Don't most people usually find at least one aspect of a job that they don't want to do? - by Gilbert
Yes, most people usually find at least one aspect of a job that they don't want to do. That's why most people are not top performers. Most people put in the time for an average performance. My point is to focus on what you love and to surround yourself with others who have complementary strengths. Everyone (you, your colleagues, your clients, your company) wins using a model like this. - by Terri
My point is to focus on what you love and to surround yourself with others who have complementary strengths. Everyone (you, your colleagues, your clients, your company) wins using a model like this.
Is this an option in most sales jobs? What would an example be for retail sales? - by realtor
Yes, this is an option in most jobs.

For people committed to excellence, the starting point is to have a frank discussion with your team members about your strengths. People usually only know their own strengths and have a vague sense of the strengths in others....in fact.....I think most people expect their bosses to "just know" their strengths. <ahem> They don't.

A frank discussion of strengths will allow everyone on the team to know where they can rely upon each other. If management hasn't hired a team with complementary strengths, there may be some overlap of skills and competenices in some areas and a severe deficiency of skills and competencies in other areas.

If a person wants to rise to the top of their profession in their chosen field, they have to take responsibility for it. The easiest way to do this is to have a "strengths-based discussion". - by Terri
Terri,

I agree with many of your statements in theory, however I think it's a bit too simplistic approach.

What about someone like me that will be running a one person business (at least in the very beginning)? I