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Radio music on hold.

I was recently informed that playing the radio as your on "hold" background music is a copyright violation. Is that right? :confused: - by Calvin
To my knowledge, playing music over a workplace telephone system qualifies as a "public performance" and would require a license [permission]. - by Gilbert
To my knowledge, playing music over a workplace telephone system qualifies as a "public performance" and would require a license [permission].
That is my understanding. I've never heard of anyone being prosectured but that doesn't mean it's okay. ;) - by MagicMan
I was recently informed that playing the radio as your on "hold" background music is a copyright violation. Is that right? :confused:
That is my understanding too. - by SalesGuy
Thanks for the responses. I've been checking and it appears that everybody knew about this but me. :( I learn something new every day. :) - by Calvin
Thanks for the responses. I've been checking and it appears that everybody knew about this but me. :( I learn something new every day. :)
LOL We never stop learning and if you wanna learn alot then stick to this forum;) and stay tuned:) - by Sanddollar
ASCAP, the Society of Composers Authors and Publishers is the single largest user of the federal court system. They jump at the chance to sue anyone that does anything to a radio (like hook up an extra speaker or run a wire to a phone system) other than turn it on.

It is legal to play a radio in your business. But not to pipe it in your PA system. The lastest ruling said a radio could have no more than 2 speakers.

Music on hold should be royaly free and that is easy to find, but most importantly, music on hold should bridge a gap between mini commercials touting the benefits of the company called.

They have to have that phone in their ear waiting for you so sell 'em something.

BIG Mike - by BIG Mike
ASCAP, the Society of Composers Authors and Publishers is the single largest user of the federal court system. They jump at the chance to sue anyone that does anything to a radio (like hook up an extra speaker or run a wire to a phone system) other than turn it on.

It is legal to play a radio in your business. But not to pipe it in your PA system. The lastest ruling said a radio could have no more than 2 speakers.

Music on hold should be royaly free and that is easy to find, but most importantly, music on hold should bridge a gap between mini commercials touting the benefits of the company called.

They have to have that phone in their ear waiting for you so sell 'em something.

BIG Mike
That's great information BIG Mike. Where can royalty free music be found? - by SalesGuy
Royalty free music does not mean free music. Any search of Google for Royalty Free Music will yeald hundreds of places that sell music for one time price, never pay again, ASCAP free.

Since music on hold should only be short snippets (15 seconds at best) you don't have to spring for whole songs. You should be able to get a nice collection for $25-$50 bucks.

If you go with a professional music on hold outfit, they have the music available.

You might also ask a friend with a piano or such to do a few bars of his own music for you, and record it. We did a radio commercial once with banjo music in the background composed and played by the hardware store owner.

BIG Mike - by BIG Mike
We did a radio commercial once with banjo music in the background composed and played by the hardware store owner.

BIG Mike
OK, Big Mike. Any one who can turn a banjo-playing hardware man into an effective promotion has got my ear. I just signed up for your newsletter. :cool: - by RainMaker
Royalty Free music is generally a good start but may still require one licence.

There are generally two type of licences to be paid
- One for the composer (e.g. Performing Rights Licence)
- One for the performer (e.g. Public performance licence)

Genrally royalty free music only covers the Performance. You should check with the royalty free music supplier.

I have written an article in one of our sister publications in the UK. It deals with call centres but would be the same for any telephone system.

I hope this helps

Jonty - by Sales Magazine
As far as I know, fees are paid only to composers in the US. A perfmormance license has been discussed (and pushed hard by Country Star Reba) but never enacted. Currently there are 3 major composer rights groups, ASCAP, BMI and SESAC. Together they suck up almost 10% of radio station gross income. When buying music for telephone systems, you pay the composer directly and do not have to deal with one of the license firms. - by BIG Mike
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