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The Role of A Strategic Sales Person

The role of a strategic salesperson is essentially two fold:
By getting the customer to see things more clearly you can help the customer to take some positive action in improving their existing situation. Why is this so important? The answer is simple - strategic sales involves understanding the world as the customer sees it. Putting yourself in their shoes! Imagine going to see your doctor, you walk into his room he shakes you by the hand and after exchanging some light pleasantries he writes a prescription and sends you on your way. Its sounds unlikely of course, but that is the mistake that many people in sales fall into. They have a product or service in mind and simply direct the conversation towards the pitch before understanding the customers current
business picture and focus. Worse still perhaps questions are asked like this , “Are you interested in …...” then when there is a negative response the conclusion is that the customer is
not interested. Were they not interested or did the salesperson just fail to interest them?

- by Salecanon
Mark,
I enjoyed your thread - keep them coming.

I used to tell my sales staff never to ask what where the customers after - if they are there you know the products you sell - If you sell cars and you have a buyer in your yard - he isn't htere to buy an elephant.

Well spoken Mark, - by Snowboy
It is relatively easy to find and do business wth prospects who already know what their needs are.

Therefore, salespeople who find it necessary to "interest the prospect," are wasting too much time with low probability prospects.
- by JacquesWerth
Well said Jacques. - by Snowboy
I find that people who are at your place of business are already interested in what you are selling, otherwise they wouldn't be there. The key for salespeople is to be INTERESTED IN THE PROSPECT.

If and when you are, in fact, truly interested in helping the prospect you will see more closed sales, higher gross profit, and very happy customers.

All the best,

Salespro - by salespro
I couldn't agree more, Salespro! - by Skip Anderson
I find that people who are at your place of business are already interested in what you are selling, otherwise they wouldn't be there. The key for salespeople is to be INTERESTED IN THE PROSPECT.

If and when you are, in fact, truly interested in helping the prospect you will see more closed sales, higher gross profit, and very happy customers. Salespro
That seems very logical, however ...
Before making large, important buying decisions, most" interested" prospects go through an information gathering stage. They typically visit three or four vendors before deciding whom to buy from.

Until they are ready to buy, they are in a sales resistant mode. Any attempts to sell them will not only be resisted, but the seller will be resented. Therefore, you might want to learn how to be the last vendor that they visit. - by JacquesWerth
I don't understand how the above post relates or has anything to do with my post. Totally different concept/mindset.

In regards to prospects being "ready to buy"- isn't the job of a salesperson to create an environment such that the prospect can make a purchase?

All the best,

salespro - by salespro
I don't understand how the above post relates or has anything to do with my post. Totally different concept/mindset.

In regards to prospects being "ready to buy"- isn't the job of a salesperson to create an environment such that the prospect can make a purchase?

All the best,
salespro
The principle reason that most salespeople never make really big money is that they believe that their primary job is to get prospects to buy. In most cases, that means to get them to change their minds from "interested" to "sold." Consider these questions.
1. How easy is it for anyone else to change your mind?
2. How easy is it for you to change your own mind?
2. When was the last time a salesperson convinced you to buy something that you were not sure you wanted and were not ready to buy?

Until you can honestly answer those questions (to yourself), you are stuck where you are. Incremental improvements to an ineffective strategy can only result in small incremental increases in closing averages. - by JacquesWerth
I believe the point I originally brought up was grossly misunderstood.

If you read my first post again it states the salesperson needs to be

INTERESTED IN THE PROSPECT.

This concept is 180 degress from "interesting the prospect" in your goods or services and has been a huge asset in my sales career.

All the best,

salespro - by salespro
I believe the point I originally brought up was grossly misunderstood.

If you read my first post again it states the salesperson needs to be INTERESTED IN THE PROSPECT.

This concept is 180 degress from "interesting the prospect" in your goods or services and has been a huge asset in my sales career.

All the best,
salespro
I still don't understand.

I read, "... isn't the job of a salesperson to create an environment such that the prospect can make a purchase?"

And, I wondered how you can create that kind of an environment for an "interested" prospect who is not ready and willing to buy - now?

I also wonder why you would bother - unless you don't have any better prospects - to spend your time and resources on than that.

Please explain in more detail; I want to learn.

Peace and joy,
Jacques - by JacquesWerth
I still don't understand.

I read, "... isn't the job of a salesperson to create an environment such that the prospect can make a purchase?"
Jacques, I don't think prospects are black and white in their readiness to "buy now."

There is a sizable "gray area" of prospect readiness to purchase a particular product or service, and in my opinion, if salespeople ignore this large prospect group, they will not maximize their sales opportunities.

The salespeople I work with who sell to consumers (in-home sales, showroom sales, financial products, etc.) would love to have a big bunch of people at hand who are just ready to buy so they can just be order-takers. But that just is not reality if you sell furniture or RVs or suits or bond funds or home improvements, in my opinion.

And, I wondered how you can create that kind of an environment for an "interested" prospect who is not ready and willing to buy - now?
I would work on increasing prospect engagement to create trust, and nurturing rich dialogue with the prospect.

The best to you! - by Skip Anderson
Jacques, I don't think prospects are black and white in their readiness to "buy now."

There is a sizable "gray area" of prospect readiness to purchase a particular product or service, and in my opinion, if salespeople ignore this large prospect group, they will not maximize their sales opportunities.

The salespeople I work with who sell to consumers (in-home sales, showroom sales, financial products, etc.) would love to have a big bunch of people at hand who are just ready to buy so they can just be order-takers. But that just is not reality if you sell furniture or RVs or suits or bond funds or home improvements, in my opinion.

I would work on increasing prospect engagement to create trust, and nurturing rich dialogue with the prospect.
The best to you!
Just as there may be "gray areas" with regard to a prospect's readiness to buy, there are also gray areas within the definition of a "sales opportunity."

That seems to change this discussion into a prospecting question. If you are in a business where you have to wait for prospects to walk into your showroom, and not many show up, and assuming prospecting won't work, then what you are saying is correct.

However, when I owned a car agency, we immediately disqualified most of the first time visitors to our showroom who were merely interested. 35% of them came back to buy a car because we did not attempt to sell them when they were not ready to buy.

Over 30% of our prospects and 52% of our customers resulted from telephone prospecting. They came in because they wanted to buy a car. In addition, That left a small percentage who bought a car the first time they visited.

Regarding bond funds, we have trained thousands of Financial Services pros. They do not waste time with prospects who are merely "interested." They know how to get appointments with those who are ready, willing and able to buy.

We have not trained anyone who sells RVs or suits, so I can't comment on that. - by JacquesWerth
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