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Selling Decisions and Ethics

If during the discovery phase you recognize that your service isn't the best choice for the prospect sitting across from you what would you do? - by Houston
I would respect the buyer's decision of what is or isn't their best choice. I'm neutral. - by Marcus
I would respect the buyer's decision of what is or isn't their best choice. I'm neutral.
I haven't met many salespeople who after a prospect say "no" pack up their bags and leave. msnwnk; - by Houston
If during the discovery phase you recognize that your service isn't the best choice for the prospect sitting across from you what would you do?
You as the salesperson don't make that decision the prospect does. - by Calvin
You as the salesperson don't make that decision the prospect does.
Then let's change the question a little.

What would you do if you recognized that your product or service either doesn't meet the prospect's needs or if you know your product or service cannot fully meet their expectations? - by pmccord
Then let's change the question a little.

What would you do if you recognized that your product or service either doesn't meet the prospect's needs or if you know your product or service cannot fully meet their expectations?
I would tell the prospect my opinion and leave it at that. If they want to move forward with the purchase after hearing my opinion that is up to them. - by Calvin
Calvin,

Which do you mean by your opinion (how would you phrase it):

"I don't think this will do exactly what you want it to do." or something to that effect.

or

"this won't do what you say you need it to do. It will do X, X and X, but won't do Y or Y."--or "if you really need this to do X, you'll be disappointed because . . . " - by pmccord
This is off the top of my head for illustrative purposes only:

Mr. Prospect, when we were talking about this earlier you said your situation called for a vehicle that got no less than 25/33 mpg. You should know that this vehicle is closer to 15/18 mpg. Is that going to be acceptable? - by Calvin
This is off the top of my head for illustrative purposes only:

Mr. Prospect, when we were talking about this earlier you said your situation called for a vehicle that got no less than 25/33 mpg. You should know that this vehicle is closer to 15/18 mpg. Is that going to be acceptable?
I sell cars i wouldn't quite put it that way (too soft for me)...
I would say i know you really like this suv, but you had pointed out to me earlier that you were looking for a car with 30+ miles to gallon. So lets go inside and put everything on paper and we can look at the pro's and con's of both...... then i would do a ben franklin close..... i would write on one side pros of car then on the other side pros of suv and then ask do you feel like the suv is worth the worse gas mileage if yes then you need to buy the suv if no then the car is best for you.... - by benjamin-benjamin
I really don't see anything wrong with Calvin's approach. I don't sell cars, but I've seen enough car purchases to know that most buyers do the worst thing possible--they fall in love with the car and everything else goes out the window--often including common sense.

If the buyer has fallen in love with the vehicle instead of sticking to what he or she really needs, simply pointing out that the vehicle they're in love with doesn't meet what they had indicated were their needs should be sufficient from both a moral and ethical point of view (unless the salesperson delibertaly set the buyer up to over-purchase, which is a totally different discussion). - by pmccord
I really don't see anything wrong with Calvin's approach. I don't sell cars, but I've seen enough car purchases to know that most buyers do the worst thing possible--they fall in love with the car and everything else goes out the window--often including common sense.

If the buyer has fallen in love with the vehicle instead of sticking to what he or she really needs, simply pointing out that the vehicle they're in love with doesn't meet what they had indicated were their needs should be sufficient from both a moral and ethical point of view (unless the salesperson delibertaly set the buyer up to over-purchase, which is a totally different discussion).
I get paid a flat rate per car, so i have no incentive to talk people into more expensive cars. But people that take calvins approach would not sell very many cars. Sometimes people buy off of emotion, that is a fact. You can't force people into buying what you feel like they want, it just won't happen. I have had over 17 people quit, transfer, or get fired in my office and some of thoses people tried that approach. You have to let people buy what they want. you give them choices.... - by benjamin-benjamin
I don't see where Calvin isn't giving them a choice. He has simply pointed out that the car they indicated they want doesn't meet their initial statment of need. Now, I am assuming that they've looked at their alternatives that do meet their needs. Of course, if they haven't had the opportunity to see what does meet their indicated need, then, again, there would be an issue. - by pmccord
I don't see where Calvin isn't giving them a choice. He has simply pointed out that the car they indicated they want doesn't meet their initial statment of need. Now, I am assuming that they've looked at their alternatives that do meet their needs. Of course, if they haven't had the opportunity to see what does meet their indicated need, then, again, there would be an issue.
not that big of a deal but i am just saying that if you said that 80% of people would say OK we are going to go think about it. You can't take that type of approach in car sales..... - by benjamin-benjamin
I would tell the prospect my opinion and leave it at that. If they want to move forward with the purchase after hearing my opinion that is up to them.
I would do the same and probably go a step further and recommend to the prospect someone that I