Upselling

Does anyone have any great "Upselling Techniques" they would like to pass along? :D - by Newbie
What do you mean when you say, "Technique"? :confused: - by SalesGal
It's important always that your strategy precedes your technique (tactic). Please tell us more about what specifically you want to accomplish. - by Gary Boye
IMO, "Upselling" and "Cross Selling" go hand in hand.

Upselling - encouraging customers to add to their original purchase with a value-added incentive.
Example A: "Buy one pair of shoes and get the second pair half off."
Example B: "Supersize your fries for an additional twenty five cents."

Cross Selling - encouraging customers to purchase additional products, that may or may not relate to the original purchase, with or without a value-added incentive.
Example A: "In addition to the shirt, would you like a matching tie?" [modified example]
Example B: "Would you like to buy a memory card for your new digital camera?" - by Jolly Roger
So using your example JR, when I'm at McDonald's and the clerk ask if I would like an ice cream sunday with my meal that's "Cross Selling" and when the clerk asks if I would like to Supersize my order that's "Upselling"? - by Newbie
Example B: "Would you like to buy a memory card for your new digital camera?"
Yes, of the four examples that Jolly Roger provides, that would be "upselling", I suppose. The others are examples of value-added merchandising.
I don't like the term "upselling". I'm an advocate of "complete" selling and it's not a semantics issue. There is a difference. In the example of the memory card, uncovering a need by asking the question leads to complete selling--or from the customer's standpoint, completing a satisfactory purchase. It serves the customer by, among other things, saving her an additional trip to buy the card. If you put the interests of the customer first, a complete sale is more likely to follow. - by Gary Boye
I don't like the term "upselling". I'm an advocate of "complete" selling and it's not a semantics issue. There is a difference. In the example of the memory card, uncovering a need by asking the question leads to complete selling--or from the customer's standpoint, completing a satisfactory purchase.
Semantically, "Complete" sounds so "finite" or "absolute." :confused: - by Newbie
The others are examples of value-added merchandising.
What do you consider "Cross Selling" to be? - by Jolly Roger
Semantically, "Complete" sounds so "finite" or "absolute." :confused:
Yes, exactly. So does "gaining closure" when it applies to the task at hand. It's not implied here that other opportunities won't follow. Facilitating a complete sale invites futher opportunities as customer needs arise. - by Gary Boye
Thank you for your take on the subject. Interesting stuff. ;) - by Newbie
"What do you consider "Cross Selling" to be?"

Cross selling has been defined as winning a greater share of our clients' wallets. I'll accept that as an adequate description . It's not a term I use in my work, really. However, when I observe the obvious examples around me, I would further say that the process has grown some legs in the direct marketing business, both legitimate and shady. It includes observing the behavior and buying habits of people, compiling mailing list databases, email addresses, etc. Businesses trade information and people are targeted for solicitation. Cookies and spy files are used on the web, of course. Those examples are ones that have made cross selling a controversal subject.
Try buying an Irish Christmas ornament from an advertisement in a magazine and not have your junk mail increase significantly. - by Gary Boye
Technology may change the method, and terminology may change the name, however the nature of Upselling and Cross Selling is unchanging. ;) - by Jolly Roger
Technology may change the method, and terminology may change the name, however the nature of Upselling and Cross Selling is unchanging. ;)
And the nature is....?? I don't follow you. Good..bad..indifferent..what?

Certainly if technology or anything, or anybody, changes a method, its nature could change. For instance if a method were manipulative or deceiving, as some methods are, the nature of the matter would hardly be unchanging. - by Gary Boye
The nature of Upselling and Cross Selling is neither good nor bad. That's the point. Unscrupulous behavior and/or methods won't change that. - by Jolly Roger
Does anyone have any great "Upselling Techniques" they would like to pass along? :D
A technique that can be used in some retail situations is use of a checklist for the customer.

For example, in a paint store, when the customer enters the store and is approached by the salesperson, they could be handed a checklist, detailing all of the items they will need to complete their painting task.

So instead of walking out the door with just a tin of paint and paint brush, the customer also sees on the checklist that they will need a drop sheet, paint brush cleaner, etc etc etc. In this example, the checklist does the cross sell for you. - by Stephen
Very creative idea, Stephen. So simple--yet I'll bet very effective. - by Gary Boye
So instead of walking out the door with just a tin of paint and paint brush, the customer also sees on the checklist that they will need a drop sheet, paint brush cleaner, etc etc etc. In this example, the checklist does the cross sell for you.
I Like It! What a great idea for uncovering a need. ;) - by Jolly Roger
Weekly Updates!
Questions and Answers about Selling
Subscribe to our mailing list to get threads and posts sent to your email address weekly - Free of Charge.