Home > Resistance > We're not interested objection

We're not interested objection

Yikes, now what?

Do you push forward or turn around and walk out? :confused: - by Newbie
Are you encountering this resistance up front, in the middle or at the end of the presentation? There is a difference! - by WobblyBox
Are you encountering this resistance up front, in the middle or at the end of the presentation? There is a difference!
Wobbly is right. Timing can help indicate which type of resistance you're encountering. For example, if you get this response up front it's possible that you didn't capture the prospects attention and/or interest. If you get this response after delivering a presentation it could be considered a bona fide objection. - by Jolly Roger
Thanks Guys! :) - by Newbie
I'm not interested in the concepts of objection and resistance. I took an interest in these things for many years - really decades of my life and not only in sales. Then one day I decided to erase the concepts from my mind and replace them with something more relaxing and productive.

I replaced them with the concepts of want or not want. This really simplified my life. Some will say this is too black and white and I will say that I agree that in less than 1% of the time there is a little more to it than want or not want.

BUT in the other 99% of the time want or not want will suffice and so when someone doesn't want what I offer I stroll on - that's what I do.

The best of the best to everyone.

MitchM - by MitchM
Some will say this is too black and white and I will say that I agree that in less than 1% of the time there is a little more to it than want or not want.

BUT in the other 99% of the time want or not want will suffice and so when someone doesn't want what I offer I stroll on - that's what I do.

The best of the best to everyone.

MitchM
MitchM how often would you say that a potential buyer doesn't understand what is being offered and in response fires off the objection of "not interested"? - by Jolly Roger
I wouldn't know - how would I know. But what's the point?

MitchM - by MitchM
MitchM how often would you say that a potential buyer doesn't understand what is being offered and in response fires off the objection of "not interested"?
That's a great question! I would be willing to bet that a high number of the "I'm not interested" objections we get are simply due to the fact the prospect not fully understanding what we are selling.

When I get the "I'm not interested" objection, my first response to the prospect is "exactly what are you not interested in" or "I understand, would you mind if I asked what you are not particulary interested in". Not suprisingly, their responses either confirm that I did not do my due dilligence and help them understand my offering or they have another objection such as "price" which I need to address. - by robhalv1
I used to ask that question too. Over time I realized I was slowing myself down and also producing resistance - not what I expected I was doing at all.

When I eliminated that question resistance went away and my sales increased. When I told my sales team to do the same those who did what I told them to do also began to become more successful and those who didn't didn't.

If someone can be successful asking that question then he should use it.

MitchM - by MitchM
I used to ask that question too. Over time I realized I was slowing myself down and also producing resistance - not what I expected I was doing at all.

When I eliminated that question resistance went away and my sales increased. When I told my sales team to do the same those who did what I told them to do also began to become more successful and those who didn't didn't.

If someone can be successful asking that question then he should use it.

MitchM
I think it comes down to how it is delivered to the prospect. I rarely get resistance when I am honest with the prospect and show a true interest in understanding their needs.

The problem with not asking the question is that you are accepting defeat without really understanding "why the prospect is not interested". Asking the question does not only open the door for more opportunity with the prospect but could also help you understand potential problems with your products or services based on the prospects perception.

Regardless, your statement "If someone can be successful asking that question then he should use it" was well put! - by robhalv1
The problem with not asking the question is that you are accepting defeat without really understanding "why the prospect is not interested". Asking the question does not only open the door for more opportunity with the prospect but could also help you understand potential problems with your products or services based on the prospects perception.
Excellent, robhalv1! - by Skip Anderson
Nothing beats sincerity - good point.

MitchM - by MitchM
I wouldn't know - how would I know. But what's the point?

MitchM
The potential for miscommunication is so high that I question whether "clear communication" is really the exception and not the rule. The potential for a knee jerk response [we're not interested] to limited information is also high (click-whirr). Factor in the cost of lead generation and a salesman's choice to disqualify without verifying clear communication starts to look a lot like 'waste'. - by Jolly Roger
I just don't spend much time trying to get clear if the person I'm talking with says NO WANT. Maybe other people are successful other ways - I'm no stranger to poor communication - I understand it all.

MitchM - by MitchM
The potential for miscommunication is so high that I question whether "clear communication" is really the exception and not the rule. The potential for a knee jerk response [we're not interested] to limited information is also high (click-whirr). Factor in the cost of lead generation and a salesman's choice to disqualify without verifying clear communication starts to look a lot like 'waste'.
Agreed. msnwnk; - by AZBroker
The potential for miscommunication is so high that I question whether "clear communication" is really the exception and not the rule. The potential for a knee jerk response [we're not interested] to limited information is also high (click-whirr). Factor in the cost of lead generation and a salesman's choice to disqualify without verifying clear communication starts to look a lot like 'waste'.
Well said, Jolly. - by Skip Anderson
I just don't spend much time trying to get clear if the person I'm talking with says NO WANT. Maybe other people are successful other ways - I'm no stranger to poor communication - I understand it all.
A point to remember, even when a sales professional finds a prospect who WANTS what is being offered that doesn't mean the prospect is going to buy now or ever. Along a similar vein when a prospect says NO WANT that doesn't mean the prospect isn't going to buy now or ever. - by Jolly Roger
I know - that's a simple one to understand.

When I hear I WANT we talk and it usually ends up being a sale - not always. When I hear I DON'T WANT I spend little time if any looking for a way to turn that statement into a I WANT.

The last sale I made was to a guy who two months earlier said he wanted a weight loss product I sell but in the conversation I heard some hesitation about using it properly - he admitted to having problems sticking to weight loss systems in the past - so I passed on the sale and told him to let me know when he was serious.

A couple of weeks later he told me he "thought" he was serious and after a little conversation I told him to keep thinking about it.

A couple of weeks ago he got started and he agreed to my follow-up procedure just as I had agreed to his conditions of satisfation - it was a mutual decision.

He still may or may not stick with it long enough to lose 100 pounds - but what I did wasn't any sales tactic. I don't do much business when I mistrust the other person's commitment - I'd rather walk away. Sometimes I'm wrong either way - that's how it goes.

I have friends slamming down sales who have huge failure rates afer these highly influenced-by-fire works people get over their rush to judgment and stop using the products within a few weeks or month or so.

I make fewer sales but have a higher than typical rate of reorder and many go back a decade.

That's how I work.

The best of the best to everyone.

MitchM - by MitchM
I think it comes down to how it is delivered to the prospect. I rarely get resistance when I am honest with the prospect and show a true interest in understanding their needs.

The problem with not asking the question is that you are accepting defeat without really understanding "why the prospect is not interested". Asking the question does not only open the door for more opportunity with the prospect but could also help you understand potential problems with your products or services based on the prospects perception.

Regardless, your statement "If someone can be successful asking that question then he should use it" was well put!
Without knowing the percentage of times asking that question will result in a sale, how well it works is just an opinion.

If you know how to find prospects who want what you have to offer, you won't waste time on disinterested prospects. You won't even spend time with interested prospects that are not ready, willing and able to buy.

Disqualifying a disinterested prospect is not ”accepting a defeat." It is a superior strategy that can maximize your closing rates. - by JacquesWerth
Disqualifying a disinterested prospect is not ”accepting a defeat." It is a superior strategy that can maximize your closing rates.
You are assuming this prospect is disinterested without asking questions or qualifying them further. Walking away from business without doing your due diligence is not a "superior strategy."

I can assure that at least 80% of my clients told me they were not interested at some point, yet today they are happy clients! - by robhalv1
You are assuming this prospect is disinterested without asking questions or qualifying them further. Walking away from business without doing your due diligence is not a "superior strategy."
Robhalv1, I strongly with your statement that assuming a prospect is disinterested without asking questions or qualifying them further is a mistake and is, indeed, not doing due diligence. - by Skip Anderson
You are assuming this prospect is disinterested without asking questions or qualifying them further. Walking away from business without doing your due diligence is not a "superior strategy."

I can assure that at least 80% of my clients told me they were not interested at some point, yet today they are happy clients!
I am not assuming anything.
The topic of this thread is how to deal with prospects who say, "We're Not Interested." Since you forgot that, I won't jump all over your "due diligence" remark.

However, your 80% statistic is meaningless.
A meaningful statistic would be the percentage of all of the disinterested prospects that you spent time trying to sell that actually became your happy clients. - by JacquesWerth
I am not assuming anything.
The topic of this thread is how to deal with prospects who say, "We're Not Interested." Since you forgot that, I won't jump all over your "due diligence" remark.

However, your 80% statistic is meaningless.
A meaningful statistic would be the percentage of all of the disinterested prospects that you spent time trying to sell that actually became your happy clients.
JacquesWerth,

There is nothing in my post that is irrelevant to the topic "We're Not Interested" and your statment "Since you forgot that" is.

The 80% statistic I provided earlier was the perecentage of all of the disinterested prospects that I spent time trying to sell that actually became my happy clients. So I guess it was a meaningful statistic afterall.

I believe in doing everything possible to make sure the prospect fully undersatnds what I am offering and how it will benefit them before walking away. There have been many times that I or one of my sales reps has used your philosophy and walked away from a prospect because they said "they were not interested" later to find that they bought from a competitor. Obviously, the competitor did a better job by asking "why are you not interested?" - by robhalv1
There have been many times that I or one of my sales reps has used your philosophy and walked away from a prospect because they said "they were not interested" later to find that they bought from a competitor. Obviously, the competitor did a better job by asking "why are you not interested?"
You've got a point there. ;wi - by Houston
JacquesWerth,

The 80% statistic I provided earlier was the perecentage of all of the disinterested prospects that I spent time trying to sell that actually became my happy clients. So I guess it was a meaningful statistic afterall.
That is both fantastic and incredible.
I have gone out on sales calls with hundreds of the top one percent of salespeople in 23 industries. These are people who are earning between 1/2 and 3 million dollars per year. Yet, none of them were able, or even attempted, to do what you can do.

Our company has trained thousands of salespeople. Those that are earning over $200,000/year are typically closing between 80 and 90 percent of their prospects. However, none of them meets with disinterested prospects. All of the prospects they meet with are not only "interested," they are also ready, willing and able to buy. That is what we teach them how to do. - by JacquesWerth
That is both fantastic and incredible.
I have gone out on sales calls with hundreds of the top one percent of salespeople in 23 industries. These are people who are earning between 1/2 and 3 million dollars per year. Yet, none of them were able, or even attempted, to do what you can do.

Our company has trained thousands of salespeople. Those that are earning over $200,000/year are typically closing between 80 and 90 percent of their prospects. However, none of them meets with disinterested prospects. All of the prospects they meet with are not only "interested," they are also ready, willing and able to buy. That is what we teach them how to do.
Then I guess it won't surprise you that my compensation is comparable.

Please do not misunderstand me and think I am chasing "disinterested prospects." Almost 100% of my business comes from referrals and even referrals do not fully understand how my solution can benefit their business until I have had an opportunity to fully educate them. It is not uncommon for a prospect to make the "We're Not Interetsed" statement without completely understanding what my company offers.

I agree with you 100% that prospecting intelligently is the key to success. However, going that extra step to try and understand what a prospect is saying when they make the "We're Not Interested" statement is the difference between being an average producer versus a top producer. - by robhalv1
I would suggest that an emotional hot button or pain for the buyer was not uncovered and conveyed. Chances are they didn't have an interest because they didn't feel like there was anything for them (individually) to gain. - by rogerbauer
I would suggest that an emotional hot button or pain for the buyer was not uncovered and conveyed. Chances are they didn't have an interest because they didn't feel like there was anything for them (individually) to gain.
Hi to all. I'm new here and will drop by occasionally.

I agree with the guys who stress the importance of qualifying the prospect to the point where "I'm not interested" never comes into the picture. Unless you're in the business of accepting unqualified leads or you're cold calling, why would you want to be in front of someone who hasn't exhibited some level of interest in what you're offering?

I know a guy whose comeback to that line was always an extreme quizzical look on his face and the question, "Then why did you invite me here?"

You can't believe how that response can impact a prospect. It would place them on the defensive and they quite often then gave him something he could grab onto.

One sequence I know about: (P) Prospect; (S) Salesperson

P: I'm not interested
S: Then why did you invite me here?

P: What do you mean?
S: George, I'm confused. We briefly talked about (product) and you said you've been considering it off and on for months. What changed in the last five days to wipe out your interest?

At that point George has to come up with something. It might be baloney or could be real...but he has to respond.

P: Look, I checked into the replacement cycle on the unit we now have and I realized that I made a mistake. I thought it was due for changing out this year. It's actually not for another 18 months. I'm sorry I brought you out here for nothing. Make sure you get back in touch in about a year and I'll see to it that you get a shot at the business.
S: George, it's no problem for me, and thank you for being candid. May I ask how many (units) that current machine is churning out for you and at what monthly cost?

P: 15,000 units at $4.00 even.
S: I know you've got a replacement plan in place, but did you know that I'm now installing brand new machines that can deliver 15,000 units at $3.25 each?

P: $3.25? (grabs calculator)...that's a difference of $11,250 a month...and that's*over $200,000 in savings over that 18-month period. What did you say your machine goes for?
S: $195,000, and that includes installation and training.

P: Have you got some time? I'd like to get my CFO in on this discussion.

The end result was that the savings over that 18 months actually paid for the new machine and my friend got the sale.

Nothing works all the time. The real goal is to get the prospect talking and see where that leads. - by Training
Hi to all. I'm new here and will drop by occasionally.

The real goal is to get the prospect talking and see where that leads.
1. Welcome to SalesPractice, Training. Congrats on your first post!

2. I couldn't agree more with your quote above. Engagement of the prospect is key. Salespeople who engage more sell more. Period.

Skip Anderson - by Skip Anderson
Salespeople that know how to find and meet with prospects that are ready, willing and able to buy, sell a lot more than those who engage "interested" prospects. End of story.

If you don't know how to find and identify high probability prospects, and you don't want to develop that skill, then your only alternative is to vigorously defend a second rate sales process.
- by JacquesWerth
Salespeople that know how to find and meet with prospects that are ready, willing and able to buy, sell a lot more than those who engage "interested" prospects. End of story.

If you don't know how to find and identify high probability prospects, and you don't want to develop that skill, then your only alternative is to vigorously defend a second rate sales process.
1. Jacques, perhaps you could explain to the community how you go about finding prospects who are "ready, willing, and able to buy" unless you've engaged them.

2. I think your second paragraph is self-serving. I believe that there is a lot to be learned from various sales thinkers, sales trainers, and veteran salespeople other than just Jacques Werth. I don't know if I know of any "second-rate sales processes." But I know of a third-rate one: it's called "high probability selling." End of story.

Skip Anderson - by Skip Anderson
1. Jacques, perhaps you could explain to the community how you go about finding prospects who are "ready, willing, and able to buy" unless you've engaged them.

2. I think your second paragraph is self-serving. I believe that there is a lot to be learned from various sales thinkers, sales trainers, and veteran salespeople other than just Jacques Werth. I don't know if I know of any "second-rate sales processes." But I know of a third-rate one: it's called "high probability selling." End of story.

Skip Anderson
You advocate not to personally attack anyone on this site yet you squeeze your comments in at every opportunity against certain members of this community. What's your deal man?


- by bluenote
Salespeople that know how to find and meet with prospects that are ready, willing and able to buy, sell a lot more than those who engage "interested" prospects. End of story.
"Ready, willing and able" takes more time, and whether you're going to invest that depends upon what you're selling and the length of the cycle. If it's going to take five meetings and six months to place equipment in the six figures, that's one type of prospecting. With the cost of a selling encounter steadily rising, I'd indeed want the salesperson to do some advance work in order to know the best way to approach an organization, and to know the factors that influence the likelihood of a buy.

If you're looking to sell life insurance to a young family, it's different. "Interested" is probably good enough, so long as my qualifying questions have determined the need, whether husband and wife are in accord for the purchase, and if they're financially ready to move forward.

But then, "interested" really morphs into "ready, willing and able," doesn't it?

There's a fine line at work here, and maybe the lesson involved is that salespeople should ask more qualifying questions before they ever agree to sit with a prospect. - by Training
1. Jacques, perhaps you could explain to the community how you go about finding prospects who are "ready, willing, and able to buy" unless you've engaged them.

2. I think your second paragraph is self-serving. I believe that there is a lot to be learned from various sales thinkers, sales trainers, and veteran salespeople other than just Jacques Werth. I don't know if I know of any "second-rate sales processes." But I know of a third-rate one: it's called "high probability selling."
Skip Anderson
1. I have described the High Probability Prospecting process in great detail numerous times in these SalesPractice.com forums. If you really want to know, they are easy to find.

2. When you make it clear that you have no understanding of the HPS process, but cast unfounded aspersions at it, you show everyone what you are made of.
- by JacquesWerth
"Ready, willing and able" takes more time, and whether you're going to invest that depends upon what you're selling and the length of the cycle. If it's going to take five meetings and six months to place equipment in the six figures, that's one type of prospecting. With the cost of a selling encounter steadily rising, I'd indeed want the salesperson to do some advance work in order to know the best way to approach an organization, and to know the factors that influence the likelihood of a buy.

If you're looking to sell life insurance to a young family, it's different. "Interested" is probably good enough, so long as my qualifying questions have determined the need, whether husband and wife are in accord for the purchase, and if they're financially ready to move forward.

But then, "interested" really morphs into "ready, willing and able," doesn't it?

There's a fine line at work here, and maybe the lesson involved is that salespeople should ask more qualifying questions before they ever agree to sit with a prospect.
You are right. But, the line is not very “fine.”
Coincidentally, I used to own an insurance agency. Before that I was VP, Sales for a company that built capital equipment for electronics manufacturers. The largest single sale that I closed was for $14 million.

Regardless of the sales situation, it is easy to determine if prospects are ready, willing and able to buy, or not - before you decide to spend your valuable time with them.

If you know can do that, why would you ever make an appointment with someone who is merely interested? - by JacquesWerth
Salespeople that know how to find and meet with prospects that are ready, willing and able to buy, sell a lot more than those who engage "interested" prospects. End of story.

If you don't know how to find and identify high probability prospects, and you don't want to develop that skill, then your only alternative is to vigorously defend a second rate sales process.
Finding and meeting with prospects that are "ready, willing and able to buy" does not eliminate objections (i.e. "We're not interested") caused by a salesperson not doing their due dilligence in the sales process. Even the most qualified prospects still need to be convinced that your product or service will be beneficial to them and/or their company.

Although I appreciate your attempt to promote your product and process I still have to disagree that your solution is a "magic potion" and will guarantee no objections. Telling salespeople to only look for "laydowns" and not do their due dilligence in qualifying and delivering a solution for a potential customer is both impractical and irresponsible. - by robhalv1
1. I have described the High Probability Prospecting process in great detail numerous times in these SalesPractice.com forums. If you really want to know, they are easy to find.

2. When you make it clear that you have no understanding of the HPS process, but cast unfounded aspersions at it, you show everyone what you are made of.
Jacques, what you seem to be missing is that you have no problem calling any system that is non-hps "second rate", yet when someone calls your high probability selling "third rate", you acuse that individual of casting "unfounded aspersions" of your system.

Do you see how that might not appear to be fair? I suggest that you either quit casting stones at others' systems, or accept stones when they're cast back at your system. - by Skip Anderson
Finding and meeting with prospects that are "ready, willing and able to buy" does not eliminate objections (i.e. "We're not interested") caused by a salesperson not doing their due dilligence in the sales process. Even the most qualified prospects still need to be convinced that your product or service will be beneficial to them and/or their company.

Although I appreciate your attempt to promote your product and process I still have to disagree that your solution is a "magic potion" and will guarantee no objections. Telling salespeople to only look for "laydowns" and not do their due dilligence in qualifying and delivering a solution for a potential customer is both impractical and irresponsible.
Can you please provide the source for the quote above that you attributed to Mr. Werth?

If not, are you willing to rescind the word "irresponsible".

It's OK to disagree, but let's play fair. Misquotes to support an accusation of irresponsbility doesn't constitute playing fair. - by Joe Closer
Jacques, what you seem to be missing is that you have no problem calling any system that is non-hps "second rate", yet when someone calls your high probability selling "third rate", you acuse that individual of casting "unfounded aspersions" of your system.

Do you see how that might not appear to be fair? I suggest that you either quit casting stones at others' systems, or accept stones when they're cast back at your system.
Which systems did Mr. Werth apply the words "second rate" to? - by Joe Closer
Can you please provide the source for the quote above that you attributed to Mr. Werth?

If not, are you willing to rescind the word "irresponsible".

It's OK to disagree, but let's play fair. Misquotes to support an accusation of irresponsbility doesn't constitute playing fair.
If you know how to find prospects who want what you have to offer, you won't waste time on disinterested prospects. You won't even spend time with interested prospects that are not ready, willing and able to buy.

- This statement implies that these prospects would have no objections what so ever which is impractical

If you don't know how to find and identify high probability prospects, and you don't want to develop that skill, then your only alternative is to vigorously defend a second rate sales process.

- This statement implies that unless you are only working high probability prospects everything else is second rate. That is irresponsible. I close a lot of business and a large portion of them are not high probability prospects. They are prospects!

Again, I have no argument with the point that working only highly qualified leads makes your life easier. But to imply that it is the only way is wrong. This topic is about dealing with the objection "we're not interested" not "high probability prospecting". - by robhalv1
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