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Spelling Errors

I have seen even big players in industry sometimes dont double check spellings on there promotional items, i am sure this really sends a bad message to the customers,

whats your view whether the customer really cares for that if he really wants to buy that product or will keep off - by mtajim
If I noticed a mispelling in an advertisement it wouldn't affect my perception of the product or company but if the mispelling was on the packaging it would. - by Marcus
I knew a guy that use to tell me that spelling errors created attention. In some ways I'm sure he was correct. However spelling errors just like how we dress, hygiene issues, our attitude, etc., all create subconscious attention (or impressions) that may have nothing at all to with the product we are trying to sell.

That first impression tends to drive our initial perception of the product. Generally if someone is turned off by an advertisement or a salesman, the product itself becomes so much harder to sell.

For some, a simple spelling error wouldn't be an initial turn-off. For others, it would subconsciously give an impression of laziness, or lack of caring about details. It could be the thing that starts killing the sale before the salesman ever walked in. Why take the chance? There are many more positive ways to attract attention.

Most word processor programs have spell checkers attached to them. Some browsers even do. (Thank you firefox.);wi I am one of those that subconsciously cringes over poor spelling. To me in this day and age of spell checkers there is no excuse for spelling errors when writing something important.

Pam

(Yes I occasionally make spelling errors....I cringe at my own mistakes too.):un - by LadySmith
I write ads for every home I list and I'm very conscious about mistakes. Mistakes happen but not very often because I'm always checking my work. - by realtor
Thanks for those tips, spelling mistakes does really brings a bad reputataion for companies , if theres a error on product package , then one may think that the product is a duplicate of original - by mtajim
Or.....you could just test.

Send out 50% with no errors and 50% with spelling errors and see which one gets the bigger result.

The results will interest you. - by helisell
The internet lives with horrible spelling. I attended a seminar and they presented each person a book with tips. In this book it used the word jewelry and had tracking that provided information with that word misspelled. They had a higher percentage of people who misspelled the word purchase the product.Whether or not it is true I have no idea nor do I care.

I have listened to many trainers who have made this statement if a client makes up a word you the sales person should use that word.
With advertising I do believe that many do misspell on purpose. That typically would be the advertisement that is remembered. Before thinking it is a mistake due to being a professional you might want to rethink it is a strategy or marketing aha moment.

- by rich34232
The internet lives with horrible spelling. I attended a seminar and they presented each person a book with tips. In this book it used the word jewelry and had tracking that provided information with that word misspelled. They had a higher percentage of people who misspelled the word purchase the product.Whether or not it is true I have no idea nor do I care.

I have listened to many trainers who have made this statement if a client makes up a word you the sales person should use that word.
With advertising I do believe that many do misspell on purpose. That typically would be the advertisement that is remembered. Before thinking it is a mistake due to being a professional you might want to rethink it is a strategy or marketing aha moment.
We have had a lot of trainers aboard SalesPractice and I have never heard or read the advice you say "many" trainers have offered concerning using a "client" made up word. Could you quote specific sources for your statement so that other members can discern it?

Also can you point us to any "advertising" that misspells on purpose? I'm not referring to branding such as Toys R Us--but advertising as you claimed. - by Gary A Boye
why must I prove everything I say to you? I can give you names - by rich34232
why must I prove everything I say to you? I can give you names
Excellent question, Rich.

The site developers are hell bent on living up to the mission of being The Definitive Source of Sales Education on the Internet. They also realize that many newcomers who are novices in selling don't have the knowledge and experience yet to discern the information they see posted here. So some of them use as a guide for evaluating the source of the material the self-created profiles of the members---in your case, "advanced". If they were to take the information at face value and the information was not founded on facts, it would be a disservice by SalesPractice. Now in your particular place where you have offered information on the forum on advertising, I felt obliged to ask for the source having personally studied advertising for several years.

We know that some forums on the Internet are not as sensitive to the quality of information posted. But we try to be. Keep in mind we are dealing with people's careers here, and we want to provide the best information we can.

If you can't provide the source for the information you post we wouldn't want to think that you are simply making up this information.

Hope that helps. - by Gary A Boye
"If you can't provide the source for the information you post we wouldn't want to think that you are simply making up this information."

This insinuates that I am lying. Not going to happen. I do not have the time or inclination to answer questions if this is the reason. The internet allows the possibility to discover this information on your own.

Tec Daddy who has 4 day seminar training for advanced and beginner and a boot camp for the trade’s .He also writes for several trade magazines and a service round table. In his articles you will find the word" irrelevant" People talk to this fellow at trade shows, seminars and call him by name. They remember him for using the word irrelevant and that is a made up word. With the invention of the internet for business use I am sure you can dig up more if applied in that direction.

The other is a coo for the largest sales organization for the trades and the fastest growing organization in its niche. They have set up their own training for those who are members of their organization. Each have a dvd set that explains when and where.

Where it is taught; I am sure you have heard of the mirroring technique. This is where the sales professional mirrors or mimics the clients, speech, speech patterns, facial expressions and body language to gain cooperation.

I would suggest not correcting a client when they mispronounce or make up a word. Why win a battle and possibly hinder the sale. This is only logical and polite way to handle this kind of mistake by a client.

As a sales professional I would suggest reading out of your professional network and trade magazines and discover outside trainers and material that are not located in a sales forum site and expand the learning curve. There are many trainers that offer fantastic information outside of sales forum sites due to territorial people in some of these type sites.
Understand I do not make up things and put it out there. I have never done this anywhere and do not have a history of just making things up.

- by rich34232
"Irrelevant" is a made up word by by this seminar guy!!???

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/irrelevant

If you don't have a history of making things up, you are certainly creating that history on this thread. I'll point it out 'til the cows come home for reasons I stated above.

"The mirroring technique" is standard lore in some training and has little to do with purposely using a word that a prospect/client "makes up."

If you don't want to post information on these threads that can be referenced to a source, or don't want to provide examples for some "unusual information", I would hope that you will understand in the future why you will be asked for examples and sources.

Opinions are one thing--they vary and are welcome. But misinformation, unsubstantiated, does not belong here without being readily challenged. - by Gary A Boye
The internet allows the possibility to discover this information on your own.[/size]
Rich, this IS the Internet the last time I looked.

The beauty of the part of the Internet we call forums is that it gives a person the ability to ask for the source of the information provided. The author's willingness to provide the sources I dare say would reflect on the reliability of the information. At least it darn well should.

"Consider the source" is a tenet of learning. It was before the Internet existed, and it will continue to be. - by Gary A Boye
I don't know or care what anyone else thinks or whatever the outcome will be, I spell check, organize paragraphs, and spend a few minutes over word choice every time I communicate in writing.

The fact that other people are lazy, ignorant, careless or apathetic toward these things and the fact that doing my best writing may or may not be something the customer cares about is not relevant to me.

Quality is in the mind of the beholder.

The best of success to you.

MitchM - by MitchM
I've seen some incredibly successful businesses use promotional materials with misspellings. It drives someone like me crazy (former college English teacher), but in the end I'm not sure that it really matters a whole lot. Language is a fluid thing, and the codification of spelling and grammar is actually a relatively recent phenomenon in the English language.

I highly recommend carefully proofreading everything you put out there--emails, marketing materials, press releases, etc. Just because there are people like me out there, who wouldn't buy a product from a company that can't spell. - by salesandsales
I highly recommend carefully proofreading everything you put out there--emails, marketing materials, press releases, etc..
I agree.

Proofing is a difficult task. Recently I wrote an eight page promotional document, and I still found errors after four proof readings. I believe the reason for that is we do not read word by word. Instead, our eyes take in groups of words that register on the brain. But you can't do that when you proof read. You will still miss errors if you do. - by Gary A Boye
In general spelling errors are not acceptable. I personally would never use spelling errors to get any kind of benefit for myself or client. If it happens it is bound to make a bad impression- thatís my firm belief.

But there is an area on internet where spelling errors are not just acceptable but desired and can be profitable. That area is pay-per-click advertising.

People make mistakes. Search engines do not correct these mistakes but take notice of the mistakes. People that bid in Adwords can and should bid on spelling errors. - by SEOmarketing
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