Home > Personal Selling > Do you believe in being a "sales superstar"?

Do you believe in being a "sales superstar"?

I'm wondering if being a "sales superstar" is something possible or just a myth created sales trainer.

I would define a sales superstar as someone who break sales record in his company and surpass all his co-workers.

Maybe have you met some hpy3; - by RyanH
Twice I had the opportunity to work with a sales superstar. Both of these salesmen performed heads above everyone else in the company. - by Liberty
My friends who have trained me and continue to coach and offer their experiences for me to examine wouldn't call themselves super stars nor would I. These are half a million and million dollar yearly income earners with our company.

They've set records and are real people, not myths. Every sales situation - every industry - has them.

The best of the best to everyone.

MitchM - by MitchM
I'm wondering if being a "sales superstar" is something possible or just a myth created sales trainer.

I would define a sales superstar as someone who break sales record in his company and surpass all his co-workers.

Maybe have you met some hpy3;
"Superstars" exist in every endeavor, and sales is no different. What is difficult for some salespeople to understand is that sales performance is a result of knowledge and skill which can be changed (and also personality and personal strengths which can't be changed). Every single salesperson can improve their sales performance if they want to. - by Skip Anderson
I'm wondering if being a "sales superstar" is something possible or just a myth created sales trainer.

I would define a sales superstar as someone who break sales record in his company and surpass all his co-workers.
Maybe have you met some hpy3;
I have met hundreds.

I have gone out on sales calls with hundreds of the top one percent of salespeople in 23 different industries. Their average sales volumes are 12 to 20 times greater than the average of the other salespeople in their industries.

As an example, the average full time Realtor earns about $80 thousand. I know four of the top 20 Realtors in North America. Their average income is well over $2 million.

It's not that they are much smarter or work harder. It's that they have intuitively and experientially learned a different way to sell. The way most of that top one percent sell is very different from the way most of the other 99 percent sell. - by JacquesWerth
Would it be correct to say, Jacques, that smarter is actually having that intuitively and learned ability to find what they want which is people wanting what they offer by weeding of those who don't?

So that would be using smarter in the sense of making better use of effort and time than the other 99% make use of it, NOT necessarily book or tactic or knowledge smarter?

MitchM - by MitchM
Mitch, if the company is worth working for, they ensure that they covet their over-acheivers! I remember interviewing for a sales management position with the CEO of a firm and, I asked him up front, "Do you have any problems with me earning more than you?" At first he was flusterred but, once he recalled the fact that the sales comp'n was a variable cost, he saw where I was going!

My daughter was on the national team and, in an effort to bring my experience to bear on her efforts, I told her to set your goals high ("aim for the stars, you'll hit the tree-tops ... aim for the tree-tops, you'll hit the roots"). You need to have something against which to set your goals AND that "something" must be meaningful.

In sales, it's quota or target income (T.I.). Or, for the REAL superstars, it's their personal income aspirations!

Good luck & good selling!
Pat - by OUTSource Sales
That's exactly how it is with the company I work for - I'm an independent agent but I'm working for the company - we're all working for the company unless we are the company.

PIA is everything!

MitchM - by MitchM
Would it be correct to say, Jacques, that smarter is actually having that intuitively and learned ability to find what they want which is people wanting what they offer by weeding of those who don't?

So that would be using smarter in the sense of making better use of effort and time than the other 99% make use of it, NOT necessarily book or tactic or knowledge smarter?
MitchM
Most of the top salespeople that I know are into sales skills and sales knowledge acquisition, and constant improvement through testing and statistical analysis.

They tend to be analytical and systematic. They keep plying the same process, while striving to improve it. They occasionally make dramatic changes to their process and test those changes.

Most of them participate in at least one sales training course every year. Some of them have taken our course as many as five to seven times.

One of the contributions we made to increasing their success is to show them how to consistently stay on process without memorization.

My study of them, and their feed-back, enabled me to develop the HPS process, to constantly improve the process, and to become one of them. - by JacquesWerth
I've read that AR before becoming the success guru he is now, embrassed a successful career in selling breaking every sales record in the companny he worked for.

He is one of the reason why I wanted to start a career in selling. Reading "How to master the art of selling" by Tom Hopkins is another one...sn; - by RyanH
I've read that AR before becoming the success guru he is now, embrassed a successful career in selling breaking every sales record in the companny he worked for.

He is one of the reason why I wanted to start a career in selling. Reading "How to master the art of selling" by Tom Hopkins is another one...sn;
I like your energy, RyanH. The best to you! - by Skip Anderson
Have you ever read the book "How to close Every Sale" by Joe Girard? He is the best. The follow-up system I use is derived from him.

I often think of my prospecting and advertising skills as my "Hare" in the race to success: it creates quick bursts of sales, and then takes a rest. That is, they get me new contacts; but it is my job to take care of them the right way to turn them into clients for life.

I think of my networking skills, and follow-up skills as my "Tortoise"... slow and steady, but ultimately the one that will win the race for me. It is my long term success.

One can look at it wondering which role they play in their career; but the way I look at it; I figured if I employed the ideals of both of them, I'd be sure to win, and sure to finish no matter how far the finish line.

When one reads Joe's book, they will realize that is wasn't what he said, it is what he did. He was the best at prospecting for clients; and he was also the best at taking care of them long term. Most salespeople are only good at one or the other:

1% are good at both (Super Stars).
Upper 24% really good at one.
50% so-so at both.
Lower 25% good at neither, nor do they try to be.

If you need help with follow up, read his book and then view my website by clicking on the gobe to the left.
In sales, I would also say these percentages also equal their standings on earnings. - by FollowUpMaster
You know, for the life of me, I can't remember the title of a single work-related book. I've had a number foisted on me by managers who couldn't put their finger on REAL skills but would quote from the 1st three chapters! And, I have a few provided as gifts or awards. There is a shelf-full right behind where I'm sitting now and I don't remember reading ANY of them!

I know of Joe Girard and believe him to be crebible.

But I get concerned when I see young SRs leaning on books to get them off-and-running. Here's the REAL wish-list for a someone new to the game:
1. Find a company that will invest in your sales skills training and,
2. Pray that their training approach includes follow-up; and,
3. Dream of having a SM who buys-into the training so that he/she can play a meaningful role as mentor/coach;

Once you've been through the clouds, then, you should start reading the books ...

Good luck & Good selling!
Pat - by OUTSource Sales
You know, for the life of me, I can't remember the title of a single work-related book. I've had a number foisted on me by managers who couldn't put their finger on REAL skills but would quote from the 1st three chapters! And, I have a few provided as gifts or awards. There is a shelf-full right behind where I'm sitting now and I don't remember reading ANY of them!

I know of Joe Girard and believe him to be crebible.

But I get concerned when I see young SRs leaning on books to get them off-and-running. Here's the REAL wish-list for a someone new to the game:
1. Find a company that will invest in your sales skills training and,
2. Pray that their training approach includes follow-up; and,
3. Dream of having a SM who buys-into the training so that he/she can play a meaningful role as mentor/coach;

Once you've been through the clouds, then, you should start reading the books ...

Good luck & Good selling!
Pat
I disagree about the book reading Pat. Since you never read the books, I guess you are lucky you had mentors and caches that did. The habit of constant improvment is one that needs to be delveloped. The information in these books is valuable, only when practiced and applied. My tip to salespeople: if you want to be the best, count on yourself. It is a good habit. You can either learn from the person who was put in a position above you (Not always usually because they would do it for the least, had good people management skills, but were failing as a salesperson). Or, you can learn from people like Joe Girard; who is in the Guiness Book of World Records as the worlds greatest salesman. You will realize it is not what he "Said" it was his attitude, actions, and applied skills that set him above the rest. It is important to have a product you believe in, but more importantly; you must believe in yourself. Information helps you develop skills, Skills help you develop Confidence, Confidence help you develop Sales. You get out what you put in, and if you want ot be in the top 1% you have to do what they did, not what the other 99% of people that you are surrounded by at work.

Best Wishes. - by FollowUpMaster
FM, I'm expressing an opinion based on a few 'grey hairs' and eons of sales. You're not required to 'agree' or 'disagree' but you might want to see the essence of what is being suggested.

It's my sense that those people (from my background) who would quote from books typically had no depth of experience. The quotes would become their basis for comparison whereas the rest of us were out there applying the lessons learned in our training.

As well, I find that people who've gone thru numerous business books tend to run into situations in the field which weren't specifically covered in the books which they've read ... then what? Since they're not being provided "skills", how do they react? As a SM, I can tell you that I've witnessed it: they "melt-down" in front of prospects.

Information provides us with the questions to ask NOT the skills. The problem for most rookies is that they "don't know what they don't know" (subconscious INcompetence). Books will not get them over this hurdle. For them to get to a level of "subconscious competence" (reflex), they need to go thru some serious training and ongoing mentoring.

In point of fact, it's well worth changing jobs (ie. if you're not getting the training and mentoring).

The challenge in forums such as this is to table our experiences in a fashion which can be utilized by the rookies. I'm not telling anyone not to read books, rather, I'm telling them to get the training under their belts. In this fashion, they can apply what they've read to the skills on which they've been trained.

Good luck & Good selling!
Pat - by OUTSource Sales
I'm not a subscriber, by the way, to "top salesperson" accolades unless I'm made aware of the dynamics.

I was a 19 y.o. ASR for Doug Hall at 3M in Ottawa and worked with him to blow away plan!

I witnessed Jack Duff blow away plan at Apple Computer and "pick-up the brass" as Apple's SR for International in Hawaii. And I watched that team's number's put Ian Stark "over-the-top" for the District Manager's global award. These OVER achievements I understand in detail.

I've seen the marginal quota assignments put small town guys into stratospheric over-performance (ie. "over-quota" versus "massive revenue generation"). So, I get suspicious whenever I hear "superstar" performance bandied about.

I was ASR (Assoc. SR) for Ross McLaughlin at Xerox. We made a gazillion 2-man calls together and we won President's Club (which he attended).

Then, I witnessed Joel Vale at Xerox take home those massive commission cheques. He used to sell grave sites and when he left for Xerox, his boss shared his secret to success. He sold to people who could not afford the services: this enabled him to re-sell the same site (after picking up some money from the previous families).

Joe Girard is impressive: I've personally seen better!

Good luck & Good selling!
Pat - by OUTSource Sales
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