Great saying

Whoever thought of this one really hit the nail:

"The difference between ordinary and extraordinary is that little extra." - by Wonderboy
"The difference between ordinary and extraordinary is that little extra."
Not bad at all. ;co - by SalesCoach
very good msnwnk; - by Tony Dunne
Yeah I will agree with that one. thmbp2; - by Snowboy
Do what others won't today so you can live like other can't tomorrow...

That reminds me, I have "thank you" notes to write... thmbp2; - by klozer
One of the reasons for the success I've had is doing a lot of analysis myself and with team distributors I work with - your cliches make me think of this.

One thing we've done is take common cliches and try to fill in the words with concrete examples; For example: what is that extra we could apply to become more successful? And: what is it that others won't that we will?

How about this thought:

1. one group of people learns and uses all the cliches, makes them work well in conversation, never really analyses them and five years latter business is relatively the same as it has been.

2. the second group does what I suggest and five years later their success has doubled and doubled again.

Thoughts?

Mitch - by MitchM
One of the reasons for the success I've had is doing a lot of analysis myself and with team distributors I work with - your cliches make me think of this.

One thing we've done is take common cliches and try to fill in the words with concrete examples; For example: what is that extra we could apply to become more successful? And: what is it that others won't that we will?

How about this thought:

1. one group of people learns and uses all the cliches, makes them work well in conversation, never really analyses them and five years latter business is relatively the same as it has been.

2. the second group does what I suggest and five years later their success has doubled and doubled again.

Thoughts?

Mitch
The word "cliche" has a negative connotation. Did you mean to use the word "quote" or did you indeed mean "cliche?" - by Skip Anderson
Call them whatever you want - quotes that have become cliches because of constant use - that's beside the point of the question I asked.

Any substantive thoughts on my post from anyone?

MitchM - by MitchM
Call them whatever you want - quotes that have become cliches because of constant use - that's beside the point of the question I asked.

Any substantive thoughts on my post from anyone?

MitchM
What is a "cliche" to you may not be a cliche to someone else. I don't believe the previous posters to this thread believe that the quotes they contributed are "cliches" even though you may, and I don't think that's "beside the point" of this thread. - by Skip Anderson
Skip - I made a substantive post out of the quotes/cliches the thread started with -"that's beside the point of the question I asked." is what I asked, I didn't belittle any previous poster and you haven't addressed my question or added anything of substance yet.

I've used quotes/cliches myself and called them that - overused quotes become cliches void of meaning eventually OR no one stops to consider what they mean or add content.

My question (with illustrations) asks for content? Does anyone else have any thoughts about this using the two examples I gave. My sense of this forum is that rather than nit pick someone's posts we add substance and content to intelligent sales questions, concerns. I'll try again:

"One thing we've done is take common cliches and try to fill in the words with concrete examples; For example: what is that extra we could apply to become more successful? And: what is it that others won't that we will?

How about this thought:

1. one group of people learns and uses all the cliches, makes them work well in conversation, never really analyses them and five years latter business is relatively the same as it has been.

2. the second group does what I suggest and five years later their success has doubled and doubled again." - MitchM

Thoughts?

MitchM - by MitchM
Maybe I'm not making it clear or no one wants to follow this thought. Wonderboy started what could be an instructive thread using a common saying or cliche in selling: "The difference between ordinary and extraordinary is that little extra." Klozer added another:"Do what others won't today so you can live like other can't tomorrow..." I'll add another cliche I've heard and said: "Plan your work and work your plan."

One of the reasons I come onto this forum is to learn something I haven't considered, get a new idea, and pass on some of mine. That's the reason for my question: "What extra could we apply that would take us from the ordinary to the extraordinary?"

We could do that with any common selling or motivational cliche, any idiom of the profession. Here's a situation:

1. one group of people learns and uses all the cliches, makes them work well in conversation, never really analyses them and five years latter business is relatively the same as it has been.

2. the second group does analyzes the cliches, fills them in with concrete and specific content, and five years later their success has doubled and doubled again. They've gone from ordinary to extraordinary.

Assuming everyone here wants to be in that extraordinary number, what specifics would you fill in the cliches - the motivational quotes - to make them come alive AND really give content to the meaning?

Any thoughts?

MitchM - by MitchM
Plan your work and work your plan... implies forethought (planning) which is important in my opinion because it gives you direction. Working the plan implies sticking to the plan which is important in my opinion because it helps you focus your efforts and keep on track. - by Mikey
That's the idea, Mikey - you just gave a cliche some content. Excellent!

"Plan your work and work your plan... implies forethought (planning) which is important in my opinion because it gives you direction. Working the plan implies sticking to the plan which is important in my opinion because it helps you focus your efforts and keep on track." -- Mikey

Forethought about what? What is it that we need to consider in our planning? One thing is who or what is our target market and what makes them that? From that content comes the analysis of identifying our target market.

(Someone might post how they do that.)

Working the plan implies that there is one. What's the plan once a target market has been identified? One example would be making three hours of cold calling daily. Obviously there are others. (What else?)

SO if I can identify a market for what I offer and consistently for the next 90 days cold call people in that market I'm: planning my work and working my plan.

That's a fairly elementary but common-to-all-of-us illustration.

Someone might use some other illustrations for the same quotation I used or use another one or as Wonderboy implied, add one of their own and explicate it for all of us.

MitchM - by MitchM
I don't believe this was meant to be a thread on "one-liners, zingers, or cliches", or how they might be worked into "conversation", or any other superfluous "analysis" for that matter. - by klozer
Ya got me, Klozer. That's what I git for trying to make a dialogue out of this thread! I'd hate to be accused of being superfluous. Ma bad!

Some will, some won't, so what, who's next!

MitchM - by MitchM
Its just that the word "Cliche", Mitch, doesn't exactly inspire much dialogue, or analysis, if you know what I mean:

1. a trite, stereotyped expression; a sentence or phrase, usually expressing a popular or common thought or idea, that has lost originality, ingenuity, and impact by long overuse.

I was just hoping for a motivating thread where others would share expressions that help to motivate them. Any blurb that helps you stay on target, overused or not, is welcome.

And some things are simply best taken at face value...

That being said, what you said did make me think, if only for a moment, despite the loaded questions. cl2; - by klozer
My questions are always genuine to my intent for clarification - they may sound disingenuous or simple minded to some - maybe they are to some - but not me.

I use the word "cliche" a lot referencing quotations, idioms, sayings including my own to depreciate the usage to open them up to analysis - I think there's merit there.

Whatever the intention is of this thread I'm not sure - it began with a common vernacular that has become in my mind a cliche.

The best to you - I get your point - Klozer.

MitchM - by MitchM
Weekly Updates!
Questions and Answers about Selling
Subscribe to our mailing list to get threads and posts sent to your email address weekly - Free of Charge.