Home > Personal Selling > When am I being too pushy!

When am I being too pushy!

hi all,

Well I m in manufacturing in silver jewelry industry! there are customers I called on & had a face to face meeting, they ordered samples, which we sipped timely! and then things just never turned into real orders. I mailed them once, called once.. they just say " we re looking into it, we keep you in mind!". They never expressed any objections that I could handle!
Will I be called too pushy if I call them a number of times and email too often? or is the persistence gonna end up into them trying us out finally?
same problem with 4-5 of our customers! - by a4khatri
Calling back repeatedly to ask for an order would be pushy in my book. It looks like the sales cycle is stalled or broken down in some area. The prospects didn't order a sample as a way to get rid of you did they? - by AZBroker
hi all,

Well I m in manufacturing in silver jewelry industry! there are customers I called on & had a face to face meeting, they ordered samples, which we sipped timely! and then things just never turned into real orders. I mailed them once, called once.. they just say " we re looking into it, we keep you in mind!". They never expressed any objections that I could handle!
Will I be called too pushy if I call them a number of times and email too often? or is the persistence gonna end up into them trying us out finally?
same problem with 4-5 of our customers!
The second time you can say you want to make sure your prospect has been contacted (even when you're asked to call back, it's often an excuse to avoid committment or decision making). You can experiment for more, but you may be pushing it. - by Wonderboy
Well, I'd assume that they just want to get rid of me or avoid decision making. Now what could be my next proactive step... to get a lead.
Instead of asking 4 an order now.. could I call and probe more into their situation.. and try clear the objection which might have stalled the sales cycle before(if thats not too pushy)? Or may be wait for a few months with these customers and try again later hoping that they'll think of giving me another chance then? - by a4khatri
Well I m in manufacturing in silver jewelry industry! there are customers I called on & had a face to face meeting, they ordered samples, which we sipped timely! and then things just never turned into real orders. I mailed them once, called once.. they just say " we re looking into it, we keep you in mind!". They never expressed any objections that I could handle!
What happens during your calls? Do you qualify/disqualify the prospects? - by Jolly Roger
call them back and just say "I don't mean to be pushy......" and continue with your pitch. Not familiar with your industry, but you have to understand these people are obviously not waiting by the phone for your call. You will interrupt them, they will not be ready to buy off the first call and they will keep putting you off until you uncover a need or create value to them of your product. Keep pushing and don't take no for an answer.

I have this same problem. People tell me I'm too pushy on the phone with my customers. But here is the thing, a contact is a contact. This may be the last time you EVER talk to these people. People just hate to be sold, so they will screen your caller id number and never answer again. So you HAVE to get your foot in the door.

Another approach is to build as much rapport with them as possible until they are your best friend. Then slip in the "by the way...."

hope this helps! - by loanwrestler
What happens during your calls? Do you qualify/disqualify the prospects?
Well, This is exactly what happens -
one says on the samples "everything looks good We might be able to finalize by sometime in August"
Another "I am out of country till the end of July we'll contact when we get back"
third one "We re in the process of deciding it, we'll get back to you!"
fourth one "Your work is great, we'll definitely work with you but we dont have anything for you now."

Similar to all manufacturer to reseller situations, there is always a more collabertaive relationship that exists. They are probably resistant to switch from current suppliers. I feel there might be a need to get their confidence, yet not be too pushy! They just keep postponing it, never come to decide! need to sizzle the deal! - by a4khatri
Well, This is exactly what happens -
one says on the samples "everything looks good We might be able to finalize by sometime in August"
Another "I am out of country till the end of July we'll contact when we get back"
third one "We re in the process of deciding it, we'll get back to you!"
fourth one "Your work is great, we'll definitely work with you but we dont have anything for you now."

Similar to all manufacturer to reseller situations, there is always a more collabertaive relationship that exists. They are probably resistant to switch from current suppliers. I feel there might be a need to get their confidence, yet not be too pushy! They just keep postponing it, never come to decide! need to sizzle the deal!
Just try to work on your presentation to get a decision. - by Wonderboy
Just try to work on your presentation to get a decision.
hi all,

Well I m in manufacturing in silver jewelry industry! there are customers I called on & had a face to face meeting, they ordered samples, which we sipped timely! and then things just never turned into real orders. I mailed them once, called once.. they just say " we re looking into it, we keep you in mind!". They never expressed any objections that I could handle!
Will I be called too pushy if I call them a number of times and email too often? or is the persistence gonna end up into them trying us out finally?
same problem with 4-5 of our customers!


Follow up in a systematic method.

Make gentle yet purposeful closing statement/questions.

Have/create a reason for a follow up.

Have patience.

Move forward and upward with your circle of influence thmbp2; - by job ready strategist
What happens during your calls? Do you qualify/disqualify the prospects?
That's what I would want to know. Do these prospects have the want, authority, budget and urgency to buy. ;wi - by Liberty
Follow up in a systematic method.

Make gentle yet purposeful closing statement/questions.

Have/create a reason for a follow up.

Have patience.

Move forward and upward with your circle of influence thmbp2;
Thanks... great! Now i'll figure out how i'll go ahead with this! - by a4khatri
That's what I would want to know. Do these prospects have the want, authority, budget and urgency to buy. ;wi
Want - definitely.. I saw their product line and they approved of our samples(which in most cases was same as what they asked us to make!);co.

Budget - yeah sure, they r resellers this is their main business & never expressed the price was high on samples!

Authority - yeah I am dealing with the owner or the main decision maker.

Urgency - this is what I am not sure... b'coz I guess they could be happy buying from their current suppliers...! Which s understandable b'coz the popular notion is to establish a relationship with current supplier! Now we gotta get our foot in this situation:cu!!!!! - by a4khatri
a4khatri,

You have several options.

First, simply calling once or twice isn't pushy--and isn't enough. Continual communication will help you build a relationship with the prospect. Now, calling 7 or 8 times in a month is not going to do anything but make them mad--that's pushy. But maintaining contact over a period of months isn't pushy at all. However, when you call, you must have a reason. Simply calling to ask "have you made a decision" isn't going to get you too far. Every time you communicate with a client or prospect you're either training them to pay attention to you because you have something of value for them, or you're training them to ignore you because all you do is waste their time. You have to bring value to every communication--verbal or written.

Secondly, if you suspect that you're just being strung along, there is nothing wrong with simply asking if they are really saying "no." That's hard for a lot of salespeople to do because they hate that dreaded "no." But some prospects are simply too meek to use the word.

Third, ask to put in a very small selection of your best sellers on consignment for a short period of time. If you have the confidence, let them see how well your product sells. Your only request is that your consignment batch be given a prominent position for display.

Or, simply ask for a definite date to come back or call back for an answer. There isn't anything wrong with asking for a decision either. - by pmccord
Thanks ...This was awesome... that definitely helps a lot! Appreciate your effort! - by a4khatri
A quick and easy way I find is by watching the customer or clients body language. If you notice the customer seem fine to start with then changes to wanting to "think about it" or "talk to my partner" you have more then likely pushed that boundary. - by Snowboy
Q: When am I being too pushy?

A: When they ask you to stop calling. ;tmt - by Houston
Q: When am I being too pushy?

A: When they ask you to stop calling. ;tmt
Good point Houston - by Snowboy
Sales is many things but a key for me has always been persistence and determination! sn; - by Allan Johnson
Persistance certainly pays off but you can't win them all. In saying that it doesn't mena you don't try again later. - by Snowboy
Well, This is exactly what happens -
one says on the samples "everything looks good We might be able to finalize by sometime in August"
Another "I am out of country till the end of July we'll contact when we get back"
third one "We re in the process of deciding it, we'll get back to you!"
fourth one "Your work is great, we'll definitely work with you but we dont have anything for you now."

Similar to all manufacturer to reseller situations, there is always a more collabertaive relationship that exists. They are probably resistant to switch from current suppliers. I feel there might be a need to get their confidence, yet not be too pushy! They just keep postponing it, never come to decide! need to sizzle the deal!
I know this was posted a while ago.
I think the problem here is that you are not supporting the prospect in making a buying decision. Most of what you are coming up against are objections or excuses to get rid of you. These prospects dont sound as if they are very committed to doing business with you, but it is possible to reduce this type of response from future prospects by helping them with the decision making process:

I would start asking questions like:
"How would you go about making a decision to buy these types of items"
"What else would you need to know to be sure you were making the right decision about purchasing these"
"Who else is involved in the decision making process"
"what impact would buying these, have on your budget"
"How would you know that these products would be right for you - how would you measure the success of that purchase"
"What needs to happen/ in place for you to be sure it is the right time to buy these products"
"Under what conditions, would you consider using me as a secondary supplier"
"What more would you need to know, about the work I do, to be happy that I can fill your requirements"
"What criteria would I have to meet, to be considered as a supplier"

Hopefully you will have now sorted this out - so I hope it may help for the future.

Good Luck - by zandrea
In my opinion you should absolutly call them back at least a few times per month with the probing questions that you've been given, but also you could try to do a side by side comparison with their suppliers, and that would be a time that you will prove that your product and your service is superior to the provider that they have. As long as you are confident that your company is by far better than the ones that they are using, you will let them know that by your voice on the phone, and your over all attitude. If you can make yourself not feel guilty about your follow up calls they will not feel like you are pressuring them too much! Hope this helps... ~ ;wk - by lacey
Every single time you're with a prospect, you need to close for something (not always an order). For example, when they tell you "... maybe in August...", you need to understand why August and not now. So, you might try, "... just to make sure I understand you, what will happen between now and August?".

If the answer doesn't make sense, ask questions which will help you understand.

YOU NEED TO WORK THIS TOPIC INTO THE DIALOGUE: Make sure you fully understand the relationship with the main supplier(s): they might be relatives! If it's not family, ask the question, "... when you originally started dealing with them, what specific criteria made you select them over competitors?" and, "... now that you've been working with them for a period of time, what improvements would you appreciate seeing?"

Have them assign priority to the list of criteria in selecting "the perfect supplier". When pushed into this mode, I frame the question like this, "... if I handed you the canvas and pallet and asked you to paint me a picture of the perfect supplier, what would it look like?" Seems abstract but you'd be surprised how it brings things into focus.

Never let a prospect think that "persistence" is bad: "Wouldn't you prefer that all of your SRs were working their prospects in a similar fashion?".

Not all of your suspects will turn into prospects into customers! But you need to remember that there is a time dynamic in sales, so, today's suspects are tomorrow's customers! Never leave without advancing the sales cycle ...

Good luck & Good selling!
Pat - by OUTSource Sales
"But you need to remember that there is a time dynamic in sales, so, today's suspects are tomorrow's customers! Never leave without advancing the sales cycle ..." -- Pat

Pat gives lots of food for thought in helping people facilitate their decision - that there is a time dynamic is important to understand. I've also seen people, and I've done it myself, lose track of the element of time and lose sales opportunities because of that.

It's not about pushing for a sale; it's about realizing the value of time and maintaining a good relationship.

MitchM - by MitchM
You need to remember that you're not the only SR calling on them and greeting SRs was never 100% of their job description.

You need to be 'net' and to the point. You need to be interested in their business and if you realize that your offering doesn't fit their needs ... once you're convinced of it, you need to move on!

That's right ... gather the info, file it and move on!

Good luck & Good selling!
Pat - by OUTSource Sales
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