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New Management

I'm not sure if it's in the right forum but mods feel free to move it


I've been in sales for a few years and have seen management come and go, they always do. Each new person comes in with fresh ideas and maybe it's just my field... but they always shake things up and rattle a few cages.

WELL

Recently we've seen a new State Manager (so he's the boss, boss, boss, boss of me) come into the ranks and after 2-3 weeks, I already loath him as does the rest of the team.

Despite being the top State for the 06/07 year, the guy is being a jerk and shaking every cage and micromanaging to the tinest detail.

So I guess what I'm getting at is what tips can you give to deal with this guy. I have my managers meeting tomorrow and I'm planned to go into their with a bam of knowledge and confidence... but otherwise yah I'm stuck (because the rest of my thoughts are killing him) - by MrCharisma
I'm not sure if it's in the right forum but mods feel free to move it


I've been in sales for a few years and have seen management come and go, they always do. Each new person comes in with fresh ideas and maybe it's just my field... but they always shake things up and rattle a few cages.

WELL

Recently we've seen a new State Manager (so he's the boss, boss, boss, boss of me) come into the ranks and after 2-3 weeks, I already loath him as does the rest of the team.

Despite being the top State for the 06/07 year, the guy is being a jerk and shaking every cage and micromanaging to the tinest detail.

So I guess what I'm getting at is what tips can you give to deal with this guy. I have my managers meeting tomorrow and I'm planned to go into their with a bam of knowledge and confidence... but otherwise yah I'm stuck (because the rest of my thoughts are killing him)
In my opinion, you have to "sell him" just as you would a customer without him knowing it. You need to engage him, you need him to trust you and not see you as a threat, you need him to like you. The better you are at doing those things, the more likely he'll back off a bit (or a lot) and cut you some slack. Asking him his opinion and letting him give a lengthy answer would be a good thing. Treat him as a difficult customer instead of a jerk boss.

Clearly, he's not managing you the way you want to be managed, and that's not good. On the other hand, though, keep yourself open to new and different information because even the worst manager has something you can use to your advantage (information, skills, point-of-view, etc.).

I hope that helps. The best to you! - by Skip Anderson
Cheers Skip

His persona is a very dominant one but what we've found is a pure lack of human relations skills. I mean he wanted to fire someone for taking a lunch break at 11:30am due to it being our "busy time".

I've been hoping what you mentioned wouldn't come up, the guy just gets under my skin and I like the idea of disliking him but in the long run, I know you're right. Swallow the pride and I guess sell myself. - by MrCharisma
I've worked under a few difficult bosses. I decided that if the people who paid the boss didn't have a problem with the boss then I better learn how to get along or move along. - by Mikey
I've worked under a few difficult bosses. I decided that if the people who paid the boss didn't have a problem with the boss then I better learn how to get along or move along.
That's the reality it, Mikey, you're right. - by Skip Anderson
I have two suggestions:

1.) Instead of thinking of him as a "whatever label you choose" try to look at him as an individual. Labels hurt both sides.

2.) Keep your eyes on the prize. Obstacles are what you see when you lose sight of your goals. - by AZBroker
I clearly think he's a jerk and am not a fan of him... but I've been thinking.

I won't invite him to my birthday or call him about last weekends footy... so he won't be my friend.

But he's my boss and he is here to fix or improve something. I've listened to what he's had to say and I see value. But attitude can change everything and funnily enough today I found out that he realised after my first encounter with him that he came out too headstrong and guns blazing... and is going to be nicer. Funny that.

I just find building rapport, especially with your new staff is the perfect way to start a relationship... not with orders.

So next time I see him, I will seek him out and offer a handshake and try to muster up a conversation.

I was just seeking advice to see if we'd had a scenario like this prior and what you found to be a working attitude or method - by MrCharisma
Sounds like you've got a plan to move forward with your boss (or inspite of your boss). The best to you. - by Skip Anderson
Well, everyday brings another challenge! Here's a thought, why not close the door and talk one-on-one?

For example, when I had a "political situation" come-up at Xerox, I asked if the time was right and, on his approval, walked-in. I positioned the big picture (ie. he makes his quota based on the cumulative efforts of the sales rep's including my sales): isn't that right? (end of analogy with Xerox)

Back to your situation (with the big picture in-place): "If we're in agreement on that critical topic, wouldn't you agree that our chances to succeed as a team improve dramatically, if we all buy-into the vision?"

Then you might try something like, "I'm having difficulty with the environment since your arrival and would deeply appreciate your insight into making it a more productive place to be ..."

With allowance for your own personal style and how you believe he will react, you need to get this stuff onto-the-table. Otherwise, the light at the end of the tunnel might well be another train!!

Good luck & good selling!
Pat - by OUTSource Sales
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