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How to talk someone into buying.

Isn't there a public perception that salespeople will try to talk people into buying? How would a salesperson do this? How can you talk someone into buying? What would it sound like? - by Bulldog
How can you talk someone into buying? What would it sound like?
It would sound something like this...

Obi Wan: "These are not the droids you're looking for."

Imperial Storm Trooper: "These are not the droids we're looking for."

Obi Wan: "You may go about your business."

Imperial Storm Trooper: "You may go about your business."

Seriously, being involved in complex, competitive, high-dollar B2B sales, I don't think any salesperson talks anybody into buying anything - unless they are blessed - like Obi Wan - with the Power of the Force.

Good professional salespeople know two things.
  1. If I talk them into buying (i.e., trick or manipulate them into buying) from me, they will most likely not be a happy and repeat customer.
  2. If I can't find real needs that are addressed by the solution I am selling, they won't buy from me.
Now, emotional needs are real needs. The CEO that wants to make a mark by deploying - rightly or wrongly - the latest technology is satisfying an emotional need. If a salesperson can find and use that need to their advantage, they are good a sales person - not a Jedi Knight.

Jim Cundiff - by jcundiff
Isn't there a public perception that salespeople will try to talk people into buying? How would a salesperson do this? How can you talk someone into buying? What would it sound like?
I love the way you phrase those questions. I, too, would like to know what it would sound like. I can't remember any salesperson talking me into buying anything.

I DO remember salespeople talking their way out of making a sale to me. - by Joe Closer
The great sales trainer and speaker from years gone by, Fred Herman, would tell the story of the guy who walked into the car dealership, and approached a salesman with:

"Are you the fellow that sold me that car last year?"

Salesman: "Why, yes, I believe I am."

Customer: "Well, would you mind giving me that sales pitch again? I get SO discouraged!" - by Joe Closer
:sec Push the hot button(s) and make it easy to say yes. People do things for their own reasons. Find out what those reasons are and fan the flame. - by Frankie
:sec Push the hot button(s) and make it easy to say yes. People do things for their own reasons. Find out what those reasons are and fan the flame.
Fan the flame AND feel the burn.

I'm not saying you can talk someone into doing something they don't want to do. That might not be possible and it definately isn't ethical. My wife talks me into doing things all the time. - by Marcus
Isn't there a public perception that salespeople will try to talk people into buying? How would a salesperson do this? How can you talk someone into buying? What would it sound like?
I would take out my pocket watch and swing it back and forth in front of the prospect to hypnotize him. Then I would use mind-altering drugs to really get his attention.

If you believe the above, I have a bridge to sell you (the reality is you can't talk someone into buying - consumer choice lives on). - by Wonderboy
I'm only a newbie to your forum without experience in successfully making consistent sales, so take my answer with a grain of salt.

I do think that public perception exists that sales people can sell you something you don't want.

Does it happen? Well, yes and no. Friends and family frequently report to me that (pushy) sales people in stores - places where we are already going to buy something we need - can be very successful in making us buy UP from what we really want. So does that count toward your questions? I don't believe they can make us buy if we don't already want something similar to the product - but they can be very effective at selling up. However, it has a boomerang effect that makes the buyer wary of all pitches in the future. So the success is short lived and creates a bad taste in the collective mouth of the public, in my humble opinion.

Just my opinion. - by LM-2008
Salesmen and sales women who profess to not believe it possible to talk people into buying often use that as a shield to cover themselves calling whatever people do: free will, their choice, and not of my doing!

Talking people into a sale can look and sound and feel like many things so I'm not going to give an example. While I can't imagine any adult with average intelligence not recognizing human aptitude and capacity, human limitation and choice as being a mix of qualities and degrees which allow many people to make very poor choices guided by the skilled hands of someone wishing to guide them into a decision, I suppose there are people who don't recognize that.

The fact is there are many people who can be pushed, convinced, persuaded, talked into, and manipulated into a purchase which they later regret notwithstanding the use of their own free will to some extent.

Of course I would expect sales professionals to understand these things and many to have been explicitedly trained in these areas - I don't know having not been in sales all my life and never having gone through any sales training outside the business I'm in - which does have a training program.

BUT I may be wrong about all this. That public perception may either just be a myth or mass hysteria based on nothing substantial and/or delusional thinking based on primitive fear with no reality grounding other than possibly one or two issolated cases greatly magnified in the media and minds of the public! You know how people are!

Servizebiz makes some good points, though!

MitchM - by MitchM
How would a salesperson do this? How can you talk someone into buying? What would it sound like?
Trigger Events! Read post #12 by Liberty in the http://www.salespractice.com/forums/t-552.html thread. That's an example of what it would sound like. - by Houston
I don't think you can talk someone into buying. A buying client will always have some interest in the product prior to purchasing.

If someone knocked on my door offering window tinting, I'd tell them to f**k off because I don't need it and there is no way someone could talk me into it. That example goes with a lot of products.

However if I felt I might have needed a window tinting, I may be informed well enough by a sales consultant to eventually purchase. - by MrCharisma
Trigger Events! Read post #12 by Liberty in the http://www.salespractice.com/forums/t-552.html thread. That's an example of what it would sound like.
After reading through this thread, and most of the 14 pages of the other one cited, let me give you this expamle of a hurdle I constantly face in the sales cycle.

I sell industrial air cleaning equipment, and my market is machine and welding shops. In May of 2006, OSHA passes and puts into effect a new standard on Hexavalent Chromium ( a known carcenogen) related to people who are exposed through several different manufacturing processes to include chrome plating shops, welding, and machine shops that weld or machine stainless steel. Hexavalent Chromium is found to cause cancer in 8 out of 100 people exposed to it for extended periods of time over an 8 hour work shift. The current OSHA action level for corrective action to be taken to prevent exposure is .5 micrograms per cubic meter.

If a shop is tested, and found to have .5 micrograms per cubic meter or more, they are required to implement corrective action. Now, .5 micrograms per cubic meter is a miniscule amount. There are three different forms of corrective action that OSHA says will reduce the amount of Cr(VI) in the workplace.

1. Change the process to lower exposure.

2. Implement engineering practices to capture the contaminent from the workers breathing zone, and the air in the general area around the process. This is where the air cleaners come into play.

3. Create a "regulated area" around the process that must be paid for by the employer to include respirators, work clothing, laundering facilities for the clothing, specialized shower,changing, and break areas, and they must constantly monitor any employee who works in or even passes through a regulated area to make sure they don't smoke, eat, rub their eyes, pick their nose... whatever may cause an exposure incident.

Out of the three, guess which one is the easiest and most cost effective to implement. Getting shop owners and management to recognize it, is where I get stumped. I've tried the truth, I've tried to get them to be concerned for workers health, scare tactics... nothing seems to get through other than their bottom line, which, if the get caught not being compliant with the standard, can be greatly effected. But hey, if they don't get caught, who's the wiser, right?:dun - by DaveAtICA
In B2B sales the only concern usually is going to be how your product or service benefits the company in a monetary manner. If just one of their workers gets exposed and sues the company. Can that company afford the loss of legal expenses and possible damages? And God forbid how large the settlement would be if the employee found out that the company knew about the hazards and had the opportunity to fix it and did'nt. Sir I've been here, I've shown you the hazards, You can't plead ignorance. Let's get this problem resolved. - by klozerking
Selling something which somebody "doesn't want" is one perspective. What about: selling something which "someone doesn't know they need"? In other words, for the astute SR, bringing a level of awareness to your prospects.

For example, appealing to a 'C' level, the tax implications of a proposal which has languished elsewhere in the company. Or, pitching the benefits of technology which impact the company's business versus selling the features to the user group.

EXAMPLE: In the rail industry, the user group found our rail profiling technology appealing for projecting maintenance requirements. Senior Counsel, though, got seriously interested in our technology (which captured 7.5 profile sets/second) because they could wheel hand-carts full of print-outs which proved the rail condition immediately before a de-railment. The CFO got intimate with us because the technology implied multi-millions in first year savings because it drastically cut the amount of unnecessary rail replacement.

I hope the preceding made sense!

Good luck & Good selling!
Pat - by OUTSource Sales
The only tool a person needs sell something to another is his or her choice of WORDS. So based on that, YES you can talk someone into buying something. I do that everyday.

A 19 cent Bic pen and words are all you need. Words are very powerful. Use them well.

Peace,

salespro - by salespro
How other than words, either spoken or written, is ANYBODY sold ANYTHING?

Think about it. Words dictate how or if someone buys something.
Whether a Frosted Flakes commercial which is pure marketing or a salesperson directly selling something, words and communication are ALL that is necessary.

All the best,

salespro - by salespro
Well, I've always done the opposite. If you ask the right questions and let people talk, you'll find they talk themselves into buying. You certainly need to provide proof, due diligence materials, testimonials, etc, but that's my 'system' in a nutshell.

Susan - by susana
I would only add to Susana's post, when people know what they want and are ready to buy they'll ask the questions they need answers to proving to themselves we have what they want.

The reverse of that i.e. the sales person asking the questions and providing the proof the prospects needs completes the sales transaction which is mutual and relational - it ends with everyone happy, respectful, and getting what they wanted.

Susana - do you have a formula for asking the "right questions" or do the depend on the market you approach or do they arise "organically" through a conversation?

MitchM - by MitchM
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