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HELP!!! Cant seem to close

Can anyone out there give me any help.

I am a sales rep for a company where the majority of our clients are motor mechanics. I find that the information I give about our product generally grabs their attention but there is something missing. We are fairly new to the market and our product comes with certifications that most of our competitors cannot offer. Even though the people I approach and talk to are impressed by what we offer im still finding it difficult to close a deal.

Any suggestions as to what i might be doing wrong or how i could improve?

Thank you in advance. - by United
What is the common objections you are getting? - by msato
Are you introducing a new product-line to current clients or cold calling to potential clients? - by Calvin
What is the common objections you are getting?

The most common would be "I have never heard of your product name and either have my customers". 85% of the people that I approach agree that the product is better then what their currently using but are turned off by the fact that it doesnt carry a well known name. From what i gather from speaking to people they are either after a dirt cheap product or a product that sells by name. - by United
Are you introducing a new product-line to current clients or cold calling to potential clients?
Cold calling to potential clients. - by United
What is the advantage to the buyer for using your product instead of the well-known product? What is your competitive advantage? - by Houston
The most common would be "I have never heard of your product name and either have my customers". 85% of the people that I approach agree that the product is better then what their currently using but are turned off by the fact that it doesn't carry a well known name. From what i gather from speaking to people they are either after a dirt cheap product or a product that sells by name.
With a little research, I'm sure you could find a couple of popular products that were new to the marketplace in the past couple of years. You can use that to diffuse the "never heard of it" line. In other words, prior to a few years ago, "you never heard of that either" and now you love it. It also helps to ask some leading questions that can be answered by your product of service. When you close out your conversation, summarize the fact that they themselves told you your product was better. Finally, don't forget to ask for the order! - by TommyMac5
The most common would be "I have never heard of your product name and either have my customers".
It sounds like you didn't build enough rapport/trust with your prospects. It's better to have prospects contact you. Do you get any leads from your website, referrals, and other marketing efforts? - by msato
Cold calling to potential clients.
If you're prospecting then you can write up a prospecting offer to run against your prospecting list. Whoever says they want something like what you're offering should be receptive to the sales interview which will give you the chance to ask your questions (SPIN, etc.) which will help the both of you see if there is a reason for doing business together. - by Calvin
With a little research, I'm sure you could find a couple of popular products that were new to the marketplace in the past couple of years. You can use that to diffuse the "never heard of it" line. In other words, prior to a few years ago, "you never heard of that either" and now you love it. It also helps to ask some leading questions that can be answered by your product of service. When you close out your conversation, summarize the fact that they themselves told you your product was better. Finally, don't forget to ask for the order!
Fantastic suggestion guys. I should point out that the product I provide is then passed onto their customers who generally have no knowledge of the technical benifits and feel safe in using a "named" product. Although I am more then happy to provide them with literiture that they can then pass onto their customers they would often rather not have to go through the "effort". I put forward to them they they can use our product as a second option of sale that they can sell for a higher price and in return earn a higher profit for the exact same amount of work. They generally like the idea but still no orders - by United
United
If 85% of your customers are coming up with the same objection I'd be inclined to handle it before it comes up. In other words in your pitch / presentation acknowledge that it is brand new and unique and has USP's which are x,y and z. this then does 3 things; firstly it adds value; secondly it stops you getting the objection and thirdly it gives your customer the words to use when they sell it to their customers.

Hope this helps - by marky
United

What’s the benefit or advantage for your customers to use your product?
What problem do you solve or what opportunity do you help them to exploit?

Snowman - by Tony Dunne
Thank you all for your input and suggestions. I will put them all into practice and keep you updated on my progress. - by United
Can anyone out there give me any help.

I am a sales rep for a company where the majority of our clients are motor mechanics. I find that the information I give about our product generally grabs their attention but there is something missing. We are fairly new to the market and our product comes with certifications that most of our competitors cannot offer. Even though the people I approach and talk to are impressed by what we offer im still finding it difficult to close a deal.

Any suggestions as to what i might be doing wrong or how i could improve?

Thank you in advance.
i think you may be showing your product and solution before asking ALL the required questions first. There is a process to follow.

Steve - by stevehilliar
Do you sit down with prospects to calculate the cost of living without your solution? I've found that when prospects see the numbers on paper, they start thinking differently. hey don't agonise over your price but agonise over the cost of the problem.

part of my diagnosis with committed prospects is to calculate the expected ROI. It's pretty effective. - by Bald Dog
sounds like your pitch needs development.
take an interest in your clients business, show him how your service is going to better his business, keep it personal, remember your helping him... read in to consultative selling.... good luck - by salesman
sounds like your pitch needs development.
Of course it needs improvement. Plenty of it.

Now I give you a bit more context, which I initially neglected. By the time I meet prospects in-person, my automated system has qualified the living daylights out of them. I request them to come to the meeting with all their business documents and a $5,000 signed cheque. They also know that if they give me the typical "I have to think it over", I take the cheque for my troubles, and we both go home. Deal is over.

When we meet we do a detailed diagnosis and an expected ROI analysis. I respect people's time and by the time we meet they know I'm not much for small talk, until the prospect becomes a client.

What prospects also find that I become a drastically different person once money exchanges hands and they make a commitment to proceed.

Consultative selling: When I read it years ago it was great. Then I read stuff from Jeff Thull, Jill Konrath and Michael Nick, and decided to unlearn the whole consultative selling stuff. Not because it's wrong. But because for my analytical mind this new number-centred approach works better.

I'm meeting a buyer on the phone next week. I've already got the cheque. if we proceed, I cash it. If he decides to back off, I shred it. But the cheque shows commitment.

It may be the military in me, but I want to meet only prospects who've actually demonstrated commitment not merely talked about it. I know this is not typical. I'm 45 and have only 75 years to go. And I don't to spend most of those 75 years meeting tyre-kickers. So, I've beefed up my marketing and lead disqualification process. - by Bald Dog
One of our clients is a company that sells computerized repair manuals to auto mechanics. They have three big competitors that have almost 85 percent of the market. Our client’s salespeople used to hear all of the same kind of objections. Now, they are eating up market share. Here’s how.

1. They only give appointments to mechanics who are willing to consider a new supplier.
2. They get a commitment from the prospect that they will make a buying decision
during their first meeting.
3. They immediately develop a Relationship of Mutual Trust and Respect (not rapport.)
... a) When the prospect trusts the salesperson, they trust their products.
... b) When they respect the salesperson, they rely on their technical advice.
4. The salesperson and prospect agree and commit to every feature of their products and services.
5. They have a thorough discussion of all of the benefits and detriments, further enhancing trust and eliminating unfulfilled expectations.
6. They do a sum-up of all commitments and the prospect gets to create his/her own close. - by JacquesWerth
3. They immediately develop a Relationship of Mutual Trust and Respect (not rapport.)
Thanks a lot for this baby, Jacques.

Let's re-read the last section on "no rapport please."

I think this rapport stuff that creates a phoney energy in the air and prospects don't know what to make of this salesperson.

But I may be totally wrong as I usually am. - by Bald Dog
thmbp2; Are you able to offer a free trial? Can you give a demonstration? Can you link it up with something that shows its reliability? - by Wonderboy
thmbp2; Are you able to offer a free trial? Can you give a demonstration? Can you link it up with something that shows its reliability?
That seems like a very good and logical idea. However, if they don't thoroughly trust you, they won't trust your demo or any other proof that you show them. - by JacquesWerth
Although I am more then happy to provide them with literature that they can then pass onto their customers they would often rather not have to go through the "effort". I put forward to them they they can use our product as a second option of sale that they can sell for a higher price and in return earn a higher profit for the exact same amount of work. They generally like the idea but still no orders[/quote]

Is it possible that they say "no" to an otherwise good idea because they doubt their ability to sell your product successfully to their customers (and gain the benefits of your product -- higher price/higher profit.)? It sounds like your customers are your sales force, selling to their customers. That's the sale that gets you "orders." If you want them to sell for you, you have to make them confident they can do it -- and handing out literature won't get it done.

ps. Search this site for Jaques Werth and look up "High Probability Selling." It might be really helpful -- especially the qualifying part.
Tom - by tom behr
Thanks a lot for this baby, Jacques.

Let's re-read the last section on "no rapport please."

I think this rapport stuff that creates a phoney energy in the air and prospects don't know what to make of this salesperson.

But I may be totally wrong as I usually am.
Here's the thing, I also sell to mechanics (tools) one of my biggest tools (pun intended) for selling to them is the rapport I have with them.

I get them to think of me as a friend. And as a scrupulosly (sp) honest guy who will treat them fairly. Now this requires that you BE honest and TREAT your customers fairly. But a personal relationship cannot but help your sales.

Guy, product knowledge and belief in your product will get you further than anything else.
pat - by toolguy_35
3. They immediately develop a Relationship of Mutual Trust and Respect (not rapport.)
I started a topic about the meanings of Trust and Respect http://www.salespractice.com/forums/t-7636.html because it comes up alot. What does Respect mean to you Mr. Werth? - by Thomas
use the show and tell method with your sales process. Show them the quality of your products. Let them use their senses to form the ownership exchange.

This may be the time you give them a trial( form of the puppy dog close) show them your service on delivery.Ask to meet with all the technicians one morning to describe the materials you give them.
Personally I do not care for the term offert as it is asking to either accept or reject. What we or I give you and how it will make their job easier. - by rich34232
Can anyone out there give me any help.

I am a sales rep for a company where the majority of our clients are motor mechanics. I find that the information I give about our product generally grabs their attention but there is something missing. We are fairly new to the market and our product comes with certifications that most of our competitors cannot offer. Even though the people I approach and talk to are impressed by what we offer im still finding it difficult to close a deal.

Any suggestions as to what i might be doing wrong or how i could improve?

Thank you in advance.
When the object is an unknown product, major bonuses, discounts and free-bees are essential.

You are also bucking the loyalty created by their present servicing rep who is offering a well known brand name.

When the product does not have the strength alone to break pre-established loyalty, increased service is essential along with bonuses, discounts and free-bees.

As a new product, extended and enhanced guarantees and other warranties must be offered that greatly diminishes those of the competition.

Many companies take tremendous loss when launching something new. That should have been worked into the start-up phase as marketing costs.

Leaving you with insufficient promotional tools is an uphill battle you may reconsider. - by John Voris
John Thanks for bringing this back up. I sure hope in the past 3 years this fellow has found a way.
I am sorry I had my sales person hat on when I first responded to this query. I have put my tradesmen hat on and now can give anyone that is experiencing the difficulties with tools.
Why do I purchase tools and what are my expectations with that tool.
1. Ease to return the tool no matter how I misuse the tool. Using a screwdriver as a chisel or pry bar and break the tip and have no questions asked of me.
2. Will the company still be there when I do number 1.
3. Quality of the tool
4. Past history with a tool manufacturer knowing their warranty
5. How easy is this tool to handle?
6. How much?
7. Traveling tool guy how often will I see you. I break a tool I need it replaced now.
8. How much maintenance will I need to do to keep this tool in the best shape?

Understand how your clients purchase and the issues dissolve.

- by rich34232
How would you feel about a 'trial-use'? desperate perhaps? I dont know about your product, if it would allow for it.
With my prospects I offer a one week free trial, often this helps. They dont want me to take it away after the week is up. - by RyanC
How would you feel about a 'trial-use'? desperate perhaps? I dont know about your product, if it would allow for it.
With my prospects I offer a one week free trial, often this helps. They dont want me to take it away after the week is up.

This is a good approach that can be said with confidence:

"Sure, I understand you are hesitant, which is why ABC company is willing to make a "trail-offer." Although this is costly for us, we are confident you will experience the difference and switch to us.

Also, keep in mind, that once you do climb on board, this is an introductory offer. As demand increases, so will the cost and you will have gotten in on the ground floor.

Just a few additional thoughts. - by John Voris
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