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The Importance Of Simplicity In Sales

I was watching a protege of mine recently and the main thing I saw besides all the good things was the way not only him but most sales persons complicate the sale. Everyone wants to expound on there talking points until they have virtually talked themselves out of the sale. When a client says lets do it...that IS what he means! He does not mean tell him more about the product or services.

When this particular protege watched me work the other day we called on 4 people and with an average of approximately 15 minutes per client I sold 3 of them. Until today this particular salesperson thought it was just my unique ability...UNTIL TODAY, then I gave him his talking points and he closed the entire sale in less than 10 minutes.



You have to learn to keep it SIMPLE! This theory even extends into the paperwork. You have already done the heavy lifting and the paperwork must become a mere formality. The paperwork cannot be explained to the point that the client wants to pay more attention to the paperwork then he did towards the entire presentation. AGAIN, forget about yourself and keep it SIMPLE! - by The Specialist
I was watching a protege of mine recently and the main thing I saw besides all the good things was the way not only him but most sales persons complicate the sale. Everyone wants to expound on there talking points until they have virtually talked themselves out of the sale. When a client says lets do it...that IS what he means! He does not mean tell him more about the product or services.

When this particular protege watched me work the other day we called on 4 people and with an average of approximately 15 minutes per client I sold 3 of them. Until today this particular salesperson thought it was just my unique ability...UNTIL TODAY, then I gave him his talking points and he closed the entire sale in less than 10 minutes.



You have to learn to keep it SIMPLE! This theory even extends into the paperwork. You have already done the heavy lifting and the paperwork must become a mere formality. The paperwork cannot be explained to the point that the client wants to pay more attention to the paperwork then he did towards the entire presentation. AGAIN, forget about yourself and keep it SIMPLE!
I really agree on this. The world is an exceptionally complicated place. There's more and more "noise" out there. Things are moving too fast to keep up. People really appreciate clear, easily understood communication. It's a great differentiator (especially if you competitors try to dazzle with jargon and technical details).

KISS - Keep It Simple, Stupid. :-) - by Ed McLean
I know I talk too much especially with the paperwork. :( But I'm working on it. :) - by Thomas
Hi thespecialist,

I mostly agree with your point. But it seems like you're really suggesting that salespeople need to "be focused in their presentations" and "salespeople shouldn't talk more than they need to" more than the concept of "keeping it simple?" I'm just thinking that some sales are very complex and the issue isn't simplicity so much as it is focus and spewing salespeople who talk to much!

The best to you! - by Skip Anderson
The paperwork cannot be explained to the point that the client wants to pay more attention to the paperwork then he did towards the entire presentation. AGAIN, forget about yourself and keep it SIMPLE!
This is great advice. How do you personally decide what information is necessary to pass on and what isn't? - by Liberty
when you make the sale,shut up .don't talk them out of it.thankfully i learned this very early on.shds; - by easyrider1
Keeping something simple to sell simple and making something more complicated or complex to sell also simple in it's components is the goal - skip is right about focus.

MitchM - by MitchM
Nobody cares how much you know until they know how much you care.

Our sales cycle is 3-6 months, not 10-15 minutes, but I think this is a universal rule.

Few sales people understand the value of listening and the value of silence following a qualifying question - the good and great ones do. - by Eric Count5
Focused and attentive listening isn't something easy to arrive at for most people, is it. Reducing or turning off a noisy clutter of thought so that one can hear what's being said and implied OR isn't being said but needs to be addressed is one of the keys to achieving simplicity.

The virtue of silence is one of empowerment and freedom given to the prospect which in turn produces mutual trust and empowerment and freedom for the seller. Cycles have to be recognized and respected.

Good insights, Eric - causing me to embellish a little. Thanks!

MitchM - by MitchM
Simple is good but not at the expense of building rapport (with an eye towards true, long-standing relationships).

I'm sure that most companies are accosted throughout the day by myriad SRs selling everything from stationery to professional services. If we "over-stay" our usefulness, we risk taking too much of the acount's time. Sometimes, it's better to build the rel