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Where Do You See Yourself Five Years From Now?

I love the New Year. It is a magical time when you can start new. People believe that anything is possible. Out with the old and in with the new. How about those of you that are unemployed? How do you see the New Year? Is it half empty or half full?

My thought is that no matter what your employment status was last year, you have an opportunity to take control and make better decision-making choices this year. Enough of the excuses. You must be part of the solution or always be part of the problem. You decide. Come to the conclusion that your job search is not working and that you will make a conscious effort in 2007 to be open to new job ready possibilities. This year work closely with your on-line Job Ready Strategist. It’s FREE. Promise!!! Think of me as your personal job coach. I will pump you up and help you get a job sooner rather than later.

Today we begin with the most asked interview questions and how to answer them.
The first question is:
Where do you see yourself in the next five years?

Before I provide an answer, how would you respond?

SCENARIO: You are applying for a cashier at the local Gap store.

Mr. Gap, I am glad you asked me that question. In the next five years, I see myself working for the Gap. I see myself being the best Cashier the Gap ever hired. Mr. Gap and in the next five years if Management sees fit to want to promote me, I would welcome the opportunity. Mr. Gap, that’s where I see myself in the next five years.

Principals of the Question:
• Always give the impression that you will be with this company forever.
• Always sell yourself on the position you are applying for and that you will be the best.
• Finally, if Management sees fit (not you) to promote you, (take a breath) you will be open to the opportunity.

You can use this response to the five year question, with any position that you are seeking. Try it. :thu - by job ready strategist
I intend to be very successful with selling Avon Products. I've been reading the success stories of other women just like me who have done it. I've seen the numbers of some of the women I know who are successful. I plan to be one of them. - by ozzie
Today we begin with the most asked interview questions and how to answer them.
The first question is:
Where do you see yourself in the next five years?


Principals of the Question:
• Always give the impression that you will be with this company forever.
• Always sell yourself on the position you are applying for and that you will be the best.
• Finally, if Management sees fit (not you) to promote you, (take a breath) you will be open to the opportunity.
These answers sound very flattering, strategist, and may win the hearts of many interviewers. However, if I were interviewing someone, I would be looking for 2 things (again, in almost any job or industry). They are ability to do the job and honesty. I personally view flattery as something akin to perfume. It is nice to smell, but I would never drink it.

I would much prefer the candidate tell me that he will give me 110% for as long as we both believe the business relationship makes sense. I am also not impressed by suck-ups. This type of personality is dangerous. It suggests that the person believes his employment depends on something other than his qualifications. I would rather have mutual respect with my my employees than a false, one-way, we-look-up-to-you mentality among them. Someone who claims he is going to be working for my company forever is either naive (not a quality I cherish) or lying. I might hire a young naive candidate who holds promise, but for anything other than an entry level position,naivity would not be a plus.

Still, the question is a great one. It can identify that candidate with an eye towards the future. If he is thinking of his future, he will probably be thoughtful of mine. If he is clueless, he will probably require a great deal of supervision.


These are my thoughts for what they are worth ;st - by rlabston
These answers sound very flattering, strategist, and may win the hearts of many interviewers. However, if I were interviewing someone, I would be looking for 2 things (again, in almost any job or industry). They are ability to do the job and honesty. I personally view flattery as something akin to perfume. It is nice to smell, but I would never drink it.

I would much prefer the candidate tell me that he will give me 110% for as long as we both believe the business relationship makes sense. I am also not impressed by suck-ups. This type of personality is dangerous. It suggests that the person believes his employment depends on something other than his qualifications. I would rather have mutual respect with my my employees than a false, one-way, we-look-up-to-you mentality among them. Someone who claims he is going to be working for my company forever is either naive (not a quality I cherish) or lying. I might hire a young naive candidate who holds promise, but for anything other than an entry level position,naivity would not be a plus.

Still, the question is a great one. It can identify that candidate with an eye towards the future. If he is thinking of his future, he will probably be thoughtful of mine. If he is clueless, he will probably require a great deal of supervision.


These are my thoughts for what they are worth ;st

Great day rlabson,

Well thought out response. It was to the point and honest. I welcome it. Thank you. I appreciate it. Now to answer it in highlight form.

1. The person should be qualified or they wouldn't most likely be brought in to interview.
2. Some people have such a strong "scent" one would thing they did drink it.
3. Back in the "old days" there used to be loyality from the employer to the