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Validation NOT Objection

Our sales approach is to get a buying commitment upfront - obviously that can change as things move ahead - and from the "I want to" to the customer buying, everything in between is about validation, not objection.

What that means is that what we address with the buyer validates his/her buying decision, conditions of satisfaction, and our ability to deliver mutually understood between us. In that context there are never objections - questions are about fulfillments of commitment, details, etc.

At anytime in the closing process either side can quit if mutually agreeable commitments can't be made - that's a given. But stopping the process isn't about being able to not over come objections - it's about not being able to either do business with a prospect who becomes untrustworthy or the two[or more] of you discovering it impossible to fulfill mutual expectations.

Along with that the skilled seller facilitates the buyer by helping the buyer understand his/her internal dynamics which could keep the decision from being made. This isn't a manipulation to get the buyer to buy - it's a manipulation through discourse and questions of helping the buyer work through his/her own road blocks and filters or considerations which keep a decision from being made.

All of that is the ideal for a healthy relationship honoring validation and free of resistance, objection, and a struggle to make a sale.

MitchM - by MitchM
Our sales approach is to get a buying commitment upfront - obviously that can change as things move ahead - and from the "I want to" to the customer buying, everything in between is about validation, not objection.

What that means is that what we address with the buyer validates his/her buying decision, conditions of satisfaction, and our ability to deliver mutually understood between us. In that context there are never objections - questions are about fulfillments of commitment, details, etc.

At anytime in the closing process either side can quit if mutually agreeable commitments can't be made - that's a given. But stopping the process isn't about being able to not over come objections - it's about not being able to either do business with a prospect who becomes untrustworthy or the two[or more] of you discovering it impossible to fulfill mutual expectations.

Along with that the skilled seller facilitates the buyer by helping the buyer understand his/her internal dynamics which could keep the decision from being made. This isn't a manipulation to get the buyer to buy - it's a manipulation through discourse and questions of helping the buyer work through his/her own road blocks and filters or considerations which keep a decision from being made.

All of that is the ideal for a healthy relationship honoring validation and free of resistance, objection, and a struggle to make a sale.

MitchM
MitchM, has anybody ever told you that what you are selling is too expensive?

If so, that's an objection (and therefore, it's inaccurate for you to say "there are never objections). You may choose to call it something other than an objection, or you may choose to stop your selling efforts at the time someone tells you your price is too high, but it's still an objection.

When I hear an objection from a prospect, I want to deal with the objection, not run away. From your previous posts, it sounds like you prefer to run away. That's a pity, because an objection is nothing to be afraid of. And salespeople who choose to deal with prospect objections instead of running away are nothing to be afraid of either.

I might say to the prospect, "When you say my price is too expensive, to what are you comparing my price?" or any of a hundred other responses. Some of the time these responses will lead to no sale. Other times, it will lead to continued dialogue, and that valuable dialogue will lead to a purchase (because the prospect chose to purchase not because I forced the money out of their hands).

Handling an objection is choosing to do SOMETHING rather than choosing to do NOTHING, and those who do something will sell more than those who do nothing.

I agree with your statement that "not being able to either do business with a prospect who becomes untrustworthy or the two of you discovering it impossible to fulfill mutual expectations" is part of selling. But it is hardly a revolutionary selling theory (even though some might position it that way to sell more books), and it certainly doesn't have anything at all to do with handling objections. An objection isn't about either party (the salesperson or the prospect) being untrustworthy, and it isn't about being "impossible to fulfill mutual expectations."

Skip Anderson - by Skip Anderson
Yes I've been told that after someone said: I want it and the details of the conversation were leading to a purchase. It happens rarely but happens because I get a commitment up front.

When it does happen I address that objection to cost: "At anytime in the closing process either side can quit if mutually agreeable commitments can't be made - that's a given. But stopping the process isn't about being able to not over come objections - it's about not being able to either do business with a prospect who becomes untrustworthy or the two[or more] of you discovering it impossible to fulfill mutual expectations." -- MitchM

At that point I will, ther than resist their objection by debating it or trying to over come it by helping them see the value of what we offer, ask if they would like to look at purchase options or not. That offer when taken could turn it around BUT these are viable options - so in that sense I've over come their objection to cost with options.

BUT usually they reject the options so I say OKAY and it's done.

Skip, I've never said how I work is 100% water tight. Questions come up that could be called options but I see them typically as part of the coming-in-agreement with the details - I do it by asking questions back concerning their concern rather than pulling out an OvercomingTheObjection Script - if they don't meet my question with a positive: I'll still want it -- I end it.

Once upon a time I had many things to say to over come the objection of cost and: 1. I wasted too much time with two sales and 2. those whose objections I over powered bought but eventually quit buying.

Since my business is dependent on monthly orders it's absolutely necessary they buy into our products with no salesmanship on my part that gets them to buy because they'll more than likely quit. I watched it happen over and over. Over coming objections cost me time, profits, and repeat sales.

Still, people today will buy and not reorder when I've done everything to my satisfaction - no system is 100% perfect as you know and I've never said mine is 100% perfect. BUT it's very accurate!

Good morning and Happy Thanksgiving - I better go wash the dishes my wife and grand daughter are leaving for me as they make apple pies!

MitchM - by MitchM
Our sales approach is to get a buying commitment upfront - obviously that can change as things move ahead - and from the "I want to" to the customer buying, everything in between is about validation, not objection.

What that means is that what we address with the buyer validates his/her buying decision, conditions of satisfaction, and our ability to deliver mutually understood between us. In that context there are never objections - questions are about fulfillments of commitment, details, etc.

At anytime in the closing process either side can quit if mutually agreeable commitments can't be made - that's a given. But stopping the process isn't about being able to not over come objections - it's about not being able to either do business with a prospect who becomes untrustworthy or the two[or more] of you discovering it impossible to fulfill mutual expectations.

Along with that the skilled seller facilitates the buyer by helping the buyer understand his/her internal dynamics which could keep the decision from being made. This isn't a manipulation to get the buyer to buy - it's a manipulation through discourse and questions of helping the buyer work through his/her own road blocks and filters or considerations which keep a decision from being made.

All of that is the ideal for a healthy relationship honoring validation and free of resistance, objection, and a struggle to make a sale.

MitchM
MitchM, I work in a highly competitive arena against DIRECT competition. The WANT that you refer to often is about a prospect WANTING to do business with me. Or NOT.

Often what takes place after that "want" is identified, IS validation. - by Joe Closer
I understand. My esperience is limited to one thing I've done - direct sales/network marketing with a nutritional product line for eleven years - that's one reason I call myself amateur.

I've heard of situations - cultural in context - when there's lots of socializing and dining time then business but even then I'm told the decision to do business has already been made. Maybe new players come into the situation who are looking for this or that - product or person - before joining in on the business decisions.

Joe, why would the person want to or not do business with you in this highly direct competition? What's the rub? I just don't understand.

Also, after the want - the validation - what you said is what I'm saying - whatever produces the want is lots of things then comes the validation like you say.

I just got kicked out of the kitchen for splashing soap on food -- better sneak back up.

MitchM - by MitchM
Joe, why would the person want to or not do business with you in this highly direct competition? What's the rub? I just don't understand.

MitchM
Reputation, MitchM. I'm known. I'm viewed as a source. I'm established. I'm reputable. To a relative degree, I'm positioned.

Also, as the owner of my business, I probably enjoy some sort of symbolic status in the minds of some potential clients. I'm relatively successful, and some people prefer to do business with successful people.

If that sounds easy, so be it. Laying that groundwork was sweat and blood. That is not achieved overnight. However, that describes the business I've created. - by Joe Closer
The apple pie is done baking, from scratch cranberry sauce and rolls done - all that's left is watching the rest of Macey's Parade with eldest grand daughter who just turned nine then heading out to Thanksgiving Day family fun and food! I'm escaping the parade and giving everyone else some space - my office is in the basement and I'm sent here a lot - literally sent here. That's a good thing.

I understand, Joe. YOU can deliver whatever people want so YOU and the delivery and the product delivered are ONE now in clients and potential client's eyes - right?

People want to known if my product will help them - one is, for example, a product for healthy joints which can impact many things. They want to know if it will help them and I need to know if they want help with their issue. They either may not want help meaning they are right now satisfied with what they are doing or they may not believe what I offer can help.

If they say they want what I'm offering but have questions I want to know what they'll do if I spend time answering questions to their satisfaction. Right there many say they're just looking but not ready to make a change or do something. At that point rather than try to over come any objection I end it - they can get back with me unless I get back with them later. I do that a lot.

If they say they'll start if I can give them answers they need a conversation begins - validation of details and validation of results begins. It's also a time for me to evaluate their sincerity - can I trust them or should I walk away - and for them to look into their decision making dynamics - I maybe can help that with good questions.

The other part is my necessity to build on repeat monthly orders so product results are essential - product loyalty is essential - AND you can't build any kind of a six figure income in network marketing without developing a network of people selling and recruiting. THAT is the big challenge.

When people will look at our business they have many questions but so do I about them and their ability to execute their business. Sometimes it looks good but falls apart - like hiring a sales person who looks good then flops. Nothing is for sure you know.

I've become very selective as much as I can in recruiting - many distributors come from product use first. Even being selective isn't a water tight guarantee. BUT I look for a want-to up front then quality discussion, investigation both ways, doing what I can to facilitate the right decisions to happen.

Like this post is called, all of that is done through validation, NOT over coming objections. Initially there is a YES I WANT TO then questions about how to and what to and what if come about. Many of these appear to be objections but are not - they are questions concerning belief in self - confidence - understanding the system we have, fears, etc.

I'm very much an amateur in using the high probability selling model and I've only read the book BUT what I do do has improved my business and confidence and has eliminated much wasted time from my life I can use for the other fun things I do.

Also, when I tried other selling models I could sell - I mean I sold a lot and won awards and that had some short term gain for us BUT most of the business fell away probably for a couple of reasons. One was that my follow-up was poor. BUT mostly repeat monthly orders fell away and so did distributors quit - I was really begging for sales, using the power of my communication skills to make sales happen and recruiting happen, etc. and when the smoke cleared and empty fire works containers littered the ground the crowd disappeared and I had to sweep up the mess.

NOW I know when people fully buy into what I offer because they want it and I trust them by allowing it to happen, attrition is much lower and repeat sales more inclined to happen - whether I'm talking about selling a product or recruiting a distributor it works the same.

Okay, that's it for now - enjoy your day!

Thanksgiving blessings.

MitchM - by MitchM
Along with that the skilled seller facilitates the buyer by helping the buyer understand his/her internal dynamics which could keep the decision from being made. This isn't a manipulation to get the buyer to buy - it's a manipulation through discourse and questions of helping the buyer work through his/her own road blocks and filters or considerations which keep a decision from being made.
Would you give an example of this and is there specific training for this that you recommend? - by Marcus
I've lived in Michigan all my life but am not partial to any teams - I just watch and enjoy the games. Dinnerr is done, kids are playing, clean-up is underway. son-in-law is napping - I'm escaping into this world with a glass of port.

Here's a business recruit situation. Jim says he wants to become a distributor with our company but he has problems keeping him from starting. We talk about them so I know what they are all about and he knows I'm helping him understand the best we can - so there's a genuine commitment in our relationship.

I ask him to consider what he's done in the past to overcome impasses and get moving. I ask him to consider what he and his wife would have to decide to be on the same page in this - what has to happen for that to happen. I ask him to consider what he did and how he did it in the past when situations demanded change. I ask him to consider why he may not really want to move forward and what that means. Questions like that, Marcus.

I've worked with a couple of distributors like that and they've made progress. They've made a commitment to their business decisions but things come up. Sometimes people get started then stall. Alll kinds of real people situations happen. Their motivation to change is the most important thing - I can only facilitate their decisions and personal dynamics best I can.

Everything I've ever read and looked into comes to play - same for everyone here. I'fve mostly dabbled in lots of things - Jacques Werth's high probability selling model has helped me; what Sharon Drew Morgan has to say has helped; reading scattered NLP theory and practice has helped; getting into a study of how to listen better and ask questions has helped; some of the internal martial arts I study as an amateur helps, Marcus.

What about you, how have you addressed your own mental filters and road blocks to progress, to clarity and fluidity of thought and action and how have you applied it to others?

The Thanksgiving party beckens.

MitchM - by MitchM
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