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Sales questioning skills

What are a few examples of "questioning skills"? Is that just a generic terms for knowing different types of questions? - by Bulldog
What are a few examples of "questioning skills"? Is that just a generic terms for knowing different types of questions?
Yes-it is exactly that, as used by many.

Others, including myself, use the term with a different meaning: Knowing what questions to ask.

Both address the issue of the importance of questions in selling. - by Gary Boye
What are a few examples of "questioning skills"? Is that just a generic terms for knowing different types of questions?
Here are a few examples I've come across:

Information:
  • Who
  • What
  • Where
  • When
  • Why
  • How
Precision:
  • What exactly?
  • How much?
Reflective:
So you're saying that...

Clarifying:
Are you saying that...?

Understanding:
Could you explain that further? - by SalesGuy
I think another part of questionning skills relates to knowing your product or service so well that you get all the information you need the first time.

I've had experiences where a sales person will come back from a call, all excited about an order for a widget. Then, you ask: do they want our brown widget or the blue one? do they want widget-light or the heavy-duty widget? what are they going to use the widget for?

If there are no answers, the rep is off on another visit or phone call. Bad form.

And, of course, one of the biggest questioning skills we all need to hone is learning how to listen. ;)

Kathleen - by KSA-Mktg
Does anyone have referrence or source material for the different types of questions like SalesGuy posted? - by Jomsom
The Information questions that Sales Guy bulleted are basically the same that journalists learn and are fundamental for the purpose of collecting data.

I think the question form he described as "Precision" are most adaptive to strategic selling. The reason I say that is those questions advance the sales conversation/interview which is critical.

I advise using extreme caution with "So you're saying that..." (Clarifying) or "Are you saying that..(Clarifying)

A lot of people do not like to have there own words reframed or even paraphrased in a conversation. In some cases they can become offended. You are better off asking them to tell you more (Understanding). And then continue to listen creatively. For instance, if you even study some of the discussions on a forum like this, you might find subtle changes in the tone of the conversation after such reframing takes place. Most people like to pride themselves on saying exactly what they mean.

I have a friend from Brooklyn who refers to that reframing as "The Anudder Woids Syndrome." He chooses to avoid it also.

Sales Guy left out Rhetorical Questions and we should thank him for that. I think they should be eliminated along with mayonnaise and mosquitos. But it's tough for anybody to do that. - by Gary Boye
I advise using extreme caution with "So you're saying that..." (Clarifying) or "Are you saying that..(Clarifying)
This one drives me up a wall. It reminds me of conversations I've had with attorneys who tried to twist my words around. :mad: - by AZBroker
These are the types of questions used, best that I've come up with (with a filter of sales)

1.) open ended
2.) alternate of choice
3.) involvement
4.) tie down
5.) bouce back

open ended: POWERFULL... designed and crafted, not off the top of your head questions. But ones that really either uncover pleasure or pain.

alternate of choice: I use this to set appointments. (which of these two will work best for you) or bragging about the objection up front. (ya know, most people i talk to usually either think one of three things. 1.) 2.) 3.) )

Involvement questions: Get them mentally and emotionally involved in your product being in their lives.

tie down: Over used in my oppinion, but if you design when and where you use them... those yes's have a critical effect in persuading people.

Bounce back: Answering a question with a question. (tom hopkins style is annoying) but i've found one use for this that works great, but i'll talk about that later :D

Im sure there are more, but again, thats the best i've come up with, in terms of TYPES of questions.

I didnt really get into how I like to use them, because my industry is so specific.. or take the time to craft the use of these questions to other industries, but like anything else... take the best, leave the rest :D

Jason - by jasonc
What are a few examples of "questioning skills"? Is that just a generic terms for knowing different types of questions?
Hi Bulldog

Hand in hand with questioning skills, are listening skills. You may have all the questioning skills but without active listening, I think questioning is a waste of time.

Also I would suggest learning a questioning "framework" rather than what may appear as canned questions. - by tessa
Hi Bulldog

Hand in hand with questioning skills, are listening skills. You may have all the questioning skills but without active listening, I think questioning is a waste of time.

Also I would suggest learning a questioning "framework" rather than what may appear as canned questions.
Attentive listening is listening with total concentration to understand with no waiting mental index of responses or overcoming-of-objections lines obscuring the words you should be hearing.

Necessary questions formulate themselves in the attentive listener. I'm not implying that one shouldn't study listening and questioning skills and techniques. - by MitchM
Also I would suggest learning a questioning "framework" rather than what may appear as canned questions.
Do you have an example of this type of framework? - by bridger480
Except for SalesGuy's list of information questions most of the questions described in the other posts are manipulative and should only be used on Low Probability Prospects (LPPs). Since you shouldn't be wasting time with LPPs, you don't need them.

The most sophisticated and most effective questions are based on the last thing that the prospect said. - by JacquesWerth
you should only clarify and restate if it is an objection. you shouldn't use this technique for "fact finding".

also great book for you all to read if you haven't yet........."how to master the art of selling" by Tom Hopkins - by jimfcadi
Thanks for the suggestion Jim. Asking questions as with other sales skills takes some practice and you need to personalize it with your own personality. Some people can prosper with asking certain specific questions whereas another person may not be so lucky and it may backfire of him or her. Of course the key here is to build rapport with your customers. - by salespro929
Thanks for the suggestion Jim. Asking questions as with other sales skills takes some practice and you need to personalize it with your own personality. Some people can prosper with asking certain specific questions whereas another person may not be so lucky and it may backfire of him or her. Of course the key here is to build rapport with your customers.
Asking the right questions is easy, if you develop a questionnaire for each of your products and services. That way, you can write down the prospect's answers, which should become a part of your closing process.

You can either "build rapport" or develop a Relationship of Mutual Trust and Respect. Which one do you think will maximize your closing average? - by JacquesWerth
Asking the right questions is easy, if you develop a questionnaire for each of your products and services. That way, you can write down the prospect's answers, which should become a part of your closing process.
Jacques, how does that become part of the closing process? Is the questionnaire to be used in the qualifying stage or the demonstration stage? - by realtor
Jacques, how does that become part of the closing process? Is the questionnaire to be used in the qualifying stage or the demonstration stage?
The questionnaire is used throughout the entire sales process.

Closing = Commitment. Commitment questions are asked with regard to every feature that is discussed. The accumulation of commitments culminates in the final commitment which salespeople call the "close." - by JacquesWerth
The questionnaire is used throughout the entire sales process.

Closing = Commitment. Commitment questions are asked with regard to every feature that is discussed. The accumulation of commitments culminates in the final commitment which salespeople call the "close."
Jacques describes this process better than anyone I've found - Gary adds insight and depth better than anyone I've found - I'm in a personal study of all of that and doing that for the past couple of years I'm improving.

My biggest stumbling block is me - getting in the way of myself by regressing to weakness and old habits that are not smart business and my lack of motivation which neither Jacques nor Gary can help.

BUT finding that the so called "close" is happening from the beginning to the end of a business relationship because of a commitment and clarity along every step of the way has been an illumination to me - that eye opening. - by MitchM
The questionnaire is used throughout the entire sales process.

Closing = Commitment. Commitment questions are asked with regard to every feature that is discussed. The accumulation of commitments culminates in the final commitment which salespeople call the "close."
I'll put a questionnaire together immediately. ;co - by realtor
Jacques describes this process better than anyone I've found - Gary adds insight and depth better than anyone I've found - I'm in a personal study of all of that and doing that for the past couple of years I'm improving.

My biggest stumbling block is me - getting in the way of myself by regressing to weakness and old habits that are not smart business and my lack of motivation which neither Jacques nor Gary can help.

BUT finding that the so called "close" is happening from the beginning to the end of a business relationship because of a commitment and clarity along every step of the way has been an illumination to me - that eye opening.
It does not take much motivation to sit down at your computer and start to write out your sales process questionnaire, customizing it for your product or service.

It does not take much motivation to print out the questionnaire.

It does not take much motivation to take the questionnaire out and start asking all of questions, including the commitment questions, and writing down the prospect's answers. Each time you use it you may discover new Conditions of Satisfaction that you can add to it.

Your questionnaire will guide you and your prospects through a highly efficient sales process - and your closing average will soar. - by JacquesWerth
What are a few examples of "questioning skills"? Is that just a generic terms for knowing different types of questions?
Hi Bulldog,

a couple of really good books come to mind. "SPIN Selling" and "Secrets of Question Based Selling" by Thomas Freese.

(a lifetime of selling wisdom for the price of a full tank of gas) - by ginoayn
This one drives me up a wall. It reminds me of conversations I've had with attorneys who tried to twist my words around. :mad:
Using clarifying questions is fine, I think, as long as they are used simply to clarify, rather than manipulate. Anyone who tries to twist someones words will:
a) Annoy the prospect
b) Probably not get the sale
Personally, I use clarifying questions, but literally to get them to confirm that I have properly understood what they want. - by Ed McLean
Xerox's formal training program PSS1 improved with age (PSS2 & PSS3). Ultimately, these evolved into SPIN (Situation, Problems, Implications, Needs-Payoff).

These were ultimately founded in the SR's ability "to ask questions, the answers to which would advance the cycle". So, out-of-the-gates, you need to rely heavily on your ability/willingness to listen to your suspects.

These training courses built on objection handling and emphasized rephrasing the suspect's comments (to prove you were listening, to ensure you understood, and to buy you some time).

All of this to say, it isn't a question of "questioning skills" per se, rather, it's understanding where/when ...

I'd seek out Huthwaite (who acquired rights to XLS) and see where they are with sales basics. OR, find a local training company which stresses these fundamentals. OR, find an ex-Xeriod who still has their sales training manuals!

Good luck & good selling!
Pat - by OUTSource Sales
I agree with Pat.
SPIN selling is one of the best of the " Needs Selling" systems that have evolved over the last sixty years. - by JacquesWerth
While I'm at it, a few corrections:
1. "alternate of choice" ... no such thing ... it's "alternative choice" (sorry);
2. "re-phrasing" seems to have been attached erroneously to objection handling whereas it's actually a conversational way to ensure that you're understanding anything during the meeting (not just an objection);

Good luck & Good selling!
Pat - by OUTSource Sales
There is a really unique model of questioning skills that build urgency and establish rapport. Its uses peoples personal timeline and makes them reflect on thier own life and realize that they must make a change NOW.

It used to be on the website but after just checking it looks like they took the article down. You might want to email them and ask them if they can send you the article.

the site is: www.timelineselling.com

Hope this helps.

I dont know if they are still on the website but - by girlclozer
The heading on the site you present, girlclozer, reads: Selling strategies, Persuasion models, Influence, Achievement, Hypnosis and NLP

What attracts you to that, girlclozer, and how do you intend to use it in your career? Also, what happens when the person you're attempting to change through persuasive influence such as hypnosis and mind control is doing that right back to you? Can you recognize it?

MitchM - by MitchM
I have to say, I am new to this forum but I really love it. The interaction about what we do for a living is too cool.

What attracts me?
Well I would say that its really a whole selling system. They teach you how to construct the best sales presentation. How to identify the triggers that make people take action. They also teach a lot of rapport and agreement frames that seem to bring clients closer to yes.

My clients love doing business with me and thats because of the strategies they teach. I was an awful sales person before. I attended Tom Hopkins boot camp. Brian Tracy all of those guys. It was good information and I liked listening to them but for some reason I wasnt getting any better. I cant tell you how great I have done since I adopted timeline selling.

Mind control? I laughed at that one because my friends tease me about it. They say I have been hypnotized or that I have drank the kool aid.
Actually hypnosis and mind control are not the same thing. They do a great job of communicating that in the course I took. At the end of the day its about better ways to communicate with people. Yes, I can identify it if people are using it but thats ok. I like it. The truth will always come out. If I ever get married I will insist that my husband take the course (although I dont think they are currently offering it)

They like to say that they have raving fan students. I guess I am one of them. Its just because I have done so well since the course. I know at least 7 others that took the course before or after I did and they are all doing outstanding as well.

Now the bad part. here is what I really dont like. If I had to come up with something I would say that its a lot of work to learn all the stuff. Its kind of all or nothing with them. Sometimes I get a little lazy and sales drop every time. If I stick with the plan they taught me then its great but you have to stick with the system.

Sign up for thier newsletter. They give away a lot of free information every week.

Thanks for reply. Like I said this is fun! - by girlclozer
You've told us a lot about yourself, girlcoozer, but avoided replying to my questions which could be more instructive to everyone who reads this than generic personal opinions. So again: "What attracts you to that, girlclozer, and how do you intend to use it in your career? Also, what happens when the person you're attempting to change through persuasive influence such as hypnosis and mind control is doing that right back to you? Can you recognize it?"

Here's another question: in one specific sales situation, how did you use "this stuff" to sell? Be detailed and specific.

That would do much more to give everyone a picture of what you're getting at, girlclozer. Having been a part of forums for many years it's common for people to post generalities and theory, never get specific, and leave little to nothing that would be instructive to everyone else.

When that happens people are forced into feeling the poster is just "blowing smoke" and not contributing anything of value. Please contribute.

MitchM - by MitchM
Yikes, Thought I answered the question. Ok I'll give it another shot.

"What attracts you to that, girlclozer,
I am attracted to anything that will help me see the world through the eyes of my client.

I am also attracted to the idea that there is a certain way to construct a presentation that will make the client comfortable and put them into an agreement frame.

Many of the selling strategies used are what they call "real world" strategys. meaning that they are not just coming from a NLP or Hypnosis standpoint. They share with you in class actual studies they have done. I am attracted to the fact that this stuff is proven to work.

and how do you intend to use it in your career?
I DO CURRENTLY use it in my career. As previously stated I mostly use: The presentation construction model, the Rapport building strategy, Metaphor models of communication and their Hierachy of values model. I also use the certifications in converstaion hypnosis.

Also, what happens when the person you're attempting to change through persuasive influence such as hypnosis and mind control is doing that right back to you?
OK, I am sure I answered this one:
First off. NOBODY IS USING MIND CONTROL. The process of mind control is unethical and is not endorsed by me or anyone I have ever taken a class from. Quite frankly Mind control takes on a whole new level and for the most part is illegal.

HYPNOSIS IS NOT MIND CONTROL.
I understand the confusion as its not uncommon for most people to have a "hollywood" perception of hypnosis.

To answer the question (deleting the mind control part) I have had two instances where the client (very well educated) was using it right back to me. In both cases the client and I welcomed the exchange. Those who understand NLP, conversational hypnosis LOVE when the language is used back. In both cases the client and I built great rapport and the sale was made.

IMPORTANT POINT: NLP and conversational hypnosis DO NOT WORK IF WHAT YOU ARE SELLING IS BAD FOR THE CLIENT. The unconsious mind is there to PROTECT.
Old movies greatly exaggerate the effect of hypnosis.

I said earlier that if I ever was to get married, Iwould insist that my husband take the same courses I did. That is because I am not afraid of it, I welcome it. AT THE END OF THE DAY ITS THE PUREST FORM OF REAL COMMUNICATION. If what you have to communicate is bad for the client, it will come out!!!! You better be selling something good for it to work.


Can you recognize it?"
Of course.

Here's another question: in one specific sales situation, how did you use "this stuff" to sell? Be detailed and specific.

I just returned from a trip to San Francisco. My client has had a prospect they were working on for 9 years. They meet with that prospect for about 20 minutes twice a year. They always show thier service and the prospect always thanks them for thier time but declines. The only reason this prospect (C.O.O) ever meets with my client is out of courtesy to my client. (they have had a mutual associate for many years)
This time I went with my client to meet with the prospect. Before arriving I sent his assitant a Pre frame sheet (time line selling technique) I of course dont refer to it as a pre frame sheet to the client. Lets just call it 2 pages of testimonials of rather big names who have done business with me.

For the first 8 minutes, I just listened and decoded the language of the prospect. (time line selling technique) I then asked a couple of questions to the prospect only this time I used his own language.

This built a good rapport.

I then asked him to give me a time line of the company up to the present. He did, the company had a surprisingly humble begining and was now a huge player within thier respecive industry. I then (time line selling) asked him to go out into the future and tell me where the company will be if these particular issues that he is facing are resolved (future pace, TLS technique) After he described the company and where they now were 5 years into the future, I suggested that he come back to the present. "Now looking ahead at what the future looks like, let me ask you, Is it really that important to you that this company achieves that in the next 5 years?" He waited a minute and then agreed.

I then asked him if his associate gave him the 2 sheets of testimonials. He said yes. I then said (TLS technique) "I am sure you recognize many of the names that have allowed me to help them, One thing they all had in common was that they had a vision for the next five years. I dont mean to be presumptious here but you remind me a lot of those other clients. I am here for only one reason and that is to let you know that if you want to proceed, I will personally be here for the next five years to help you get your vision. Just like my other clients I will then ask you in five years to add your name to my list of raving fan clients."

He agreed to go furthur, an appointment was made for the following day (rare in that business) and the deal was agreed to the next day (also rare) Paper work has been sent and signatures are being completed Monday.



That would do much more to give everyone a picture of what you're getting at,

I dont know if I accomplished what you are looking for. I didnt want to ramble on however you said be specific.

girlclozer. Having been a part of forums for many years it's common for people to post generalities and theory, never get specific,
Hopefully that will not be an issue in the future
- by girlclozer
You've filled in the blanks, girlclozer. That's good because people posting here like anywhere - face-to-face or screen-to-impression - will fill in the blanks if you don't.

"I just listened and decoded the language of the prospect. (time line selling technique) I then asked a couple of questions to the prospect only this time I used his own language. " -- girlclozer

If you feel like it, sometime explain what it means to "decode the language of the prospect" then use his own I presume, decoded (or not?) language back at him.

MitchM - by MitchM
girlclozer, I am always curious when I hear radical approaches, so, please favour me with a few questions:
1. what are you selling?
2. into what industries are you selling it?
3. what is the average deal size?
4. would you classify the offering as a "product" or a "service"?
5. what is the typical selling cycle?

Your thread has left me somewhat confused with such comments as, "... My client has had a prospect they were working on for 9 years ...". For example, the word "prospect" means that there is hope and that the decision-making process have been clearly identified (included time lines). How is your "client's prospect" the object of your call? And, how complex is the offering (given the 9 year selling cycle)?

In a recent past life (recruiting business), my partner utilzed his NLP (neuro linguistic programming), to more efficiently interview candidates. Although he swore by its effectiveness, I found that it left many questions unanswered. In point of fact, he admitted that NLP has the potential to make effective 2-way communications difficult (where one party is not dipped in the NLP waters).

So, I find myself with some credibility issues in an approach which alters normal human communications.

Good luck & Good selling!
Pat - by OUTSource Sales
1. what are you selling?
I realize that some on here like specifics but in fairness to my clients and quite frankly my career, I will be very vague. I sell my services to companies that want to sell thier investment services.



2. into what industries are you selling it?

Two types of industries. Commercial Real Estate, Computer Services Both from an investment standpoint.


3. what is the average deal size?

Small ones $200,000. Largest deal for me personally was 9 million. Average around 2 million.

4. would you classify the offering as a "product" or a "service"?

SERVICE when I get paid to help my clients sell thier PRODUCTS to other companies. So both.

5. what is the typical selling cycle?

The industry standard takes about two months to close a deal. I generally can close a deal in three weeks and then of course you have to wait for the usual beurocratic process to finalize.

Your thread has left me somewhat confused with such comments as, "... My client has had a prospect they were working on for 9 years ...".

I sell my services to other companies that have a hard time selling thier products and services. As stated some of my clients have commercial real estate investments as well as computer technologies to invest in. When they have a tough client, they will pay me to come along and assist them in closing the sale. I also sell some of these real estate investments on my own.


how complex is the offering (given the 9 year selling cycle)?
Very complex. I rarely understand the computer services. I only deal with the final outcome of the products and services. I will not get into specifics with the clients on certain compexitys. I have experts that go with me that only talk about those things if need be. The fact of the matter is that most of the time the decision maker doesnt understand all the technical things either.

Many sales people in this industry realize that commissions can be rather large. If they have a "Prospect" (someone they think might one day invest) they will stop in and see them. They are generally hoping to keep the lines of communication open so that one day they can earn thier business. Many times they come baring gifts. (Laker tickets and so on)



In a recent past life (recruiting business), my partner utilzed his NLP (neuro linguistic programming), to more efficiently interview candidates. Although he swore by its effectiveness, I found that it left many questions unanswered.

NLP is a thearpy based technology and has had ground breaking results in that field. It is not a sales based technololgy. The reason I took Mickey Booher's course (although he no longer offers it today) was because he was one of the few sales people that was able to adapt this tremendous technology into "real world" selling techniques. Most NLP students I know have not made that transition well enough. So I understand where you are coming from.

In point of fact, he admitted that NLP has the potential to make effective 2-way communications difficult (where one party is not dipped in the NLP waters).

That I would humbly disagree with. When used correctly there can be no purer form of communication. Both parties are very comfortable with each other and in fact say things they wouldnt in a "Normal" enviornment.
Think of it this way. have you have ever had a friend or someone that you really connected with? I mean you just hit it off! The two of you were on the same page and you might have even felt like if you were ever going to have a business partner, this would be the person. You know that feeling? Well when you had those expierences, both you and the other person were using NLP. You just were not using it conciously. NLP is the most natural thing in the world and we all use it without knowing it.

If that makes since.

So, I find myself with some credibility issues in an approach which alters normal human communications.
As stated above, NLP (done right) actually creates a "normal" human communication. I want to reiterate something though. Your view points are completely understandable. Today many people say they know NLP. Others take a 7 day crash course and get an entry level certification and say "hey I am an NLP expert"

Those people make us all lose credibility.

Mickey Booher takes all of the therapy aspect out of the process and only teaches the areas that help in a sales situation. With time line selling you can take bits and pieces or dive all the way in. Learn as you go! I always tell people to log on and sign up for the free newsletter. If you like what you read then keep reading, if not move on to something that works for you. This seems to really work for me. With that said I am sensitive to the fact that others might not want to invest the time and energy.


Thanks for you reply. I look forward to reading more of your post. - by girlclozer
girlclozer, your patter is just too slippery. You make some grand statements but everything behind the bluster seems predicated on quicksand.

For example, you have more typo's than would seem appropriate for someone selling "at your level".

No one has either asked for or expects "specifics" (re. what you're selling). You seem to evade the question about what is being sold. The forum doesn't want to know your customers. We're all seeking enlightenment.

On the topic of NLP, I never said it was a sales-based program. My partner was using it to interview candidates. Although he positioned himself as being "advanced", the candidates professed to feeling that his style was concerning because entire topics were not covered. He felt that he could do an "exhaustive" interview in 15 minutes! Although you state, "no purer form of communication", our candidates expected more.

Sorry, I'm simply not buying ...

Good luck & Good selling!
Pat - by OUTSource Sales
Wow, a lot of hostility here.
I have been critisized for not giving specifics now when I do you make rude innuendos.
You dont have to buy it because I am not selling anything to you. You asked, I answered.
I dont know if you have an issue with women in this industry or it's something else. Your combative nature though is unwarranted. If you ask a question and dont like the answer then move on. Perhaps in the future you might find it less stressful to avoid my post. - by girlclozer
I understand your frustration, girlclozer. When you feel you've answered in specifics and the other person doesn't feel you have and sees it differently and asks for more information, it does produce frustration. Also there is a critical quality about Pat's inquiry of you that's evident - Pat is skilled at asking critical questions here.

Look, here's the deal. Many people post on forums using lots of theory and prose that offer little insight into what they actually do or clear answers to genuine questions about a topic. So look at it differently than a dispute between two people: you meet someone who says he or she sells but won't disclose what's being sold and that it's in this or that industry, and that he or she sells bottom end $200,000 - top end two million. You understand all that but there seems to be still something vague and you still have questions.

Now girlclozer, you have been under the impression it's going to be a candid and thorough conversation with this person but you feel there are gaps so you ask questions important to you which still aren't answered. It just makes you feel frustrated AND more importantly question the motives of that person.

How would you feel?

That's the kind of situation you might emphasize with - obviously no one has to answer anything he or she doesn't want to answer.

Obviously making the kind of deals you make puts you at the top of the industry and someone who could contribute much more in depth and detail to this forum.

MitchM - by MitchM
Thank you for your reply.

I would submit that you are correct as it relates to the first post. Questions are obviously important to any discourse. I believe though that any reasonable person that re-reads the last post to me would not see a person skilled at critical questions. Rather someone that was being accusatory. Apparently the issues go way beyond the scope of what is appropriate here.

With that said, I would think that the category of "investments" should suffice for the needs of this forum.

One last thing. I really do appreciate your compliment. I would like to make one thing very clear though. In my expierience, people who sell "big ticket" items are not necessarily any better sales people than people who sell lower priced products or services. So I do appreciate the compliment but want to reiterate that I am not making claims here of being any better than others on this forum.

Thanks again - by girlclozer
girlclozer -

I should add that Pat aka OUTSource Sales asks critical and challenging quesitons of everyone here - so I wouldn't feel genderphobic about his posts. Also, I understand how we all can come across as hostile from time to time and how that reflects either side of the question is a study in itself.

I've felt that hostility and it's source has sometimes been from a hostile poster and other times a reflection of my own hostile attitude. The difference is for each of us to discern accurately.

It could be a fact, though, that if you are consistently closing $200,000 - $2,000,000 deals you are in the top 1% of all sales professionals which is all the more reason to be candid and fluent.

MitchM - by MitchM
girlclozer, if you took the time to roll all the way back to the start of this thread, you'd find the basis for my comments. It has nothing to do with hostility or gender! In fact, those comments are way off-base.

Any "rude innuendo" is in reaction to your cavalier approach, you need to wait before you reply.

On the one hand, you claim to offer some mysterious sort of pre-sales support to investment and computer services companies with transactions in the $200K plus range with sales cycles to 9 years. But, on the other, you seem unable to describe the offering which you're apparently providing assistance selling.

girlclozer, I've been selling computer services for decades and to the best of my knowledge there are no "mercenaries" out there who have come in to assist my efforts. Where we've gotten involved in complex financing, we've had superlative support from the 3rd party leasing companies (eg. IBM Global Finance). Are you brought in as a "consultant"? Do you get paid if the deal doesn't "go down"? What sort of companies hire you? How does a sales manage find a service which you claim to offer?

If you were genuinely interested in sharing with the participants of the forum, you would not have taken any questions the wrong way. If "sharing" isn't your intent, perhaps, this isn't the forum for you.

Take a breath. Go away from the forum and when you come back, read the forum from the start.

Here are a few suggestions which will make your experience much more meaningful for all involved:
1. when you provide "proof-sources" to back-up a thread, you really need to include the references (because we all want to see the details in perspective as we might well use the information ourselves); and,
2. comments should include some background on complexity of sale otherwise the forum cannot see the input in perspective (where you reacted negatively to my questions about industry, complexity, deal size ... the request was genuine); and,
3. instead of making broad, sweeping statements about sales techniques, it is much more acceptable when couched in terms such as, "... in my experience..."; and,
4. rather than using the forum as a "shield" when you feel roughed-up, you should send a private message directly to the individual (eg. "... am I missing something or are you slamming me..."; "...I am trying to make a point without losing the rookies..."; etc.) otherwise space in the forum is wasted; and,

I'm not the ogre which you attempt to portray me. I'm simply an experienced sales person with strong sales management credentials. And I know when smoke is being blown up my kilt.

Good luck & Good selling!
Pat - by OUTSource Sales
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