Home > Personal Selling > Did you develop your sales skills on your own or through other means?

Did you develop your sales skills on your own or through other means?

Your comments are welcomed? - by Wonderboy
I think like most people I learned both ways. Mostly, through reading sales books and training seminars.

Also, I think you learn alot from watching other people.

Speaking of I would like to get in contact with other people who sell advertising. I feel I still have alot to learn in this area. I am somewhat new to this. I used to sell cars and I was a hotel sales manager for 4 years. This isn't coming to me as easy as other types of sales have. - by staceylee
I think I have put together little parts of all who I admired. - by Ed Callais
I read the materials that Avon provided me in the start up kit for new representatives and I also took most of the online training classes and Webinar classes available to me. They are really helpful. I need to take the rest of them! - by ozzie
If you sell complex high-ticket stuff, check out Jeff Thull.

If you want to sell to big companies check Jill Konrath

Either way, check Sharon Drew Morgen

If you plan to do phone work, check Ari Galper

What they have in common is that they look at sales from a totally new perspective. This is not the old fashioned peddler-type high-pressure selling. It's neat stuff. - by Bald Dog
What they have in common is that they look at sales from a totally new perspective. This is not the old fashioned peddler-type high-pressure selling. It's neat stuff.
Have you found any top rated or best selling books on selling authored in the last twenty years that featuring the old fashioned peddler-type high-pressure selling? I haven't but that style of selling is used in a lot of comparisons and I can't see why. - by Houston
Have you found any top rated or best selling books on selling authored in the last twenty years that featuring the old fashioned peddler-type high-pressure selling?
All the books that talk about handling objection, which is a different way of saying "Today I'll walk away with your money whatever it takes."

Handling objections is basically saying, "I don't care what you want. I'll sell you something even if it kills you!"

But I may be overly harsh... a tad. - by Bald Dog

But I may be overly harsh... a tad.
I think you're being a bit harsh in the sense that every salesperson tries to deal with and overcome objections. They may not do it in the traditional format, but rather to address anticipated objections within their presentation to prevent the objection in the first place, whether that presentation takes the format of a traditional presentation, is worked into a questioning sequence, is addressed in a solutions proposal, or whatever.

I've yet to see a selling model that doesn't address the issues the traditional model tries to address, from presentation, to overcoming objections, to closing. They may look different, they sound different, they may have a different format, and they may feel different, but they all seek to do the samething--show a prospect why they should consider a particular product or servce to address a need or want and culminate in a sale. - by pmccord
All the books that talk about handling objection, which is a different way of saying "Today I'll walk away with your money whatever it takes."

Handling objections is basically saying, "I don't care what you want. I'll sell you something even if it kills you!"
Yes, Bald, I think you might be a tad bit critical! I have three comments:

1. I don't believe overcoming objections (I prefer the term "handling objections") is no unethical or manipulative. It's really about giving prospects the information they need to make the correct buying decision.

2. Many objections prospects give are only fake objections (I call them "smokescreen objections") that merely mask the real objection. Salespeople can only deal with the issues they know about and understand, so a wise salesperson will investigate objections to determine the validity and accuracy of the objection.

3. In general, prospects love the status quo (they resist change, even if change is in their best interest). Many objections merely cover up the salesperson's resistance to buy because buying something is a form of change. A salesperson has to make it easy for the prospect to dismiss the status quo long enough to be open to change.

The best to you!

Skip - by Skip Anderson
If you sell complex high-ticket stuff, check out Jeff Thull.

If you want to sell to big companies check Jill Konrath

Either way, check Sharon Drew Morgen

If you plan to do phone work, check Ari Galper

What they have in common is that they look at sales from a totally new perspective. This is not the old fashioned peddler-type high-pressure selling. It's neat stuff.
I didn't find anything from Jeff Thull, Jill Konrath or Ari Galper that I would call a totally new perspective but I'm also not comparing their work to outdated sales training methods. Sharon Drew Morgan's work is such a totally new perspective that I don't think most people understand it. - by SpeedRacer
Handling objections is basically saying, "I don't care what you want. I'll sell you something even if it kills you!"
Helping someone resolve a question or a concern (objection) does not equate to "I don't care what you want. I'll sell you something even if it kills you!" in my opinion. - by SpeedRacer
If you sell complex high-ticket stuff, check out Jeff Thull.

I took one of his classes when I was selling jets (high ticket, not hugely complex), and I was really disappointed. It was 'sold' as something for advanced sales, but it was a lot of rehashing of stuff I already knew.

Susan - by susana
> 2. Many objections prospects give are only fake objections (I call them "smokescreen objections") that merely mask the real objection.

But an objection is an obstacle in the way of an honest dialogue.

"Mr. Seller, your price is high. Go away!" is an objection.

"Mr. Seller, could we massage your price to see how we can figure out a price we can afford?" is an honest dialogue.

But knowing that a fake prospect can become only a fake client, I wouldn't even engage in an interaction. But this approach requires that you have such a high demand for the stuff you're selling that you can easily dismiss anyone who runs even a tiny red flag.

> 3. In general, prospects love the status quo (they resist change, even if change is in their best interest). Many objections merely cover up the salesperson's resistance to buy because buying something is a form of change.

I think this is why the diagnosis is better than presentation. Presentation is about the benefits you'll enjoy some day. Hard to relate to it. Diagnosis is about a specific indicator, point of frustration the prospect is experiencing right now. This is easy to relate to because it's happening now.

To make people change to a new and better state is hard. But to make them change from an existing demonstrably painful situation is a lot easier.

Thoughts? - by Bald Dog
Yes, Bald, I think you might be a tad bit critical! I have three comments:

1. I don't believe overcoming objections (I prefer the term "handling objections") is no unethical or manipulative. It's really about giving prospects the information they need to make the correct buying decision.

2. Many objections prospects give are only fake objections (I call them "smokescreen objections") that merely mask the real objection. Salespeople can only deal with the issues they know about and understand, so a wise salesperson will investigate objections to determine the validity and accuracy of the objection.

3. In general, prospects love the status quo (they resist change, even if change is in their best interest). Many objections merely cover up the salesperson's resistance to buy because buying something is a form of change. A salesperson has to make it easy for the prospect to dismiss the status quo long enough to be open to change.

The best to you!

Skip
1. "...It's really about giving prospects the information they need to make the correct buying decision.

2. Many objections prospects give are only fake objections (I call them "smokescreen objections") that merely mask the real objection. Salespeople can only deal with the issues they know about and understand, so a wise salesperson will investigate objections to determine the validity and accuracy of the objection."

With respect to the first statement, why not give the information in your presentation before the objection is raised? Why leave yourself in the position of possibly contradicting the prospect from the prospect's perspective?

With respect to fake objections, whether or not they're fake isn't the issue. Prospects unwittingly make many mistakes in their statements so putting them on the spot often irritates them. Better to make use of your time and move on to the next to make more sales. - by Wonderboy
Some excellent comments, Wonderboy.

"why not give the information in your presentation before the objection is raised?
Wonderboy, I totally agree that it's to best to give all pertinent info in your presentation. But what do you do if you learn new information via the prospect's objection? Do you think that providing new information is a way that a salesperson can effectively handle that objection?

With respect to fake objections, whether or not they're fake isn't the issue.
I respectfully disagree! Many sales have been derailed because of the salesperson accepting the smokescreen objection and not getting to the real objection.

Prospects unwittingly make many mistakes in their statements so putting them on the spot often irritates them.
What is your feeling about overcoming objections: Is "overcoming objections" always putting prospects on the spot? Can a salesperson successfully handle objections without putting the prospect on the spot?

Better to make use of your time and move on to the next to make more sales.
Is that really how you feel? You would decide to move on to another prospect rather than spend any effort handling objections? - by Skip Anderson
Some excellent comments, Wonderboy.



Wonderboy, I totally agree that it's to best to give all pertinent info in your presentation. But what do you do if you learn new information via the prospect's objection? Do you think that providing new information is a way that a salesperson can effectively handle that objection?



I respectfully disagree! Many sales have been derailed because of the salesperson accepting the smokescreen objection and not getting to the real objection.



What is your feeling about overcoming objections: Is "overcoming objections" always putting prospects on the spot? Can a salesperson successfully handle objections without putting the prospect on the spot?



Is that really how you feel? You would decide to move on to another prospect rather than spend any effort handling objections?
As far as the first part goes, through your own experience and others, you should be able to anticipate whatever a prospect brings up. Very little that is new really arises in sales - so called new products and/or services are often just minor improvements on prior ones. A solid presentation would cover all the pertinent fine points

It would seem you'd lose sales by not pursuing some customers.
In the big picture I have found I've made more sales by making more valuable use of my time on who the true candidates are so the key is to screen out those who are wasting YOUR time.

I've been in sales, off and on, for over 15 years. What I'm relating is based on hard experience and research. If there is any controversy I don't apologize as a fact is a fact. Often the truth is hard to face (many examples from science).

A revolution is coming. - by Wonderboy
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