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The Pro and Cons Close

This technique is best for those clients who still require confirmation that they have made the right decision. Draw up two columns headed YES to Investment and NO to Investment. Work through the pros and cons with the client from the proposal you have already put forward and the objections you have received. If you have done your lead-up work well the yes column wins.

Your thoughts on this idea?msnwnk; - by Snowboy
This technique is best for those clients who still require confirmation that they have made the right decision. Draw up two columns headed YES to Investment and NO to Investment. Work through the pros and cons with the client from the proposal you have already put forward and the objections you have received. If you have done your lead-up work well the yes column wins.

Your thoughts on this idea?msnwnk;
Your strategy is sound and a great one to have in a collection of strategies to un-stall forward movement with a prospect.

Many people call it the "Ben Franklin" close. - by Skip Anderson
So is this after the decision has been made and the investment has been made and finalized? If not, when does this occur? If it is then when does it occur - days, weeks later? I'm trying to understand the sequence of events. Thanks.

MitchM - by MitchM
So is this after the decision has been made and the investment has been made and finalized? If not, when does this occur? If it is then when does it occur - days, weeks later? I'm trying to understand the sequence of events. Thanks.

MitchM
It's a closing tool, used primarily when there is hestancy so you can help the customer analyze if moving forward with the purchase is in his/her own best interests. - by Skip Anderson
What it read like to me, Skip, was that it wasn't a "closing tool" but something after the close when the closeee still wasn't convinced his/her decision was the right one - that's my confusion.

I'm not schooled or experienced in sales as most professionals in sales - I've done some small sales throughout my life but my career in teaching was primary until I started with a direct selling/network marketing company with nutritional products eleven years ago.

What you've posted looks like something someone might go over when someone has decided to invest in some securities or made a big decision but is still a little uneasy.

Tell me more -- thanks.

MitchM - by MitchM
What it read like to me, Skip, was that it wasn't a "closing tool" but something after the close when the closeee still wasn't convinced his/her decision was the right one - that's my confusion.

I'm not schooled or experienced in sales as most professionals in sales - I've done some small sales throughout my life but my career in teaching was primary until I started with a direct selling/network marketing company with nutritional products eleven years ago.

What you've posted looks like something someone might go over when someone has decided to invest in some securities or made a big decision but is still a little uneasy.

Tell me more -- thanks.

MitchM
No problem, MitchM. Snowboy started this thread so he may have a different concept in mine, but I've given you my reading on this technique. Perhaps Snowboy would want to answer your question, too.

This technique can be a useful closing technique if you have a prospect who is strongly leaning toward buying (it works for virtually any product or service), but still has some reservations. In my opinion, it works best with cautious and analytical prospects with whom you have developed a high level of trust, but who you think deep down really want to buy your product/service.

You take a sheet of paper (or whiteboard or Word document or whatever) and put two columns on it. Write "Reasons To Buy" as the heading above the left column and "Reasons Not to Buy" as the heading above the right column. Then, you ask the prospect to tell you all the reasons he thinks he should go ahead and commit to the purchase, and you write them down under the left column (or have the prospect write them down). Then you ask him to write all the reasons he doesn't think he should buy under the other column.

Usually, this is a review of information which has already been discussed, but sometimes the prospect shares some new information.

Since this is sort of an analytical exercise, analytical people sometimes respond to it. Often, after visually seeing the pros and cons in writing, the prospect decides to go ahead with the purchase. It's a way of helping the prospect decide, using his own conclusions as the buying criteria.

That's my two cents. Snowboy and others, please feel free to respond if you have additional info or a different point-of-view.

The best to you! - by Skip Anderson
I'm aware of the exercise - I've used it for decades in a lot of situations - I'm trying to see how it fits in the close of a sale and where/when if ever.

MitchM - by MitchM
I'm aware of the exercise - I've used it for decades in a lot of situations - I'm trying to see how it fits in the close of a sale and where/when if ever.

MitchM
MitchM, sorry, but I'm not tracking you. I had hoped my description would show how it fits in the close of a sale. I'm not sure what information you're looking for.

Perhaps somebody else can help MitchM out??? - by Skip Anderson
It's simple, Skip - I asked: how it [the Yes & NO List] fits in the close of a sale and where/when if ever. That's it - maybe it's too simple to see the question I ask.

Snowboy posted: [should the client] still require confirmation that they have made the right decision [this Yes/NO technique might help]. My question arises from that - nothing more.

I'm trying to understand it. My understanding is that if you buy XYZ from me, the deal is sealed and we shake on it then depart for a coffee shop or the next gig - or the gym - I needn't have to pacify your fears with a YES/NO list after the sale.

That's what I'm seeking to understand. Snowboy needs to help me out here.

The best of the best to you.

MitchM - by MitchM
Snowboy posted: [should the client] still require confirmation that they have made the right decision [this Yes/NO technique might help]. My question arises from that - nothing more.

I'm trying to understand it. My understanding is that if you buy XYZ from me, the deal is sealed and we shake on it then depart for a coffee shop or the next gig - or the gym - I needn't have to pacify your fears with a YES/NO list after the sale.
This is a closing technique (occuring after the presentation) that seeks to reassure the prospective buyer that he/she is making the right decision (not a pacifier after the sale). Does that help MitchM? - by AZBroker
Closing should start at the beginning of your sales process.
If you close twenty to thirty times during your sales process, the prospect will amost always create the final close without your help.

If you wait until the end of your sales process to close, you find that you are involved in too many contentious contests. - by JacquesWerth
If you wait until the end of your sales process to close, you find that you are involved in too many contentious contests. - JW

What are some of the immediate signs of being in a contentious contest.

Thank you.

MitchM - by MitchM
If you wait until the end of your sales process to close, you will find that you are involved in too many contentious contests. - JW

What are some of the immediate signs of being in a contentious contest.

MitchM
Whether your prospect is unconvinced, reluctant, disinclined or adamant, and not enthusiastically saying "Yes," the next step is usually unnecessarily contentious. - by JacquesWerth
Thanks, Jacques.

by "unnecessarily contentious" I take it you mean - from everything I've read of yours - argumetative and warlike thus stress producing, resistance producing, low self-esteem producing, and hence time wasting if your intention is to make a sale.

Correct?

MitchM - by MitchM
Thanks, Jacques.

by "unnecessarily contentious" I take it you mean - from everything I've read of yours - argumetative and warlike thus stress producing, resistance producing, low self-esteem producing, and hence time wasting if your intention is to make a sale.
Correct?

MitchM
That's right! - by JacquesWerth
As has been mentioned previously on this thread, this technique for gaining closure has been called The Ben Frankin Close. Franklin revealed in his Autobiography that he sometimes made decisions in a similar way. The Ben Franklin close is good filler material for sales trainers who run out of things to preach, but I seriously doubt that it is anything to take to heart for a serious sales professional. I think that "closing" consists of a series of incremental affirmations, and that the final "yes" on the dotted line is derived as a result of that process. It's fun to talk about fancy techniques, as if "closing" was something powerful to do at the end, but in my experience, it doesn't happen that way. And---I've done all right so far. - by Joe Closer
As has been mentioned previously on this thread, this technique for gaining closure has been called The Ben Frankin Close. Franklin revealed in his Autobiography that he sometimes made decisions in a similar way. The Ben Franklin close is good filler material for sales trainers who run out of things to preach, but I seriously doubt that it is anything to take to heart for a serious sales professional. I think that "closing" consists of a series of incremental affirmations, and that the final "yes" on the dotted line is derived as a result of that process. It's fun to talk about fancy techniques, as if "closing" was something powerful to do at the end, but in my experience, it doesn't happen that way. And---I've done all right so far.
It may or may not be used as a "closing technique". But whenever it's used (near the end of a sales process or earlier) it certainly can be used to great effect to help lead a prospect through an analysis of his/her situation. It's not appropriate for everyone, or for every situation, but it can be a terrific tool with the right prospect in the right situation.

By the way, I've used it with my wife repeatedly over the course of our relationship, and since she's the one that makes the analysis, it helps her to move forward when facing a big decision. She's not naturally analytical, but this tool helps her be analytical when facing a decision.

I don't consider it a "fancy technique." It's really just common sense. - by Skip Anderson
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