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The Pro and Cons Close

This technique is best for those clients who still require confirmation that they have made the right decision. Draw up two columns headed YES to Investment and NO to Investment. Work through the pros and cons with the client from the proposal you have already put forward and the objections you have received. If you have done your lead-up work well the yes column wins.

Your thoughts on this idea?msnwnk; - by Snowboy
This technique is best for those clients who still require confirmation that they have made the right decision. Draw up two columns headed YES to Investment and NO to Investment. Work through the pros and cons with the client from the proposal you have already put forward and the objections you have received. If you have done your lead-up work well the yes column wins.

Your thoughts on this idea?msnwnk;
Your strategy is sound and a great one to have in a collection of strategies to un-stall forward movement with a prospect.

Many people call it the "Ben Franklin" close. - by Skip Anderson
So is this after the decision has been made and the investment has been made and finalized? If not, when does this occur? If it is then when does it occur - days, weeks later? I'm trying to understand the sequence of events. Thanks.

MitchM - by MitchM
So is this after the decision has been made and the investment has been made and finalized? If not, when does this occur? If it is then when does it occur - days, weeks later? I'm trying to understand the sequence of events. Thanks.

MitchM
It's a closing tool, used primarily when there is hestancy so you can help the customer analyze if moving forward with the purchase is in his/her own best interests. - by Skip Anderson
What it read like to me, Skip, was that it wasn't a "closing tool" but something after the close when the closeee still wasn't convinced his/her decision was the right one - that's my confusion.

I'm not schooled or experienced in sales as most professionals in sales - I've done some small sales throughout my life but my career in teaching was primary until I started with a direct selling/network marketing company with nutritional products eleven years ago.

What you've posted looks like something someone might go over when someone has decided to invest in some securities or made a big decision but is still a little uneasy.

Tell me more -- thanks.

MitchM - by MitchM
What it read like to me, Skip, was that it wasn't a "closing tool" but something after the close when the closeee still wasn't convinced his/her decision was the right one - that's my confusion.

I'm not schooled or experienced in sales as most professionals in sales - I've done some small sales throughout my life but my career in teaching was primary until I started with a direct selling/network marketing company with nutritional products eleven years ago.

What you've posted looks like something someone might go over when someone has decided to invest in some securities or made a big decision but is still a little uneasy.

Tell me more -- thanks.

MitchM
No problem, MitchM. Snowboy started this thread so he may have a different concept in mine, but I've given you my reading on this technique. Perhaps Snowboy would want to answer your question, too.

This technique can be a useful closing technique if you have a prospect who is strongly leaning toward buying (it works for virtually any product or service), but still has some reservations. In my opinion, it works best with cautious and analytical prospects with whom you have developed a high level of trust, but who you think deep down really want to buy your product/service.

You take a sheet of paper (or whiteboard or Word document or whatever) and put two columns on it. Write "Reasons To Buy" as the heading above the left column and "Reasons Not to Buy" as the heading above the right column. Then, you ask the prospect to tell you all the reasons he thinks he should go ahead and commit to the purchase, and you write them down under the left column (or have the prospect write them down). Then you ask him to write all the reasons he doesn't think he should buy under the other column.

Usually, this is a review of information which has already been discussed, but sometimes the prospect shares some new information.

Since this is sort of an analytical exercise, analytical people sometimes respond to it. Often, after visually seeing the pros and cons in writing, the prospect decides to go ahead with the purchase. It's a way of helping the prospect decide, using his own conclusions as the buying criteria.

That's my two cents. Snowboy and others, please feel free to respond if you have additional info or a different point-of-view.

The best to you! - by Skip Anderson
I'm aware of the exercise - I've used it for decades in a lot of situations - I'm trying to see how it fits in the close of a sale and where/when if ever.

MitchM - by MitchM
I'm aware of the exercise - I've used it for decades in a lot of situations - I'm trying to see how it fits in the close of a sale and where/when if ever.

MitchM
MitchM, sorry, but I'm not tracking you. I had hoped my description would show how it fits in the close of a sale. I'm not sure what information you're looking for.

Perhaps somebody else can help MitchM out??? - by Skip Anderson
It's simple, Skip - I asked: how it [the Yes & NO List] fits in the close of a sale and where/when if ever. That's it - maybe it's too simple to see the question I ask.