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Customer Satisfaction: How far is too far?

When it comes to customer satisfaction how far are you willing to go to make/keep the customer happy? - by AZBroker
I'm willing to perform as agreed. Nothing more. ;) - by Jackie
As far as I can without compromising my dignity, ethics, or pocketbook! - by Irene Morales Ward
As far as I can without compromising my dignity, ethics, or pocketbook!
Good answer. I agree. - by RainMaker
As far as I can without compromising my dignity, ethics, or pocketbook!
I agree with Irene, and I'd add that I will do as much for a customer as is within my definition of my services. For example, if I was a web designer and my client wanted me to actually write her copy, but I had decided to focus just on design, I wouldn't go outside my strategy just to please that customer. I might, however, hire or refer her to a writer.

Make sense?

We need to learn to set our course by the stars, not by the lights of every passing ship -- Omar Nelson Bradley

Terri Z - by Terri Zwierzynski
If you're referring to problem resolution, I'd do whatever is necessary, assuming that the customer believes they have a legitimate problem, even if it affects my pocketbook.

If it seems like the customer is just out to get something for nothing, I'll draw the line, of course, because I know they'll never be able to make a case with other people if they're asking for something unreasonable.

There are statistics that go something like: a satisfied customer will tell 2 other people, but a dissatisfied customer will tell 10. It's very difficult to regain a reputation.

So, if I give them a discount on their next purchase, and they're happy, so be it. I want happy customers. And, of course, the best way to avoid problems in the first place is to make very sure you and your customer are communicating about expectations and results! - by KSA-Mktg
If you're referring to problem resolution, I'd do whatever is necessary, assuming that the customer believes they have a legitimate problem, even if it affects my pocketbook.
That would go too far for me.

If there "is" a legitimate issue then I'll make it right but for me the client's beliefs or perception have no impact on what "is" legitimate. - by AZBroker
That would go too far for me.
AZ - I didn't say I'd let someone walk over me. Guess I was thinking about a time when I sold signs. And, maybe a customer got upset about the color of the lettering. They wanted red, and they got red, but to them, it looked more like orange. Neither of us did anything wrong, and a reasonable person wouldn't make a big issue of it.

But, if someone was really upset, guess I could have told them that it was just too bad. What I would most likely do is to say that I was sorry that what the manufacturer called red wasn't their idea of red, suggest that for their next sign, we should look at the colors so they could pick the one they liked, regardless of what the color was called.

Most people would accept that, but if someone was going to walk out mad, I'd offer a 10% discount on their next order. Problems like that didn't come up very often. And, if the small discount on their next order kept them coming back and referring others, I considered it a marketing expense!

You may still disagree, but just thought I'd clarify. :)

Kathleen - by KSA-Mktg
You may still disagree, but just thought I'd clarify. :)
Your example sounds legitimate to me. :) - by AZBroker
As I see it, "Customer Satisfaction" is subjective by nature. To remedy this, "objective" metrics could and probably should be adopted. - by Gilbert
As I see it, "Customer Satisfaction" is subjective by nature. To remedy this, "objective" metrics could and probably should be adopted.
I agree. This "metric" or measurement of satisfaction could be tied to specific objectives or outcomes. This will keep the surprises down to a minimum at the end of the project. - by SalesGuy
When it comes to customer satisfaction how far are you willing to go to make/keep the customer happy?
If you're in sales, how far can you go? It's important that you create and manage good experiences for your customer. It's equally important to keep all of your promises. Lastly, I think it's expected that you would act on behalf of your customer to resolve problems with the company you represent or their service.

Regarding "how far", those are finite responsibilities for salespeople. It seems that the question and most of the previous replies involve owners or managers of a company