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LITTLE Things = BIG Impact?

Are there "little" things you do when working with a prospect that have made a difference in your sales performance? Perhaps there are several or many little things that you do that cumulatively have made a significant impact on your selling abilities.

I'm interested in hearing about those little things you do that maybe some or most other salespeople don't do, but that you feel have helped you become successful.

So this thread isn't about selling theory, or what selling "system" you follow or believe in, it's about things you do (behaviors, not beliefs) that might at first seem to be insignificant, but that you think have helped you in your quest for selling success.

I'd think it would be great if dozens of you would reply to this thread so we end up with a nice, long list. (Haven't posted at Sales Practice yet? Here's your chance to dip your toe in the water! Consider submitting your first post!).

Thanks!

Skip Anderson - by Skip Anderson
Are there "little" things you do when working with a prospect that have made a difference in your sales performance? Perhaps there are several or many little things that you do that cumulatively have made a significant impact on your selling abilities.

I'm interested in hearing about those little things you do that maybe some or most other salespeople don't do, but that you feel have helped you become successful.

So this thread isn't about selling theory, or what selling "system" you follow or believe in, it's about things you do (behaviors, not beliefs) that might at first seem to be insignificant, but that you think have helped you in your quest for selling success.

I'd think it would be great if dozens of you would reply to this thread so we end up with a nice, long list. (Haven't posted at Sales Practice yet? Here's your chance to dip your toe in the water! Consider submitting your first post!).

Thanks!

Skip Anderson
i try not to stand too close to my customers because they get freaky. i know a guy who gets in their face and it freaks out his customers. it sounds stupid but when i stand back i seem to get a better response from my customers. - by BobSales
No. I agree. Personal space is very important to some people. If you get too close, I would think the person would put up their 'shields' and be more resistant. - by Boxurian
when i got into sales 25yrs. ago(phone directory advertising)one on the guys on the crew that helped train me was a fairly large imposing guy that ejected spittle when he talked,and he always got close to hie prospects.he was often the top sales person out of 280 in the company.he also got the most cancellations.i imagine many bought just to get rid of him. with no prior sales experience and short on education but lots of enthusiasm to cover my fear,i started out in the top 5% in sales in the company with unheard of low number cancellations.i try to be friendly without being fake,people can spot a fake fast.i look them in the eyes,but i don't stare.i try to get comfortably close to prospect but not too close(they'll let you know if you're getting to close).but the 3 best tips i was given. 1 .close early,close often. 2.don't shoot all your bullets at one time. 3.when they say yes,quit trying to close them. - by easyrider1
The little things add up, either for or against you.

I have been told that a sale is just a bunch of yesses leading up to the close. And from my experience as a consumer buying everything from cars to tv's to mattresses, I am influenced by more than just the sales techniques being used on me.

Simple things like a salesman's clothes or mood or unconscious mannerisms, the smell of a store, the grammar used in signs or notices, lighting, and so on, make a big difference to me in whether or not I feel comfortable buying at that moment. I imagine most consumers are the same way. Whenever I am selling I try to make sure that I appear more or less 'normal' stcktng; Nothing wierd or distracting with what I'm wearing, well groomed, neat office, proper grammar and tact, even if I have a really good relationship with my customer. The slightest comment or social misstep can really turn a customer off. But, compiling a bunch of little yesses through being polite, dressing appropriately, showing your customer attention when it's due, keeping your environment inviting, etc. can really lead up to a very impressed customer and an easier sale. - by jamesrobertstclair
Thanks for sharing your thoughts, James. Anybody else wish to weigh in? - by Skip Anderson
Thanks for sharing your thoughts, James. Anybody else wish to weigh in?
Sure, why not?

That moment when you get to smile and actually touch the prospect's soul; the moment of thoughtfulness with the receptionist or personal assistant; a recommendation to the owner on where they might get new business from your network (think about what they do to sell too - even though you are not there to sell sales training!); how they might get more value from a trade in rather than taking a discount (like getting a tax receipt from a church as a give away) ...

Little things build relationships and prospects buy from people they like. - by Gold Calling
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