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Resistance to Change

Anytime something new is introduced to a system that represents a change to the status quo there is the potential for resistance. What do you do to eliminate or navigate this resistance? - by Houston
Staying mentally limber and reflective and paying attention to internal responses to changes in status quo is a learned behavior.

MitchM - by MitchM
Staying mentally limber and reflective and paying attention to internal responses to changes in status quo is a learned behavior.

MitchM
With future clients facing a change to their status quo what do you do to help the person navigate their resistance to change? - by Houston
Our support includes personal contact - telephone calls of encouragement, information, adjustments.

MitchM - by MitchM
Anytime something new is introduced to a system that represents a change to the status quo there is the potential for resistance. What do you do to eliminate or navigate this resistance?
I agree that "status quo thinking" is a powerful force within the prospect mindset. In fact, one of my "Ten Truths about Selling" is:

One effective way to deal prevent status quo paralysis is to ask a prospect, "Why would you want to buy [insert product/service here]?" This encourages the prospect to think of reasons why he/she might consider your product/service.

Back when I was selling furniture, I had a prospect looking at some upholstered furniture, but as the sales interaction progressed, he became very adamant that he didn't need new furniture. I asked him why he would even consider buying new furniture if he didn't need it. He told me that he was ready to start dating again after a messy divorce a few years earlier, and his adult daughter had told him that he needed to buy some new furniture if he was ever going to make a positive impression on future love interests.

I asked him if making a positive impression on future love interests was important to him.

He said "yes."

Then I said, "So even you don't need new furniture, would you consider buying this sofa and two chairs that you said you like?"

He said "yes." And, after further discussion, he bought. He talked himself out of status quo paralysis.

Skip Anderson - by Skip Anderson
Thank for the input MitchM.

That's a very good story Skip. Thank you for the input. - by Houston
In the UK during the industrial revolution, the term "luddites" was coined to identify resistance to change (then it was technology, mechanization). At times, resistance to change for a business can be almost cult-like (similar to the luddites).

Other times, an account can be resistant to changing suppliers. As soon as you feel your sale stalling, there are a number of topics which need to be addressed:
1. if the resistance relates to changing suppliers, you need to ask, "... when you made the change to the current supplier, what were the dynamics which appealed to you to change suppliers back then ..." (this line of thinking should uncover a way to niggle your way in on the same principals but ... beware. he might be buying from his brother-in-law);
2. if the resistance to change relates to technology, you need to work with the account to accurately identify a meaningful ROI;
3. resistance to technology can be weakened by tabling their competition ("... how have your competitors reacted to the advent of this innovation...");
4. at times, this resistance can be localized to a single individual within the firm (hopefully not the stakeholder);

You really need to get ALL of the dynamics onto the table. For example, leaps in technology can imply an ROI predicated on job loss in a union environment ... beware!!!

Once again, this is another objection to be handled.

Good luck & Good selling!
Pat - by OUTSource Sales
Sharon Drew Morgan and Jacques Werth are two individuals I take seriously for their understanding of what makes people tick and decide to do something or not. Their approachs may seem in contradiction but one commonality I understand has to do with trust in an inquiry of mutual honesty.

While one would ask "How to recognize . . ." questions in an attempt to help the prosopect answer his or her own questions unique and perhaps mysterious to the decision making process, the other would look for an immediate "want to" followed with estabilishing a relationship with a discovery/dis-qualification process that moves into conditions