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Do you sell the way your customers want to buy?

What do you do that your customer likes the most during your sales process?

For me I think they like the fact that I put them first and find out as much as possible about them before offering a win-win solution.

Snowman - by Tony Dunne
I quickly observe whether my customer want me to stay and visit while I show Demo products or simply deliver the product or brochure and leave. Many of my customers like visiting while others are busy and want to get on with what they need to do. I try to be flexible and I think they like that. - by ozzie
I first try to become more familiar with the person in front of me. In our place people try create friendship with people they deal, so i have to talk to them in that manner , so that they feel comfortable - by mtajim
People can tell that I'm honest and giving them all the information I have. I think they like that the most. - by Thomas
Is this a difficult question?:cu
Only a few replies.:yi - by Tony Dunne
My approach is very similar to Snowman's. I always put the prospect/client first. In addition, I always aim to leave the prospect/client feeling GOOD. I want to be a breath of fresh air for the people I meet with.

If I can leave the meeting having made the prospect feel good, I have succeeded in creating a meaningful encounter. These meaningful encounters are the foundation of a trusting relationship.

-Terri - by Terri
What do you do that your customer likes the most during your sales process?

For me I think they like the fact that I put them first and find out as much as possible about them before offering a win-win solution.

Snowman

Have you ever felt an instantaneous connection with someone? Like maybe as you sit there, reading what they wrote, and you start to go inside and feel how this person is really listening to you.

And that feeling begins to grow with a spiraling warth of that connection, maybe you were able to imagine a time in your future, say years from now still feeling that sense of indepth connection with this person, and looking back on today as having been the start of it.

See, it is funny how some people can just do that and let it happen right now, because for me it takes a while longer. But I do find that when we're together as you pay attention to someone, and start to realize those values and qualities in them that you hold so dearly for yourself ... with me, that's when you can just make that connection and really feal that penetrating bond. - by Jorel
I ask relevant questions and offer personalized solutions. ;) - by WobblyBox
I ask relevant questions and offer personalized solutions. ;)
Simple and elegant, i like it thmbp2; - by Tony Dunne
What do you do that your customer likes the most during your sales process?

For me I think they like the fact that I put them first and find out as much as possible about them before offering a win-win solution.

Snowman
The first part of your statement is right on! However, what do you want to find out about them, specifically?

Eighty-four percent of prospects who are making important buying decisions want to buy from someone they trust and respect. If you are that person, you have a major competitive edge.

If one of your standards is that you will only sell to prospects that you trust and respect and you know how to determine that almost immediately, you are already doing HPS. - by JacquesWerth
The first part of your statement is right on! However, what do you want to find out about them, specifically?
The things I want to know specifically are:
  • What are they looking for most with this purchase? (Moving toward something or opportunity)
  • Why are they looking to do anything at all? (pain, problem or moving away from something)
  • Their willingness to engage in a process that helps us both determine a good fit in terms of what they want and how I can provide a solution.
  • Their willingness to be open and allow us to connect and build rapport and trust.
- by Tony Dunne
The things I want to know specifically are:
  • What are they looking for most with this purchase? (Moving toward something or opportunity)
  • Why are they looking to do anything at all? (pain, problem or moving away from something)
  • Their willingness to engage in a process that helps us both determine a good fit in terms of what they want and how I can provide a solution.
  • Their willingness to be open and allow us to connect and build rapport and trust.
Your first three points are standard "consultative selling" tactics. The last one is a good concept.

However, a "willingness to be open and allow us to connect and build rapport and trust" won't accomplish much unless you have a process to achieve mutual trust and respect. How do you do that?

How do you "build rapport?" - by JacquesWerth
Your first three points are standard "consultative selling" tactics. The last one is a good concept.

However, a "willingness to be open and allow us to connect and build rapport and trust" won't accomplish much unless you have a process to achieve mutual trust and respect. How do you do that?

How do you "build rapport?"
You might think that the first 3 are standard concepts/tactics; they are standard concepts/tactics but not standard practice.

Mutual trust and respect comes from;
  • Having a process that diagnoses the need and adds value for the prospect with the emotional and logical side of making a decision
  • Open and honest dialogue
  • Not pushing my own agenda if we don’t think it’s a good fit
  • Don’t sell too hard, uncover and provide solutions
  • Allow the customer to feel safe, don’t smother or pressure them

All the best,
Tony - by Tony Dunne
I read the previous post and was waiting for this reply

You might think that the first 3 are standard concepts/tactics; they are standard concepts/tactics but not standard practice.
I can not agree more, I wish these standard concepts where standard practice. Tony I applaude youthmbp2;


As far as how do I build rapport.

1. I assume rapport, before I even meet them.
2. I guage my client as to how good of a mood they are in and be in a little bit better mood and work to improve their mood, so they enjoy talking to me.
3. I speak at the same spead and tonality as my clients
4. I use the same type of sensory words as my clients.
5. I listen first to how something is said and second to what is said.
6. I always agree.
7. I physically mirror their body language.
8. I use humor as often as possible
9. I tell stories
10. I show them testimonials - by Jorel
wrote in part -
"As far as how do I build rapport.
1. I assume rapport, before I even meet them.
2. I guage my client as to how good of a mood they are in and be in a little bit better mood and work to improve their mood, so they enjoy talking to me.
3. I speak at the same spead and tonality as my clients
4. I use the same type of sensory words as my clients.
5. I listen first to how something is said and second to what is said.
6. I always agree.
7. I physically mirror their body language.
8. I use humor as often as possible
9. I tell stories
10. I show them testimonials"
So, using NLP (a quasi-hypnotic process), you try to make your prospects believe that you are just like them, rather than let them know who you really are.

You use simulated mood, stories and humor to try to get them to like you.

You always agree. Is that regardless of how you really feel or what you really believe?

Are your testimonials any better than the testimonials that your competitors show them? Do your prospects believe that you never have any unhappy customers?

Have you ever studied the affects of manipulation and/or intuition on trust. - by JacquesWerth
When you say

So, using NLP (a quasi-hypnotic process), you try to make your prospects believe that you are just like them, rather than let them know who you really are.


I say, I understand how you could see things this way, and I am sure that some how that is useful to you. I also know that when I hear the word try, failure is not far behind, (try and type something on your keyboard, I did not say do it, I said try to do it. If all you did was try then you actually did not type anything on your keyboard. Yoda says, "do or do not, there is not try". So instead of trying to make my prospects believe I am just like them, I do things that my customers are comfortable with, after all most customers are more likely to buy from someone who they are more comfortable with aren't they?

As far as letting my clients know who how I really am, I believe we all act differently in different situation. Most people act different when they are with a child as opposed to when they are at a business confrence. I believe that just because a person acts different in one situation than they do in another it does not mean they are not acting like themselves.


You use simulated mood, stories and humor to try to get them to like you.

I see how since you have never met me you could assume that I simulate my mood. I wonder have you ever listened to a song on the radio or ran into an old friend and your mood has changed instantly? If you are like most people you would say yes and I use techniques similar to this to adjust my mood again to make my customer feel more comfortable with me.

You always agree. Is that regardless of how you really feel or what you really believe?

I have given you previous example of how I agree with someone when I really feel that their opinions differ from my own. I have a belief that I can do more by agreeing with people than arguing with people would you agree?

Are your testimonials any better than the testimonials that your competitors show them? Do your prospects believe that you never have any unhappy customers?

I do not know if my testimonials are better than my competitors? I suppose the only real opinion that matters would be my individual customers. And I certaintly hope my prospects do not believe I never have had any unhappy customers. I mean if I did not have any unhappy customers I would be perfect and since I personally learn better from failure than success, I would not improve as quickly as someone who is willing to make mistakes and learn from them.

Have you ever studied the affects of manipulation and/or intuition on trust.

No, but I am sure the effects of manipulation are not positive would you agree? As far as intution on trust, I believe many of the points I wrote in my previous post help my customers intution build trust with me. I am sure you have a difference of opinion but isn't that what makes these forums such a valuable resource for learning?

Cheers,

J- - by Jorel
Well put Jorel thmbp2; - by Tony Dunne
What do you do that your customer likes the most during your sales process?

For me I think they like the fact that I put them first and find out as much as possible about them before offering a win-win solution.

Snowman
By asking the right questions you have the opportunity to give the customer/client the solution they want! - by Snowboy
The two most important things that I do to build and perpetuate trust and rapport are...

1. Let the prospect/customer know that I am ok with hearing no if they don't think I can help them.

2. Asking poignant questions that touch on key pain points while also illustrating my knowledge of their business and situation.

Hope that helpsthmbp2; - by Mr. Make-It-Rain
Reading this entire thread reveals a basic difference between High Probability Selling and the Traditional Sales paradigm.

In HPS, we only set appointments with prospects that want the benefits of our products and/or services and are ready to spend the time and money to acquire them. They must agree to the following “Rules of Engagement.”

1. The purpose of the meeting is to determine whether we have a mutually beneficial basis for doing business
2. They must schedule a specific amount of uninterrupted time, i.e., 40 minutes, one-hour, 90 minutes, or whatever.
3. We will make a conditional commitment on the decision (yes or no) to go forward with the purchasing process at our first meeting.

Starting at that point changes all of the dynamics of the relationship development process. That is why the HPS process is often perceived as impossible to accomplish.

However, other salespeople spend most of their selling time with prospects who don’t already know what their “pains” are. That is why they advocate so many elaborate, quasi-soft-sell ways to get prospects to open up. - by JacquesWerth
:cu High Probability Selling's "Rules of Engagement" sound quite similar to the Sandler Selling System's Upfront Contract. Which I think illustrates the point that most successful professional selling systems have a lot of the same elements:

1. Have a full pipeline so you don't need the business.

2. Target and prospect the best potential customers you can.

3. Find some reason (pain, needs, problems) that they will want to engage with you over the phone

4. Set an upfront agreement in the formal meeting that details your role and purpose while setting the agenda for the sales process and clarifying that they will make a decision.

5. Get clarity on the reasons they chose to talk and understand how much it is costing them today.

6. Make sure they have the money to invest a solution.

7. Further clarify their decision making process and forward any paperwork to legal.

8. Get a decision and further the relationship.

Just my 2 cents! - by Mr. Make-It-Rain
:cu High Probability Selling's "Rules of Engagement" sound quite similar to the Sandler Selling System's Upfront Contract. Which I think illustrates the point that most successful professional selling systems have a lot of the same elements.
You are confusing our Rules of Engagement, which are agreed upon during the HPS prospecting phone call, with Sandler's entire selling system.

The most significant difference between Sandler and the High Probability Selling process is that HPS is entirely non-manipulative. Sandler's system is all about manipulation.

David Sandler, who I knew personally, was fond of saying that "all selling is manipulation." It is still a credo of the Sandler organization. - by JacquesWerth
Reading this entire thread reveals a basic difference between High Probability Selling and the Traditional Sales paradigm.

In HPS, we only set appointments with prospects that want the benefits of our products and/or services and are ready to spend the time and money to acquire them. They must agree to the following “Rules of Engagement.”

1. The purpose of the meeting is to determine whether we have a mutually beneficial basis for doing business
2. They must schedule a specific amount of uninterrupted time, i.e., 40 minutes, one-hour, 90 minutes, or whatever.
3. We will make a conditional commitment on the decision (yes or no) to go forward with the purchasing process at our first meeting.

Starting at that point changes all of the dynamics of the relationship development process. That is why the HPS process is often perceived as impossible to accomplish.

However, other salespeople spend most of their selling time with prospects who don’t already know what their “pains” are. That is why they advocate so many elaborate, quasi-soft-sell ways to get prospects to open up.
Well done Jacques - by Snowboy
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