Home > Personal Selling > Does owning the product help you sell?

Does owning the product help you sell?

Some companies want their salespeople to own the product in the belief it'll help sell. Other places settle for you being involved with the product (a cable company I worked for issued me free cable service to get me acquainted).

The pro would be you'll be more knowledgable to service the customer. The con would be that you may be so attached to the product or your workplace, you can lose your objectivity to truly help out the customer.

What are your thoughts? - by Wonderboy
Transfer of emotion: I think owning the product helps if/when you become a believer in the product. - by Mikey
I think owning the product shows that you trust it, which makes the prospect more likely to trust it (and you) too. - by Starlor
Experience using the product will provide you with a depth of understanding that you couldn't have otherwise. This deeper understanding can inspire confidence and help you better relate your offering to the customer's needs. - by Liberty
I know several car salesmen who started to drive a certain brand of vehicle only because there was an unwritten rule at their dealership that you had to drive the brand you sold. Once they became invested mentally and financially in the vehicle they became strong supporters of the product. - by Jolly Roger
personally I don't belive you can sell anything you don't believe to be a good product, otherwise you're only making a pitch, and it's obvious.

Pat - by toolguy_35
All piont are very valid. I agree with the majority in saying that the item is great to own as it does build a liking and understanding of the product.

I agree with Jolly Roger in saying that automotive salesmen often follow the unwritten rule and purchase a vehilce that they sell. I storngly feel this help if and when the customer asks " what car do you drive" that you answer with what ever it be you are trying to sell.

This builds confidence in the customers mind they are buying off someone who feels greatly about the product and not just another salesman trying to rip them off. - by Snowboy
personally I don't belive you can sell anything you don't believe to be a good product, otherwise you're only making a pitch, and it's obvious.

Pat
I hear what you are saying Toolguy but I also think that a good salemen will be able to hide his dislike of a particular item or product in order to make the sale.

Think of those in a Multi franchise or those selling across a wide range. I am sure that not all products they are trying to sell they believe in. - by Snowboy
I hear what you are saying Toolguy but I also think that a good salemen will be able to hide his dislike of a particular item or product in order to make the sale.

Think of those in a Multi franchise or those selling across a wide range. I am sure that not all products they are trying to sell they believe in.
Those are two really good points Keith. I don't like brocholi but if I sold food I wouldn't let that get in the way of helping a customer buy.bgwnk; - by Marcus
Those are two really good points Keith. I don't like brocholi but if I sold food I wouldn't let that get in the way of helping a customer buy.bgwnk;
Thanks Marcus - And I love your analogy there. - by Snowboy
I hear what you are saying Toolguy but I also think that a good salemen will be able to hide his dislike of a particular item or product in order to make the sale.

Think of those in a Multi franchise or those selling across a wide range. I am sure that not all products they are trying to sell they believe in.

I sell a HUGE range of products and when a customer is interested in a product I don't believe in, (we have a line called Motor City, which is in the catalog and is just junk) I steer them to one I do believe in.

If I don't believe in a product in my catalog it's because I believe the customer will not be happy with that purchase and/or it will not do what they want it to do. I go so far as to try to discourage customers from buying a tool they do not need because, in the end, they will not be happy with it and will blame me! (I've had it happen.)

I have found that my customers respect me more for refusing to sell them something that is junk or will not meet their needs and they buy MORE later because they respect my integrity and my judgement.

My business has not grown as fast as some of the dealers who bought in at the same time I did, because I took more time and worked slower in building a customer base. However, several of the dealers who went in about the same time I did, and regarded their customers as sheep to be sheared are out of business now, because their customers do not trust them.

Pat - by toolguy_35
I sell a HUGE range of products and when a customer is interested in a product I don't believe in, (we have a line called Motor City, which is in the catalog and is just junk) I steer them to one I do believe in.

If I don't believe in a product in my catalog it's because I believe the customer will not be happy with that purchase and/or it will not do what they want it to do. I go so far as to try to discourage customers from buying a tool they do not need because, in the end, they will not be happy with it and will blame me! (I've had it happen.)

I have found that my customers respect me more for refusing to sell them something that is junk or will not meet their needs and they buy MORE later because they respect my integrity and my judgement.

My business has not grown as fast as some of the dealers who bought in at the same time I did, because I took more time and worked slower in building a customer base. However, several of the dealers who went in about the same time I did, and regarded their customers as sheep to be sheared are out of business now, because their customers do not trust them.

Pat
Congratulations. You have obviously made the right choices. Are you saying thought that you would let a customer walk if they were set on a product that you were not a believer in?

Cheers - by Snowboy
Congratulations. You have obviously made the right choices. Are you saying thought that you would let a customer walk if they were set on a product that you were not a believer in?

Cheers
Depends, I have sold the product to the customer once or twice with the understanding that if they had a problem they had been warned and were on their own.

In both cases the customer came to me later and said "you were right, I should have listened to you." and then proceeded to buy what I tried to sell them in the first place.

I won't loose a customer over it if they get insistent and beligerent that they just "have to have it" but I do give them fair warning.

Once or twice I have walked away from a deal to keep a customer from making a disastrous choice. In both cases the customer later came to me and again, said thank you.

In the end it's my product knowledge and integrity (if I may be so immodest) my customers have come to trust.

In the tool business especially, it is easy to screw customers over and far too many tool men have over the years so it is imperative that you are honest in this business. The ones who are, last. The ones who aren't, don't.

Pat - by toolguy_35
All good points Pat - Thanks a lot for your input - by Snowboy
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