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Business card basics

A few years ago I read an article about the Do's and Don't of handing out business cards. For instance, when to give one out and when not to. How to get the most from exchanging cards. The article was actually pretty good. I should have saved it.

Does anyone have a similar list of tips or Do's and Don'ts? - by SpeedRacer
Hi SpeedRacer,

I am quite fortunate in that my busines card has a mission statement on the back, which is geared to our industry, so I always ask the prospect to look at the back when I hand it out. This way, from the other 100 they recieve during the week from other people, they remember mine as it reminds them of how we can help!

Good Luck

Tony D from Sales Journey - by Tonyd
... my busines card has a mission statement on the back...
I've always thought this was a good idea. Now all I need is a mission statement. :eek: :D - by Mikey
Wouldn't putting your "elevator speech" on the back also be a good idea? - by Newbie
Gary Boye sent me a great book on networking by Bob Burg. His take on business cards is that the biggest value of giving your business card is to GET ONE in return. I thought this was very ineresting. - by RainMaker
Gary Boye sent me a great book on networking by Bob Burg. His take on business cards is that the biggest value of giving your business card is to GET ONE in return. I thought this was very ineresting.
What was the name of the book? Where there any other business card pointers in the book? - by Houston
I've had an opportunity to do some business with Asian people from from a few different countries and what they do with business cards is interesting. They hand them over with both hands - it's like a gift or ritual offering in a way, not just a quick: take it.

It's expected to go both ways and in that offering comes looking at the cards, almost studying them, then making a comment, asking questions, making it an important part of meeting for the first time.

I found it culturally fascinating but also liked the way it produced conversation and interest - how it produced questions: what exactly do you do? how long have you been with your company? where is your corporate office located?

It's important to get one in return most of the time. What I do usually is send a brief one or two sentence email that's friendly and acknowledges something I feel important in our meeting - or just "Good to meet you." or something like that. - by MitchM
Wouldn't putting your "elevator speech" on the back also be a good idea?
I spend the extra money to have my card laminated on both sides. I usually carry a Sharpie Extra Fine Point with me which will write on laminate and not wash off. My card is in the fashion of what was once referred to as a "calling card''. It identifies "me" more than who or what I represent.

I use my card not to be remembered--if I need to do that, I should get out of selling--but to be referred to. So--in most cases where I actually hand someone a card, I write some pertinent information on the back with my Sharpie.

Like Burg, who I agree with on many subjects, I'm much more interested in the other person's "mission" than conveying my own. In those initial chance meetings, where business cards are exchanged, I'll make it a point to keep reverting back to the other person's interests, rather than my own. This is not manipulation, or an attempt to impress the person (although it certainly can happen)--it allows me to learn about the person, assuming I'm interested.

Although some business cards are more attractive than others, its value to a recipient is about one/one hundredth of what it would be if it had some information handwritten on it that the person could use.

Business cards don't sell. People do. - by Gary Boye
I use my card not to be remembered--if I need to do that, I should get out of selling--but to be referred to. So--in most cases where I actually hand someone a card, I write some pertinent information on the back with my Sharpie....

Although some business cards are more attractive than others, its value to a recipient is about one/one hundredth of what it would be if it had some information handwritten on it that the person could use.

Business cards don't sell. People do.
This is the businesse card version of offering a free stuff on your website.":) - by RainMaker
That's good information, Gary - gives me a perspective that I half had but was unclear. So the personal note is what matters most along with the business card as a way to understand someone better? Do I get it, Gary? - by MitchM
What was the name of the book? Where there any other business card pointers in the book?
Endless Referrals by Bob Burg. It is loaded with good stuff. The extend of my reading time is only a brief respite during my son's 45 minute swim lesson, so I haven't finished it yet, but I'd recommend it.:cool: - by RainMaker
That's good information, Gary - gives me a perspective that I half had but was unclear. So the personal note is what matters most along with the business card as a way to understand someone better? Do I get it, Gary?
Well, sure--what good is a business card really. It has contact info, but by itself it doesn't really communicate any other information a person might want.

Sometimes, in a pinch, I'll use the corner of one to pop the battery out of my hearing aid. - by Gary Boye
"Sometimes, in a pinch, I'll use the corner of one to pop the battery out of my hearing aid." - Gary

You are funny! That really puts the value of the little card in perspective - utility value for everything!

To RainMaker, I'm learning still how to listen better, find out what people want and if I can help do it, but I've discovered why I don't today get endless referrals:

1. I did a poor job of communicating in the past

2. I don't circulate enough to generate enough business in the first place

Honesty hurts but unless I use this self inflicted pain to look at myself I don't think I'll achieve the things I say I want to achieve. - by MitchM
"
Honesty hurts but unless I use this self inflicted pain to look at myself I don't think I'll achieve the things I say I want to achieve.
Let's just say I keep the band-aid business afloat!:rolleyes:

Also, Gary, the corner works like a charm for getting that little piece of tuna out of your back tooth when a toothpick is not available. - by RainMaker
Also, Gary, the corner works like a charm for getting that little piece of tuna out of your back tooth when a toothpick is not available.
I didn't want to say that, but it was on my mind. Business cards are the number one toothpick substitutes in our culture.

You could look it up. - by Gary Boye
I didn't want to say that, but it was on my mind. Business cards are the number one toothpick substitutes in our culture.

You could look it up.
My wife busts my chops all of the time about this. :) - by Houston
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